Jeff Bezos is trusting Blue Origin’s new rocket with his life. It’s flown 15 times, but he’ll have no pilot and possibly no spacesuit.

Jeff Bezos is seen speaking beside a photo of Blue Origin's New Shepard rocket lifting off.
Jeff Bezos (left) is set to launch aboard the New Shepard rocket (right) on July 20.

Jeff Bezos, his brother Mark, and two unnamed people – at least one of whom is a multimillionaire – are about to place their lives in the hands of Blue Origin’s rocket engineers.

Bezos, who founded the company in 2000, announced on Monday that he and his brother would be the first passengers on its New Shepherd rocket, along with the highest bidder for the third seat. The as yet unnamed winner of that auction bid $28 million on Saturday to go on the trip. (The money will go to Blue Origin’s foundation, Club for the Future.) A fourth person will join them as well.

The group will strap into a capsule on the top of the five-story rocket as early as July 20.

“Bezos is a risk-taker,” John Logsdon, the founder of George Washington University’s Space Policy Institute and a former member of the NASA Advisory Council, told Insider. “He certainly understands that there are risks involved, and probably has a good handle on how risky it is.”

For the rest of us – who don’t have access to Blue Origin’s rocket design or risk calculations – it’s difficult to say just how much risk Bezos is taking. The company did not respond to multiple requests for comment for this story. But a few key factors offer clues.

New Shepard has flown successfully before – 15 times – but never with humans onboard. The rocket has a good test-flight record, and it features an emergency system that can jettison the passenger capsule away from a failing rocket. Plus, the whole trip is only 11 minutes long.

At the same time, however, Bezos will fly with no pilot, and probably no spacesuit. And no matter how safe New Shepard is, spaceflight is always risky. About 1% of US human spaceflights have resulted in a fatal accident, according to an analysis published earlier this year.

“That’s pretty high. It’s about 10,000 times more dangerous than flying on a commercial airliner,” George Nield, a co-author of that report, told Insider. Nield formerly served as the Federal Aviation Administration’s associate administrator and led its Office of Commercial Space Transportation.

“In order to learn how to do this safer, more reliably, and more cost effectively, many people believe we need to keep gaining experience by having more and more of these flights,” he added. “[Bezos] obviously has made the decision that having millions of people living and working in space is something that he strongly believes in, and he wants to do his part to help make that happen in some small way.”

Skimming the very edge of space lowers the risk

jeff bezos inside new shepard crew capsule
Jeff Bezos inside a New Shepard Crew Capsule mockup at the 33rd Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado, April 5, 2017.

If all goes according to plan on the day of Bezos’ flight, here’s what it’ll look like: The New Shepard rocket will fire its engines, spewing flame and smoke across the plains of West Texas. As it screams through the atmosphere, the force of the climb and the pull of Earth’s gravity – which will feel three times stronger than normal – will pin the Bezos brothers and their guests into their seats.

After three minutes, the rocket should separate from the capsule and fall back to Earth. The passengers will feel weightless as they clear the boundary of space.

The view from space on New Shepard's 15th flight, April 14, 2021.
The view from space on New Shepard’s 15th flight, April 14, 2021.

Bezos and his companions will have just three minutes in space. During that time, they can unbuckle and float around the cabin, drifting from one window to another to savor the views of Earth on one side of the spaceship and the blackness of space on the other.

As gravity takes hold again and the spaceship begins to fall back to Earth, Bezos and his co-passengers will strap in for a high-speed plunge. They will likely feel a significant jerk as three parachutes balloon into the air to brake the spaceship’s fall.

The New Shepard crew capsule parachutes to a landing at Blue Origin's Launch Site One in Texas on January 14.
The New Shepard crew capsule parachutes to a landing at Blue Origin’s Launch Site One in Texas, January 14, 2021.

The parachutes should carry the capsule to a gentle landing in the Texas desert, where a recovery crew will be waiting.

This type of flight is referred to as suborbital, since the capsule won’t enter orbit around Earth. Blue Origin designed and built New Shepard specifically to carry high-paying customers to the edge of space. The rocket is too small, and its engines don’t have enough thrust, to push itself into orbit.

But keeping the flight short and suborbital comes with pluses: There’s less chance that something will go wrong, and the vehicle is easier to control because its engines are smaller and the rocket is traveling slower than would be needed to reach orbit.

If Bezos’ flight goes well, the new launch system could look more attractive to future space tourists.

New Shepard is thoroughly tested and has an emergency-escape system

Blue Origin's reusable New Shepard suborbital rocket launches toward space in 2016.
Blue Origin’s reusable New Shepard suborbital rocket launches toward space in 2016.

The most nail-biting parts of this spaceflight will probably be when the engines burn for liftoff, when the rocket separates from the capsule, and when the parachutes deploy.

“You have a high-performance piece of machinery in the rocket engine that could break, come apart, do bad things,” Logsdon said.

New Shepard has executed all these maneuvers many times before – just not with people on board. It’s flown 15 times since 2015, with three successful tests of its emergency-escape system, which would jettison the capsule away from a failing rocket.

If a parachute fails to deploy, the capsule is designed to give more thrust to its downward-facing engines to help it land safely. If two chutes fail, a crushable “bumper” section on the bottom of the capsule should absorb the impact of landing.

“The capsule is the most highly redundant and safe spaceflight system, we think, that has ever been designed or flown,” Gary Lai, senior director of New Shepard’s design, said in a Blue Origin video about safety, posted online in April. “In most cases, you have a backup to the backup system.”

Logsdon described the New Shepard testing process as “very thorough” and “slow-paced.” He pointed out that the Space Shuttle’s very first flight had humans on board.

“Compared to the Space Shuttle Program, this is a far less risky undertaking,” Logsdon said.

Flying without spacesuits could add risk, but it may be safer if someone vomits

Ever since the Challenger disaster in 1986 – when the Space Shuttle broke apart during launch, killing all seven crew members – all NASA astronauts have worn pressurized spacesuits for launch and landing.

new shepard space capsule interior blue origin 03
A sneak peek at the final design of Blue Origin’s New Shepard capsule for suborbital space tourists.

Spacesuits would not have saved those aboard Challenger, but they could save lives if a space capsule experiences a cabin leak yet remains intact.

Blue Origin’s website, however, indicates that New Shepard passengers will wear only a jumpsuit – not a pressurized spacesuit and helmet. According to CNN, there are oxygen masks in the capsule, much like on an airplane, in case the cabin becomes depressurized. The company hasn’t specified what Bezos or his companions will wear, however.

Both Nield and Logsdon said the chance of a cabin leak is very small. So the decision to wear a spacesuit or not depends mostly on the design of the capsule. If it has especially thick skin and strong windows, and if its systems can accommodate hiccups and technical errors without endangering the passengers, then flying without a spacesuit could be safe.

When it comes to flying tourists, it may even be better to skip the spacesuit, since first-time fliers often throw up during launch or landing.

“Especially if you are not a trained and experienced astronaut, wearing a spacesuit could be riskier if you got sick,” Nield said.

If you weren’t sufficiently trained to operate the spacesuit, you could choke on your own vomit.

A fully automated flight with no pilots isn’t necessarily a safety issue

blue origin new shepard crew capsule interior mockup
An interior view of Blue Origin’s Crew Capsule mockup at the 33rd Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado, April 5, 2017.

New Shepard conducts its flights autonomously.

“Its design does not allow anybody to do much flying,” Logsdon said.

That’s not necessarily more risky than a rocket that requires a pilot, as long as the passengers are properly trained on what to do in an emergency.

Still, this fully automated launch system is relatively new, and lots of things can go wrong during early flights. Rocket failures can often be traced back to small errors across all kinds of hardware and software. It is rocket science, after all.

“Until we get lots of experience, like we’ve had with millions of airplane flights over the years, then there’s going to be some learning involved. And we’re going to get some surprises along the way. And there’s going to be some more accidents or incidents in future years,” Nield said. “With cars and boats and planes and trains, people die every year. And spaceflight is not going to be any different when it comes to that.”

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Winning bid for a seat on Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin spacecraft goes for $28 million

jeff bezos inside new shepard crew capsule
Jeff Bezos inside a New Shepard Crew Capsule mockup.

  • The first tourist on Blue Origin’s New Shepard spacecraft will pay $28 million for the trip to the edge of space.
  • The company began taking bids last month for a seat on the spacecraft in its first crewed trip set for July 20.
  • The winner of the auction will fly on the spacecraft with Jeff Bezos and his brother for 11 minutes.

The winning bid for a seat on Blue Origin’s first-ever space tourism flight came in at an eye-popping $28 million during a Saturday live auction.

The winner will be joining Blue Origin’s founder Jeff Bezos on the New Shepard spacecraft for an 11-minute trip to the edge of space scheduled to blast off on July 20. The name of the winner shelling out the $28 million will be released in coming weeks, the company said.

Bezos announced on Monday he would be aboard the New Shepard’s first flight with a full human crew that will include his brother, Mark Bezos. The Amazon founder has said he intends to spend more time focusing on Blue Origin after he steps down as Amazon CEO later this year.

Bidding on Saturday opened at $4.8 million and quickly shot up to $28 million. Blue Origin opened the auction for a seat on the inaugural crewed New Shepard flight on May 5 and more than 7,000 people from 159 countries registered, the company said on Saturday. Some of those bidders will be contacted about taking a seat on future space flights, the company said.

The money raised from the auction will go towards Blue Origin’s foundation, Club for the Future, which the company says will contribute towards the development of life in space and inspire future generations to pursue careers in science.

In order to qualify for the “Astronaut Experience,” participants must meet a series of requirements set forth by Blue Origin, including the ability to deal with heights, walk on uneven surfaces, and handle up to three times the individual’s weight. The participant will fill out a long series of waivers, as well as complete a special Blue Origin training program.

Bezos and the rest of the crew will float around the cabin of the spacecraft for just three minutes before strapping in again for the descent back to the ground.

Blue Origin, founded in 2000, plans to use this launch system to carry tourists up to the edge of space. New Shepard’s goal is simple: Give paying customers the ride of their lives. Passengers will get a few minutes of stunning views out of the largest windows of any spaceship in the world.

The company has yet to release any ticket prices or specifics related to its plans for full capacity space tourism. But, Virgin Galactic – Sir Richard Branson’s space tourism company – has sold tickets for about $250,000 to about 600 passengers. Bezos has said in the past that tickets to ride on Blue Origin’s New Shepard tourism rocket will have competitive prices with the other space-tourism company.

An initial video announcing the space tickets has footage of Bezos visiting the New Shepard capsule after the company’s latest test flight earlier in April.

“Guys, how exciting is this – come on!” Bezos said in the video, labeled “It’s time.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

Miami and Space – the new battlegrounds for tech’s top egos

Hello, and welcome to this week’s edition of the Insider Tech newsletter, where we break down the biggest news in tech, including:

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Soundtrack: This week’s newsletter has been specially designed to be consumed while listening to David Bowie’s “Starman.”


This week: Tech egos are clashing, from the shores of Miami to the depths of space

Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson
Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson

For more than a year, Silicon Valley techies have abandoned their homeland and poured into Miami in search of startup El Dorado. As Candy Cheng reports, the influx of newcomers is causing friction with the locals.

If not Miami, then space. There’s another group of brash Silicon Valley adventurers setting off for new horizons, and lucky for them, where they’re going there are no locals to clash with (we think).

Meanwhile, rival space entrepreneur Sir Richard Branson may try to beat Bezos to orbit by blasting off in a Virgin Galactic spaceship on July 4.

Elon Musk, the other space race billionaire, has yet to announce plans for his own imminent trip. But chatter has centered on a prediction from a 1953 book that describes a leader called “Elon” leading humans to Mars– seriously.

And a former Blue Origin employee has just raised $650 million to build 3D-printed rockets.

Even Palantir, the data analysis company, has a spacebound employee. Kelli Gerardi 32-year old Tik Tok star and logistics expert at Palantir, will be aboard a separate Virgin Galactic flight expected to launch in 2022.

“Less than a thousand humans have ever been to space – fewer than 100 women, only a handful of moms – and my 3-year-old is going to watch her mommy become one of them,” Gerardi told Insider.


Startups to watch

Li Jin, Hans Tung, Gabby Cazeau, and Mike Duboe on a purple background.
Li Jin, Hans Tung, Gabby Cazeau, and Mike Duboe.

Insider asked dozens of top VCs to name the most promising Startups of 2021. They were asked to nominate startups they had invested in as well as ones where they had no financial ties. And they delivered an exciting list of companies, across all stages from newly launched to unicorns, each thriving for different reasons.

In our first on a series of stories of the Most Promising Startups of 2021, we present a list of 46, many of whom were named by multiple VCs as being companies to watch this year.

Read the full story:

46 of the most promising startups of 2021, according to top VCs


Snaphot: Polaroid’s life lesson

Yesterday’s innovative breakthrough is today’s retro tchotchke, and the miniaturized version of Polaroid’s classic instant camera is a fun, and instructive, reminder of the olden times.

The tiny plastic Polaroid Go spits out photos that gradually, over a period of 10 to 15 minutes, develop all by themselves. Once upon a time, that was a big deal – it meant you didn’t have to take your film to be developed at a shop and then wait a couple of days to get prints of your photos.

The Polaroid Go

For today’s digital generation, there’s nothing special about being able to view pictures right away, of course.

But perhaps the Polaroid has something better than mere nostalgia to offer Gen Z.

Scarcity is an increasingly foreign concept to those living in a time of super-low interest rates, bottomless social media feeds, on-demand streaming movies, and smartphone cameras that take infinite selfies. With a film camera – even a toy-like instant camera – you only get a finite number of pictures. Each shot needs to count. Imagine that.


Recommended readings:

‘I was pregnant and then I wasn’t.’ How a miscarriage led a startup employee to build a company that’s now funded by Alexis Ohanian’s Seven Seven Six.

VMware is in an all-out sprint to grow its $1 billion security business, doubling its engineering staff to compete with cyber giants like Microsoft and Cisco

Travis Kalanick’s CloudKitchens loses second exec in a month

This pitch deck persuaded Softbank to make its first banking tech investment, sending Zeta’s valuation rocking to $1.45 billion

IBM salaries revealed: How much the $132 billion tech giant paid software engineers, business analysts, and more in 2021

Top executives at Magic Leap are leaving the company in the biggest leadership shakeup under CEO Peggy Johnson


Not necessarily in tech:

Subway cofounder Fred DeLuca ruled the company like a demigod and pursued wives of franchisees. How one man sent the world’s biggest fast-food chain into a tailspin.


Thanks for reading, and if you like this newsletter, tell your friends and colleagues they can sign up here to receive it.

– Alexei

Read the original article on Business Insider

The bidding to blast into space with Jeff Bezos on a Blue Origin rocket will start at $4.8 million

Jeff Bezos is seen speaking beside a photo of Blue Origin's New Shepard rocket lifting off.
Jeff Bezos (left) is set to launch aboard the New Shepard rocket (right) on July 20.

  • Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin is auctioning a seat on its New Shepard space flight on July 20.
  • The live auction will take place on Saturday, and pre-auction bidding has closed at $4.8 million.
  • Bezos will be on the flight alongside the auction winner.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Bidding for a seat alongside Jeff Bezos onboard New Shepard, the Blue Origin rocket due to blast off on July 20, has officially closed ahead of a live auction on Saturday.

The highest bid at the closing of registration on Thursday was $4.8 million, according to Blue Origin’s website. The live auction will take place on Saturday, June 12, at 12:45 p.m. EDT.

Jeff Bezos, who owns Blue Origin, announced on Monday he would be on the first human flight of New Shepard along with his brother. Pre-auction bidding has been open since May, and before Bezos’ announcement the highest bid was $2.8 million.

Read more: An ex-engineer from Jeff Bezos’ space company has raised $650 million for his rocket-printing startup above a $4 billion valuation

The flight will last just 11 minutes, taking the passengers to the edge of space. Bezos and the other passengers will be weightless and able to float about the cabin for roughly three minutes, as reported by Insider’s Morgan McFall-Johnsen.

New Shepard can carry six people, but so far only Bezos, his brother Mark Bezos, and the auction winner have been confirmed as passengers.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Unconfirmed report suggests Branson may try to beat Bezos into space – and Virgin Galactic didn’t deny it

jeff bezos richard branson thumb 4x3
Jeff Bezos (left) and Richard Branson (right) may be in a very tight space race.

The billionaire space race appears to be in full swing, and it’s getting close. Jeff Bezos and Sir Richard Branson may both have the edge of space in their sights next month.

Bezos announced on Monday that he plans to fly into space aboard the New Shepard rocket developed by Blue Origin, the aerospace company he founded in 2000. The launch is set for July 20.

The following day, a report from Douglas Messier, who runs the longtime space blog Parabolic Arc, indicated that Virgin Galactic may be racing to launch its own founder, Branson, before Bezos. A “source who requested anonymity” told Messier that the company plans to fly Branson on a test flight of its SpaceShipTwo rocket plane over the July 4 weekend. That would poise Branson to beat Bezos to space by a narrow two weeks.

According to Messier’s source, the company began making those plans in response to Blue Origin setting the date for its first crewed flight. Blue Origin made that announcement on May 5 – long before Bezos shared that he would be on board.

Insider was not able to independently confirm Messier’s report. But in a statement to Insider, a spokesperson for Virgin Galactic did not deny the report’s claims.

“At this time, we have not determined the date of our next flight,” the spokesperson said.

Branson’s flight is “expected in the summer months,” the spokesperson added, as is a separate test flight with four “mission specialists” – employees playing the role of future passengers.

Virgin Galactic has previously stated that the mission specialists would fly before Branson. But as of Wednesday, the spokesperson did not respond to a question about which of the two flights would come first.

“One could easily imagine just sort of swapping the flights, or having Richard Branson fly in one of those four seats, just as a test subject, if you will,” George Nield, a former associate administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, where he led its Office of Commercial Space Transportation, told Insider.

Branson has “been in some pretty risky things in his career,” Nield added. “And he obviously believes in this program. If he’s comfortable that everything’s good and is willing to go himself, then more power to him.”

“It’s kind of amusing, these billionaires entertaining themselves by being on the first flights of their vehicles,” John Logsdon, the founder of George Washington University’s Space Policy Institute and a former member of the NASA Advisory Council, told Insider. “Starship is supposed to do an orbital test, too. Is Elon [Musk] going to take the bait and fly on that?”

Launching Branson by July 4 is ‘very doable’

Virgin Galactic
A SpaceShipTwo space plane returns to Earth after a supersonic flight.

Virgin Galactic could easily get through the paperwork to fly Branson by July 4, according to Nield.

“To me, it looks absolutely very doable,” he said, though he emphasized that he is not privy to communications between Virgin Galactic and the FAA, which licenses commercial rocket launches.

Virgin Galactic might have to modify its license with the FAA in order to fly Branson. The modification would allow the company to fly “participants” as well as crew members (in this case, pilots and mission specialists). But Nield says that modification would be simple and quick, as long as the data from the last flight doesn’t reveal any major issues.

“The change in the license is just to say: ‘delete paragraph five,'” Nield said. “So it’s not a big deal.”

Branson could even get a new role as a crew member – acting as a mission specialist, for example. Then Virgin Galactic may not have to modify its license at all in order to fly him.

“In my opinion, there is nothing preventing Richard Branson from also flying as a member of the flight crew,” Nield said. “He is an employee of the company, and they can assign him whatever duties they want to. That’s not something the FAA gets involved in. That’s up to the company.”

When Insider asked about the report, an FAA spokesperson declined to comment on whether Virgin Galactic was pursuing a launch next month. Instead, the agency pointed out the “participant” license modification.

It’s not clear how much Virgin Galactic would have to change or speed up its original plans in order to get Branson to space before Bezos.

“If you hurry there’s always the possibility of cutting corners, but the people that are managing the flight have a pretty high incentive not to kill their boss,” Logsdon said.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Jeff Bezos will spend just 3 minutes in space, without a pilot. His launch will be unlike any prior US spaceflight.

jeff bezos new shepard launch blue origin thumb 4x3
Jeff Bezos (left) is set to launch aboard the New Shepard rocket (right) on July 20.

Jeff Bezos is preparing to rocket into space on July 20, but he won’t be there for very long. With Earth shining outside the windows, Bezos will float around the cabin of his company’s New Shepard spaceship for just three minutes before he has to strap into his seat again and fall back to the ground.

Blue Origin, the rocket company that Bezos founded in 2000, plans to use this launch system to carry tourists up to the edge of space. New Shepard’s goal is simple: give paying customers the ride of their lives. Passengers will get a few minutes of stunning views out of the largest windows of any spaceship in the world.

This is the first launch system designed for that purpose, and Bezos will be among the first people to fly on it, alongside his brother Mark and the highest bidder for the third seat. Combined, these factors make this flight unlike any other before it.

“Ever since I was five years old, I’ve dreamed of traveling to space,” Bezos said in a Monday Instagram post announcing his plans to rocket into space.

“I want to go on this flight because it’s a thing I wanted to do all my life. It’s an adventure – it’s a big deal for me,” he added in an accompanying video.

In this dream-realizing flight of Bezos’s, there will be no pilot, since the process is automated – and perhaps not even spacesuits either. Here’s what to expect.

3 minutes of weightlessness

new shepard reusable rocket launch 2016 blue origin
Blue Origin’s reusable New Shepard suborbital rocket launches toward space in 2016.

On launch day, Bezos, his brother, and a to-be-determined multimillionaire will climb into the round, spacious cabin of the New Shepard and strap in. If all goes according to plan, the rocket will then fire its engines, spewing flame and smoke across the plains of West Texas, in order to heave itself off the launchpad and into the skies.

As New Shepard screams through the atmosphere, the force of its climb and the pull of Earth’s gravity will pin the Bezos brothers and their guest into their reclining seats.

After just three minutes, they will suddenly feel weightless. They’ll have another three minutes to unbuckle and float around the cabin, drifting from one window to another. Those windows, which make up one-third of the capsule’s surface, will show the passengers the curve of Earth on one side of the spaceship and the blackness of space on the other.

BlueOrigin_NS15_03_WindowView
The view from space on New Shepard’s 15th flight, April 14, 2021.

Astronauts have a term for the feeling of awe this view of Earth can inspire: “the Overview Effect.”

“When we look down at the Earth from space, we see this amazing, indescribably beautiful planet. It looks like a living, breathing organism. But it also, at the same time, looks extremely fragile,” Ron Garan, an astronaut who spent 177 days in space, explained in a 2013 documentary film titled “Overview.”

He added: “Anybody else who’s ever gone to space says the same thing because it really is striking and it’s really sobering to see this paper-thin layer and to realize that that little paper-thin layer is all that protects every living thing on Earth from death, basically.”

Briefly, for just a minute or two, the New Shepard spaceship should clear the Kármán line – an imaginary boundary 62 miles (100 kilometers) above sea level, where space begins.

Then as gravity takes hold again and the spaceship begins to fall back to Earth, Bezos and his co-passengers will strap in for a high-speed plunge through the atmosphere. Then the capsule should deploy three parachutes – likely giving the passengers a significant jerk as the chutes balloon into the air to brake the spaceship’s fall.

blue origin new shepard crew capsule landing parachute
The New Shepard crew capsule parachutes to a landing at Blue Origin’s Launch Site One in Texas, January 14, 2021.

After that, the parachutes should carry the capsule to a gentle landing in the Texas desert, where a recovery crew will be waiting to retrieve the Bezoses and their companion.

Meanwhile, the rocket booster will fall back to Earth separately, fire its engines to slow itself to about 5 mph, and self-land on a concrete pad, to be restored and fly again another day.

blue origin new shepard rocket booster landing
The New Shepard booster lands after the vehicle’s fifth flight, May 2, 2019.

The whole journey will last about 11 minutes. That’s because New Shepard is a suborbital rocket. It’s too small, and its engines don’t have enough thrust, to push itself into orbit. So any tourists riding it, including Bezos, will just get to peek above the edge of space.

Another rocket company, Virgin Galactic, has flown people on similar suborbital flights before. But their missions require pilots to land their plane-like vehicle. For New Shepard, the entire flight is automated, so there will be no pilots or professional astronauts on board.

No spacesuits, either?

blue origin new shepard test flight mannequin skywalker
A dummy called Mannequin Skywalker flies onboard the New Shepard in a Blue Origin flight suit, January 14, 2021.

Blue Origin hasn’t specified whether Bezos or his companions will wear a pressurized spacesuit and helmet during their flight. But the company’s website indicates that New Shepard passengers will wear only a jumpsuit.

NASA astronauts and their international counterparts all wear pressurized spacesuits when they launch or land. NASA started requiring this after the Challenger disaster in 1986, when the Space Shuttle broke apart during launch, killing all seven crew members.

Spacesuits probably would not have saved the people aboard Challenger, but they could save lives if a space capsule happens to experience a cabin leak yet remain intact.

Blue Origin did not respond to multiple requests for comment on the upcoming flight. The New Shepard has flown successfully 15 times and has twice tested an emergency-escape system that should jettison the capsule and its passengers away from a failing rocket.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Jeff Bezos will soon take an 11-minute flight aboard a rocket his space exploration company built. Here’s how his childhood obsession with space led to Blue Origin’s unprecedented spaceflight.

jeff bezos blue origin blue moon
  • Jeff Bezos will be aboard Blue Origin’s first human spaceflight in July.
  • The Amazon CEO and Blue Origin founder has been a space enthusiast since childhood.
  • In 2013, he traveled out to sea for three weeks to retrieve pieces of the Apollo 11 spacecraft.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

On July 20, Jeff Bezos will be among the first human passengers to fly aboard New Shepard, a spacecraft built by his space exploration company, Blue Origin.

While it’s an unusual – and potentially risky – experiment, it’s not a very surprising one: Bezos has been obsessed with space since childhood.

“You’ve been passionate about space your whole life, but this is not just a plaything for you,” Mark Bezos said during an interview with his brother in 2017.

“No. God, no,” Bezos replied.

Bezos founded Blue Origin in 2000 with the goal of democratizing human spaceflight. The company has grown slowly over the years, but in 2015, it completed a remarkable feat, one Bezos will soon attempt: Flying the New Shepard rocket 62 miles above Earth and landing it safely on the ground.

In a few weeks, Bezos will embark on his own 11-minute trip outside of the Earth’s gravitational pull, decades after he first became obsessed with space travel. Here’s where Bezos’ passion for space began.

Bezos’ interest in space stems from his maternal grandfather

The lore around Bezos’ childhood is well-known by this point: Every summer, he would travel to the South Texas ranch belonging to his grandfather, Lawrence Preston Gise.

According to Brad Stone’s book, “Amazon Unbound,” Gise had spent the 1950s and 1960s working on space technology and missile defense systems for the Atomic Energy Commission, a federal agency that was created in 1946 to manage the use of nuclear energy for both civilian and military applications.

Bezos, it seems, developed his passion for space during those summers with his grandfather. There, he would watch Apollo launches and read science fiction books from the library, according to Stone’s book.

Bezos used his high school valedictorian speech to talk about colonizing space

By the time he was in high school in South Florida, Bezos had told his friends that he wanted to be a space entrepreneur, and already had big plans to make space travel a part of his career plans, according to a 1999 Wired profile.

He attended a space initiative for high schoolers at NASA’s campus in Hunstville, Alabama, and later started a summer camp for elementary school students that had a heavy emphasis on science – including interstellar travel and space colonies, according to Wired.

When Bezos became valedictorian of his senior class in 1982, he delivered a speech about overpopulation and pollution. His solution to those existential threats, according to Stone’s book, was to send civilization to space.

″[Bezos] wants to build space hotels, amusement parks, yachts and colonies for two or three million people orbiting around the earth,” a write-up of Bezos’ speech by the Miami Herald said. Then, it said, he would turn around and preserve Earth as one massive, national park.

jeff bezos star trek
Jeff Bezos attends the premiere of “Star Trek Beyond” in 2016.

Bezos has long been obsessed with science fiction about space travel

Bezos’ love of science fiction – particularly “Star Trek” – is evident in many of his business pursuits. During the early days of Amazon, he considered naming the company “MakeItSo.com,” a reference to a line from “Star Trek” character Captain Jean-Luc Picard.

Bezos played the role of an alien in the 2016 film “Star Trek Beyond,” and at Blue Origin’s headquarters in Kent, Washington, there’s a model of the Starship Enterprise, the spaceship in the original “Star Trek” movies, according to Stone’s book.

To top it all off, Amazon’s arguably most popular product was inspired by “Star Trek” too. According to Stone’s book, beginning in the early 2010s, Bezos started talking about wanting to build a computer that worked like a personal assistant and could answer any question – that wish became Amazon’s Echo devices, which are powered by the Alexa smart assistant.

Bezos has traveled to the bottom of the ocean to retrieve pieces of Apollo 11

In 2013, Bezos, his brother, his brother-in-law, and his parents spent three weeks at sea recovering pieces of the engine of the Apollo 11 spacecraft, which took the first humans to the moon.

“We’ve seen an underwater wonderland – an incredible sculpture garden of twisted F-1 engines that tells the story of a fiery and violent end, one that serves testament to the Apollo program,” Bezos wrote of the experience.

After being sent to conservationists, the artifacts were installed at the Museum of Flight in Seattle.

Jeff Bezos Blue Origin

Bezos is stepping aside as Amazon CEO in favor of spending more time working on Blue Origin

When Bezos announced in February that he will step down as CEO of Amazon this year, he said he planned to spend more time on philanthropy, as well as his two other major endeavors: The Washington Post, which he purchased 2013, and Blue Origin.

But Bezos had hinted years earlier that space travel was rapidly becoming his focus.

“I get increasing conviction with every passing year that Blue Origin, the space company, is the most important work that I’m doing,” he said in 2018 during an interview with Axel Springer CEO Mathias Döpfner. (Axel Springer is Insider’s parent company.)

Bezos added that he believes if he doesn’t pursue space travel, “we will eventually end up with a civilization of stasis,” which he said he finds “demoralizing.” It’s his generation’s role, he said, to lower the barrier of entry to space travel.

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Jeff Bezos is heading to space, and he’s doing it before his main rival, Elon Musk. It’s the latest development in a 15-year feud between 2 of the world’s most powerful CEOs.

BI Graphics Jeff Bezos vs Elon Musk
Elon Musk, left, and Jeff Bezos.

  • Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos, the two richest people in the world, have been rivals for 15 years.
  • Musk has called Bezos a copycat and made digs about his rocket company, Blue Origin.
  • Now, Bezos is heading to space himself aboard Blue Origin’s New Shepard spacecraft.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Over the last 15 years, two of the world’s most high-profile CEOs, Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos, have been engaged in a simmering rivalry.

The two execs have sparred over their respective space ambitions – Musk runs SpaceX, while Bezos owns Blue Origin – but it hasn’t stopped there: Musk has called out Bezos for running what he deemed a monopoly, and has called Bezos a copycat for his self-driving car interests.

Musk and Bezos are two of the most powerful CEOs in the world. Bezos is currently the wealthiest living person and runs Amazon’s sprawling empire while also involving himself in Blue Origin’s quest to send people to the moon. Musk is a dual CEO, manning the ship at both Tesla and SpaceX. Over the years, their not-so-subtle rivalry has even given way to Twitter spats and name-calling.

Now, Bezos is surpassing Musk in a major way: by heading to space himself. Bezos announced that he will be on Blue Origin’s first human space flight in July alongside his younger brother, Mark.

Here’s how Musk’s and Bezos’ rivalry began and everything that’s happened since.

Back in the early 2000s, Jeff Bezos wasn’t yet the titan he is today.

jeff bezos young 2000

Bezos had launched Amazon five years prior, and the company had gone public in 1997. But Amazon wasn’t yet the powerhouse it would become — it was years before the company would launch Prime, start its own streaming service, or create its cloud infrastructure service, Amazon Web Services.

But Bezos had always been interested in space. He told the Miami Herald in 1982, after he graduated high school as valedictorian, that he wanted to create outer space colonies for millions of people.

As a result of that long-held interest in leaving Earth, Bezos launched Blue Origin in 2000, a new startup focused on human spaceflight. 

Elon Musk was already a millionaire several times over, but he hadn’t become CEO of Tesla yet.

peter thiel elon musk early paypal
Peter Thiel, left, and Elon Musk, right, pose for a 1999 story about their company, PayPal.

Around the time Bezos was launching Blue Origin, Musk had already sold Zip2, a startup he launched with his brother, Kimbal, to Compaq for roughly $300 million. Musk was in the process of building PayPal, while would later be sold to eBay for $1.5 billion. 

Musk made about $160 million off the PayPal sale and used that money to launch SpaceX in 2002. 

“In the beginning, I actually wouldn’t even let my friends invest because everyone would lose their money,” Musk said during an interview at South by Southwest in 2018. “I thought I’d rather lose my own money.”

The Musk-Bezos rivalry appears to date back to 2004 when the two CEOs met for dinner.

jeff bezos 2000

By 2004, both Blue Origin and SpaceX were still in their infancy — neither company had completed any launches yet.

But that didn’t stop a rivalry from heating up: When the two met to discuss their respective reusable rocket ambitions it apparently did not go well. 

“I actually did my best to give good advice, which he largely ignored,” Musk said after the meeting, according to Christian Davenport’s book, “The Space Barons.”

Earlier this year, Trung Phan, a writer for the business newsletter The Hustle, tweeted a photo of Musk and Bezos smiling and sitting in a restaurant. Phan said the photo was from 2004, meaning it may have been taken at that fateful dinner.

Musk responded to the photo, tweeting, “Wow, hard to believe that was 17 years ago!”

From 2004 onward, Musk and Bezos appeared to keep to themselves. But their rivalry continued in 2013 when things became contentious over leasing a NASA launchpad.

elon musk ignition conference 2013

In 2013, SpaceX tried to get exclusive use of a NASA launchpad. Blue Origin (along with SpaceX rival United Launch Alliance) filed a formal protest with the government to prevent SpaceX from using the pad — Bezos proposed converting it “into a commercial spaceport available to all launch companies.”

Musk called the move a “phony blocking tactic” and took another swipe at Blue Origin.

“[Blue Origin] has not yet succeeded in creating a reliable suborbital spacecraft, despite spending over 10 years in development,” Musk told Space News at the time. “If they do somehow show up in the next five years with a vehicle qualified to NASA’s human rating standards that can dock with the Space Station, which is what Pad 39A is meant to do, we will gladly accommodate their needs.”

“Frankly, I think we are more likely to discover unicorns dancing in the flame duct,” he added.

SpaceX eventually won the right to take over the pad

In 2014, the two companies got into a patent battle when Blue Origin was granted a patent for drone ships, which are used for landing rocket boosters. SpaceX petitioned to invalidate the patent.

SpaceX drone ship
Space X’s Falcon 9 aboard its landing platform ship.

Blue Origin’s ownership of the patent would mean SpaceX would need to pay to use the technology. SpaceX argued that the science in the patent was “old hat,” given that the concept of drone ships has been around for decades.

A judge sided with SpaceX, leading to Blue Origin withdrawing most of the claims in the patent.

In recent years, Musk and Bezos have been more public about their feud, taking their rivalry to Twitter.

Jeff Bezos Blue Origin

Both execs have seized on opportunities to take shots at the other, most often sniping at each other over reusable rockets. After Blue Origin successfully landed its New Shepard rocket in 2015, Bezos tweeted a video calling it “the rarest of beasts — a used rocket.” 

Musk responded, saying SpaceX had performed the feat three years prior. 

When SpaceX landed its Falcon 9 spacecraft, Bezos took the opportunity to needle Musk on Twitter.

 

The feud isn’t just about space ambitions, however. Musk has taken issue with Blue Origin’s hiring practices and has taunted Bezos in interviews.

elon musk spacex

Musk told his biographer, Ashlee Vance, that Blue Origin has repeatedly tried to snag talent away from SpaceX.

“Blue Origin does these surgical strikes on specialized talent offering like double their salaries,” Musk said in Vance’s 2015 biography. “I think it’s unnecessary and a bit rude.”

Musk also revealed that SpaceX set up an email filter for the words “blue” and “origin,” according to Space News.

When the BBC asked Musk about Bezos in 2016, he responded, “Jeff who?”

Musk is known for being outspoken on Twitter, and that has included jabs at Bezos.

elon musk
Elon Musk.

Musk has repeatedly and publicly called Bezos a “copycat” — once after Amazon announced its plan to launch internet-beaming satellites, and again when Amazon acquired self-driving-taxi company Zoox.

Musk poked at Bezos in 2019 after the unveiling of Blue Origin’s concept for a lunar-landing vehicle, called Blue Moon.

“Putting the word ‘Blue’ on a ball is questionable branding,” he tweeted.

Musk later mocked up a screenshot of a New York Times article that changed the name from “Blue Moon” to “Blue Balls.” 

“Oh stop teasing, Jeff 😉,” Musk wrote

For his part, Bezos has been less overt about his distaste for Musk and SpaceX, but he’s made veiled comments about his thoughts on the company’s plans.

jeff bezos blue origin blue moon

While Bezos has stopped short of calling out Musk directly, he has taken aim at Musk’s biggest ambition: colonizing Mars, the main goal of SpaceX. 

Bezos’ focus is on getting humans to the moon, and he’s described the idea of reaching Mars as “un-motivating.”

“Go live on the top of Mount Everest for a year first and see if you like it, because it’s a garden paradise compared to Mars,” Bezos said in 2019.

During his presentation for Blue Moon, Bezos referenced SpaceX’s Mars ambitions once again, titling a slide about Mars “FAR, FAR AWAY.”

In July, Musk appeared to make yet another dig at Bezos – this time about his age – in an interview with the New York Times.

Elon Musk

In a wide-ranging Times interview, Musk, 49, took the opportunity to comment on Blue Origin, appearing to imply that Jeff Bezos, 56, is too old and Blue Origin too slow to ever make real progress.  

“The rate of progress is too slow and the amount of years he has left is not enough, but I’m still glad he’s doing what he’s doing with Blue Origin,” Musk said. 

 

Though the pair’s main point of contention appears to be space, Musk has made other pointed remarks about Amazon, recently calling the company a monopoly.

elon musk
Tesla CEO Elon Musk leaves Manhattan federal court after a hearing on his fraud settlement with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) in New York City, U.S. April 4, 2019.

After Amazon’s publishing service refused to publish a book about the coronavirus by writer Alex Berenson, Musk tweeted at Bezos that the situation was “insane” and called for Amazon to be broken up. 

Musk’s comments were in response to Amazon’s Kindle Direct Publishing service refusing to publish Berenson’s book titled “Unreported Truths about COVID-19 and Lockdowns.” Berenson tweeted a screenshot of an email he says he received from Amazon and said the company “censored” his book. The screenshot appeared to show the publishing division saying the book does not comply with its guidelines.

Amazon later told Business Insider the book was removed in error and would be reinstated.  

Last spring, Blue Origin and SpaceX were both asked to submit designs for lunar landers to NASA for a mission to return humans to the moon by 2024.

Jeff Bezos Elon Musk
Jeff Bezos (left) and Elon Musk.

Along with a third company, Dynetics, Bezos’ and Musk’s companies were asked to compete for a multibillion-dollar contract with NASA.

All three companies had 10 months to work on their designs for a mission known as Artemis — the mission would be the first time a manned spacecraft has been sent to the moon since the Apollo 17 mission in 1972. 

It’s possible Bezos has softened his stance on SpaceX, however: After the rocket company conducted a test of its Starship spacecraft in December, Bezos publicly complimented the company for its ambitious attempt.

elon musk spacex starship sn8 serial number 8 steel rocket ship prototype boca chica south texas sunset sunrise getty 4x3
SpaceX, founded by Elon Musk, is building and launching Starship prototypes in Boca Chica, Texas.

SpaceX launched the rocket thousands of feet in the air during during a 7-minute test flight, but the rocket exploded during landing.

Still, the audacious test garnered praise from Musk’s space rival, Bezos. 

“Anybody who knows how hard this stuff is is impressed by today’s Starship test,” Bezos wrote in an Instagram post, accompanied by a low-resolution photo of the rocket. “Big congrats to the whole @SpaceX team. I’m confident they’ll be back at it soon.”

A post shared by Jeff Bezos (@jeffbezos)

 

In January, Musk overtook Bezos to become the richest person in the world, but Bezos has since regained the top spot.

elon musk spacex launch.JPG

Tesla hit all-time highs in the stock market in recent weeks, gradually nudging Musk’s wealth skyward — first, past Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg, and then, past Bezos. 

Bezos has since regained the lead with a net worth of $187 billion

Musk is third, after LVMH CEO Bernard Arnault, with a fortune worth $166 billion

In April, NASA announced that SpaceX is the sole recipient of the contract for landing humans on the moon, worth $2.9 billion. The decision infuriated Blue Origin, which is now challenging NASA’s decision.

Jeff Bezos

According to The New York Times, Blue Origin filed a 50-page protest with the Government Accountability Office, challenging NASA’s decision as “flawed.”

NASA had initially said it would award the contract to two companies, but budget concerns and a lack of Congressional funding meant it could only choose SpaceX.

Blue Origin told CNBC that NASA’s decision was unfair because it had “moved the goalposts at the last minute” and had negotiated a proposed price with SpaceX, but not with Blue Origin. 

Musk responded to Blue Origin’s protests with a thinly veiled jab about male anatomy.

Elon Musk Starship
Elon Musk, left, and SpaceX’s Starship rocket.

In response to The New York Times report, Musk tweeted: “Can’t get it up (to orbit) lol.”

He followed the tweet up with the photoshopped image of Blue Origin’s lunar lander that changed the name from “Blue Moon” to “Blue Balls.” 

Bezos announced in June that he’s making a major commitment to the future of Blue Origin: He’s heading to space aboard one of his own spacecrafts.

Jeff Bezos Mark Bezos

On July 20, Bezos and his younger brother, Mark, will take an 11-minute flight aboard Blue Origin’s New Shepard spacecraft. The flight will send the crew 62 miles above the Earth’s surface before returning to Earth. 

“Ever since I was 5 years old, I’ve dreamed of traveling to space,” Bezos said in a video posted on Instagram. “I want to go on this flight because it’s a thing I wanted to do all my life. It’s an adventure — it’s a big deal for me.” 

The short trip will be Blue Origin’s first human flight — SpaceX launched its first human passengers into orbit in May 2020. While it’s likely Musk could have gone to space himself by now, the trip would carry more risk for his business dealings, given that he’s also the CEO of a public company. Bezos, on the other hand, will step down as CEO of Amazon on July 5, two weeks before his visit to space. 

Read the original article on Business Insider

Meet Mark Bezos, the younger brother of Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos who’s about to join him aboard Blue Origin’s first human space flight

Jeff Bezos Mark Bezos
Mark Bezos, left, and Jeff Bezos.

  • Jeff Bezos announced that his brother, Mark, will join him on a Blue Origin flight to space.
  • Mark, who is six years Jeff’s junior, is a volunteer fireman who has his own private equity firm.
  • He and Jeff are the “closest friends.” Jeff he described him as the “funniest guy in my life.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

On July 20, Jeff Bezos and his younger brother, Mark, are heading to space.

The Amazon founder announced Monday that he and his brother will be on the first human flight of the New Shepard spacecraft, which is made by Blue Origin, Bezos’ space exploration company. The company is currently auctioning one of the six available seats aboard the flight, which will last 11 minutes and take the spacecraft 62 miles above the Earth’s surface.

Bezos said in a video posted to Instagram that he’s wanted to go to space his whole life, and that he asked his brother to come along “because we’re closest friends.”

So who is the younger Bezos? Here are five things we know about him.

Mark Bezos is the youngest of the Bezos siblings

According to a 1999 Wired profile on Jeff Bezos, Mark Bezos is six years younger than his brother, who turned 57 in January. The brothers have a middle sister named Christina.

The Bezos siblings moved around a lot as kids, spending time in Albuquerque, Houston, and Pensacola, Florida. Their mother, Jackie, had Jeff as a teenager; their father, Mike, immigrated to the US from Cuba at age 15. The couple met while working at a local bank, and Mike Bezos became Jeff Bezos’ adoptive father.

He got his start in advertising and marketing

Mark Bezos attended Texas Christian University, graduating in 1992 with a degree in advertising and public relations, according to his LinkedIn page.

He got his start working at New York City ad firms like DDB and Saatchi & Saatchi. Then, in 1999, he founded and ran his own marketing company. The same year, he became a director at the Bezos Family Foundation, which was founded by Jackie and Mike Bezos.

In 2006, he began working at an organization called Robin Hood, not to be confused with the stock-trading app – Robin Hood is a New York-based nonprofit focused on fighting poverty. Bezos currently serves on Robin Hood’s leadership council.

Bezos is also the cofounder of private equity firm HighPost Capital.

He’s a volunteer firefighter

Bezos has been a volunteer with the Scarsdale Fire Department in Westchester County since 2005.

In 2011, Bezos gave a TED talk about being a firefighter, sharing a humorous story about being asked to do the unglamorous job of retrieving shoes for a woman whose house was on fire. But after hearing the woman’s appreciation, he said, he saw the importance of committing small acts of kindness and generosity.

“I would offer this reminder: Don’t wait,” Bezos said. “Don’t wait until you make your first million to make a difference in somebody’s life.”

He’s likely a millionaire several times over

Jeff Bezos’ parents invested invested $245,573 in Amazon in 1995, and while they haven’t publicly disclosed their Amazon holdings since 1999, they likely own millions of shares worth tens of billions of dollars, according to Bloomberg.

Mark and Christina also own shares in Amazon and are most likely worth several hundred million dollars apiece.

Last month, Mark put his Scarsdale home on the market for $11 million. The four-acre estate includes a main house with six bedrooms and four bathrooms, as well as a four-bedroom guest house. The property also includes a home theater, gym, wine cellar, and game room with a golf simulator.

Mark and his brother are close friends

In a Seattle Times profile on Jeff Bezos from 1999, Mark described what it feels like when your brother starts becoming famous.

“When your brother is all of a sudden one of these people who are being recognized, you look at him and try to imagine you’re seeing him for the first time,” said Mark Bezos. “(He’s) Jeff Bezos, the guy who started Amazon, as opposed to Jeff Bezos, the guy who used to make you tickle his feet.”

Mark interviewed Jeff onstage at a Summit leadership event in 2017 and joked about his brother’s astronomical wealth.

“If any of you do get confused, I’m the one with the smaller bank account to your left,” Mark said.

For his part, Jeff has described his brother as the “funniest guy in my life” and said that when they’re together – often drinking bourbon – “I just laugh continuously.”

The two brothers also support each other. According to the Seattle Times story, Jeff showed up at Mark’s first marathon in New York and started jogging with him at mile 25 to offer moral support, ducking out right before the finish line.

In the video about the upcoming spaceflight, Mark said he was “awestruck” that Jeff asked him to come.

“What a remarkable opportunity, not only to have this adventure, but to be able to do it with my best friend,” Mark said.

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Jeff Bezos says he’s flying into space with his brother on July 20

Jeff Bezos Amazon
Amazon and Blue Origin CEO Jeff Bezos.

  • Jeff Bezos announced he’s going into space with his brother Mark Bezos on July 20.
  • The pair will be on the first human flight of Blue Origin’s New Shepard spacecraft.
  • The 11-minute flight will have six seats in total, one of which is currently up for auction.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Jeff Bezos announced Monday that he and his brother Mark Bezos will be flying into space next month.

“Ever since I was five years old, I’ve dreamed of traveling to space,” Bezos posted on Instagram on Monday. “On July 20th, I will take that journey with my brother.”

The brothers will be flying on the first human flight of the New Shepard spacecraft, which is made by Jeff Bezos’ space-exploration company Blue Origin.

“I want to go on this flight because it’s a thing I wanted to do all my life. It’s an adventure, it’s a big deal for me,” Bezos said in a video posted to Instagram.

“I invited my brother to come on this first flight because we’re closest friends,” he added.

“I wasn’t even expecting him to say that he was going to be on the first flight, and then when he asked me to go along I was just awe-struck,” said Mark Bezos in the same video.

A post shared by Jeff Bezos (@jeffbezos)

Blue Origin is currently auctioning a seat on the same flight. The bidding for one of six seats on Blue Origin’s New Shepard spacecraft has reached $2.8 million with nearly 6,000 participants from 143 countries, the company told Insider in a statement.

Bidding is now live on Blue Origin’s website and finishes with a live online auction on June 12.

The 11-minute trip, which plans to blast the crew 62 miles above the Earth’s surface, will be the company’s first space tourism flight.

A maximum of six people can fit into the capsule, which sits on the top of the rocket booster. Once New Shepard reaches reaches a high altitude, the capsule would break away from the booster, reenter the atmosphere, and float back down to Earth with the help of parachutes.

Bezos founded Blue Origin in 2000, and said in a 2018 interview that it’s his “most important work.” When Bezos announced in February that he will be leaving his role as CEO of Amazon, he said Blue Origin was one of the projects to which he wants to devote more of his attention.

Bezos is set to step down as Amazon CEO on July 5.

Read the original article on Business Insider