Bitcoin is not overbought and could reach $75,000 before the current bull market ends, research from Kraken says

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Citi said bitcoin is at a “tipping point.”

  • Bitcoin is not yet in “overbought” territory and could reach $75,000 before the current bull cycle ends, Kraken says. 
  • According to historical price movements of bitcoin, the first quarter of 2021 could be met with massive gains for the token. 
  • Bitcoin is up 62% year-to-date as of Friday as it hovers just below $48,000.
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Bitcoin could gain much higher before the current bull market ends based on historical price movements, says a Kraken Intelligence market report published Friday.

Although bitcoin is quickly approaching resistance, it remains several tens of thousands of dollars away from entering into “overbought” territory, Kraken said. If bitcoin were to surpass $75,000 in the next few months, historical price action suggests bitcoin would then be close to the top of the cycle. 

The cryptocurrency has pulled back from its all-time high above $58,000 on February 21, but it still finished the month 37% higher. The coin is up 62% year-to-date as of Friday as it hovers just below $48,000.

According to Kraken, bitcoin is now trending in a manner most similar to the first quarter of 2013, bitcoin’s best first quarter on record. If the trend continues, the first quarter of 2021 “could be a historic quarter with a relatively outsized return.”

“By plotting a logarithmic growth curve that connects BTC’s prior market cycle tops (resistance) and bottoms (support) and by making assumptions about how severe BTC will correct upon hitting a cycle high, one will find that BTC likely has plenty of upside before entering a bear market,” the report says. 

The report comes as some investors voice concerns that bitcoin’s rapid acceleration is a clear sign the cryptocurrency is in a bubble waiting to burst. Michael Burry said the coin is a “speculative bubble that poses more risk than opportunity” in a tweet Monday that has now been deleted. 

On Wednesday Kraken CEO Jesse Powell told Bloomberg a $1 million as a price target within the next 10 years is “very reasonable.” 

 

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Bitcoin plunges 17% as record-shattering rally succumbs to valuation fears

Bitcoin Bubble

Bitcoin tumbled as much as 17% on Monday, to below $48,000.

On Sunday, the cryptocurrency hit a record of $58,042, bringing its year-to-date gain to over 100%. On Friday, it reached a market capitalization of $1 trillion.

Monday’s slide is a sign of the wariness of the cryptocurrency’s rapid ascent. Bears have long said bitcoin is in bubble territory, comparing the recent rally to what played out in 2017, when bitcoin plunged by 45% shortly after reaching highs. In 2020, bitcoin surged by 305%.

Will Hobbs, the chief investment officer of Barclays Wealth & Investments, told Insider that he was steering clear of the cryptocurrency because of its wild swings – a view that many money managers share.

Meanwhile, bitcoin has gained institutional support in the past few weeks with announcements from Tesla and Mastercard, among others.

MicroStrategy, the first corporation to directly purchase bitcoin, now owns 70,784 bitcoin, worth more than $3.5 billion. Michael Saylor, the CEO of the enterprise software company, has long advocated bitcoin, viewing the cryptocurrency as a hedge against a devaluation of the US dollar.

On Sunday, Saylor said in a tweet to his half a million followers, “It is only speculation if you don’t understand the technology or why you need it.”

As for Tesla, Dan Ives, an equity analyst at Wedbush Securities, estimated that the electric-car maker had racked up profits of $1 billion on its $1.5 billion bitcoin investment.

“Based on our calculations, we estimate that Tesla so far has made roughly $1 billion of profit over the last month from its Bitcoin investment given the skyrocketing price of Bitcoin, which now tops a trillion of market value,” Ives wrote in a note published Saturday.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has been a vocal supporter of the cryptocurrency, most recently describing it as “a less dumb form of liquidity than cash.” On Saturday, Musk did acknowledge that the price of bitcoin seemed high.

Many think that bitcoin’s dizzying rally could have been driven by buyers looking to hedge against inflation or simply by people trading the cryptocurrency.

Still, some bitcoin bulls have told Insider that they expect the cryptocurrency to rise even more, to as high as $250,000 in the next three years.

Read more: Bank of America says buy these 14 cheap stocks that are best positioned to soar on the strongest economic comeback in nearly 40 years

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Bitcoin plunges 8% as record-shattering rally succumbs to valuation fears

Bitcoin Bubble
Bitcoin replica coins are seen on November 13, 2017

Bitcoin tumbled 8% Monday to below $53,000.

The drop comes a day after the cryptocurrency hit a new record of $58,042 on Sunday, for a gain of over 100% year-to-date. The cryptocurrency on Friday reached a market capitalization of $1 trillion for the first time.

Monday’s slide is a sign of wariness of the cryptocurrency’s rapid ascent. Bears have long said bitcoin is in bubble territory, comparing the recent rally to what played out in 2017, when bitcoin plunged 45% shortly after reaching new highs. 

Will Hobbs, the CIO of Barclays Wealth & Investments, told Insider that he was steering clear of the cryptocurrency due to its wild swings, a view shared by many money managers.

Meanwhile, the last few weeks have seen bitcoin gain additional institutional support, from Tesla to Mastercard, among others.

MicroStrategy, the first corporation to directly purchase bitcoin, now owns 70,784 bitcoin, roughly worth more than $3.5 billion. Chief executive of the enterprise software company, Michael Saylor, has long been an advocate of bitcoin, viewing the cryptocurrency as a hedge against a potential devaluation of the US dollar. 

On Sunday, Saylor fired a tweet to his half a million followers: “It is only speculation if you don’t understand the technology or why you need it. #Bitcoin

As for Tesla, an equity analyst at Wedbush Securities estimates that the electric car maker has racked up paper profits worth $1 billion on its $1.5 billion bitcoin investment.

“Based on our calculations, we estimate that Tesla so far has made roughly $1 billion of profit over the last month from its Bitcoin investment given the skyrocketing price of Bitcoin, which now tops a trillion of market value,” analyst Dan Ives wrote in a note published Saturday.

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has been a vocal supporter of the cryptocurrency, most recently saying it’s a “less dumb form of liquidity than cash.” On Saturday, however, Musk did admit that the price of bitcoin “seems high.” 

Many believe the dizzying rally of the cryptocurrency in recent weeks could have been driven by a couple of things: buyers looking to hedge against inflation or simply by individuals trading the cryptocurrency.

Still, some bitcoin bulls have told Insider they expect the cryptocurrency to rise even further, as high as $250,000 in the next three years.

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An early bitcoin investor says the best time to buy is when nobody’s talking about it – and warns this isn’t the first crypto bubble

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The ultimate time to buy bitcoin is when no one is talking about it, according to one early adopter.

“The best time to buy bitcoin is whenever blood is on the street, everyone’s panicking, and no one’s talking about it,” the investor, who prefers to remain anonymous, told Insider in a phone interview from Manila, Philippines. “That’s the ultimate time to buy.”

In 2013, he made an initial purchase of 2.5 bitcoins from a seller who went by the name “Mang Sweeney” on LocalBitcoins.com when the cryptocurrency was trading at $100 per coin. “Mang” denotes a sign of respect in the local language in the Philippines. 

At the time, the platform allowed face-to-face meetings, after which the seller would transfer the cryptocurrency on-the-spot via their laptop or mobile. Mang Sweeney was already trading bitcoin when it was worth $10 a coin since speculative buying and selling was popular even then, according to the anonymous buyer.

Still, online interest in bitcoin in 2013-14 was nowhere near current levels. A chart below shows how Google searches for “bitcoin” in the Philippines have risen steadily since that period, then hit a peak in late 2017 when its price shot to a record high. It declined throughout 2018, but has returned in the last year.

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Read more: We spoke to Winklevoss-backed crypto platform Gemini about bitcoin, how to use stable coins, and why regulation won’t kill the boom in digital currencies

“People forget this isn’t the first bubble,” the investor said. “Until people understand the technology of it, it will always be a speculative asset.”

The early bitcoin buyer said he doesn’t advise friends and family to trade the token when it’s stuck in bubble territory. “When no one wants to touch it, that’s when you buy it. Not when people are talking about it,” he said.

Bitcoin’s deflationary nature discourages using it as a real currency, according to him. He lost 16 bitcoins in the Japanese cryptocurrency exchange Mt. Gox, one of the few exchanges that early adopters could trade on. It closed abruptly in 2014 following its collapse after hackers apparently raided the exchange. Almost 850,000 bitcoins belonging to investors were lost. 

“Finance guys” who are talking up the $100,000-$150,000 level, according to him, are actually unloading their bitcoin investments bit by bit while saying it’ll get to a certain price because some of them have already accumulated large amounts. 

Read more: Bubbly behavior is brewing in markets and Big Tech is reeling from 2 major political events this month – Three investing heavyweights that jointly manage almost $1 trillion break down the impact on these stocks and how to position

“The only reason I would tell people to just dabble in it is because it’s important to understand how it works and how to take care of it. If you don’t know your way around passwords or simple two-factor authentication then you’re going to get creamed. People will steal your bitcoin,” he warned.

But there are voices cautioning investors who are beginning to view bitcoin as digital gold.

“For bitcoin to be considered in a portfolio and to become an investable asset, similar to gold, the asset would need to improve the risk-return profile of that portfolio,” said Gerald Moser, chief market strategist at Barclays Private Bank. “This seems a tall order.”

While it is near impossible to forecast an expected return for bitcoin, its volatility makes the asset almost “uninvestable” from a portfolio perspective, he said.

Separately, Janet Yellen, nominee for treasury secretary, suggested on Tuesday that lawmakers curtail the use of cryptocurrencies as they’re used “mainly for illicit financing.”

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3 reasons why bitcoin has doubled in less than a month – and why experts think it won’t repeat its 2017 crash

Bitcoin
  • Bitcoin has more than doubled in less than a month, leaving analysts and investors stunned and concerned about a possible market bubble.
  • In many ways the token’s rally in recent months is crucially different than the surge seen three years ago, as buyers now range from casual day traders to fund managers handling billions of dollars in assets.
  • Easy monetary conditions and trillions of dollars in fiscal stimulus have led some investors to view the token as a new inflation hedge.
  • Detailed below are the factors driving bitcoin higher, and why experts don’t think the cryptocurrency will crash as it did in 2017.
  • Visit the Business Insider homepage for more stories.

It took nearly 11 years for bitcoin to reach $20,000 per coin for the first time in 2017. Just 22 days later, the world’s most popular cryptocurrency has surged another $20,000, and its momentum is so far holding strong.

Bitcoin’s rapid climb back in 2017 was swiftly followed by sell-offs that erased the bulk of its quickly earned gains. But no such trend has emerged this time around, and experts say a combination of factors fueled the token’s surge through 2020 and will continue to boost bitcoin in the new year.

Detailed below are three reasons behind bitcoin’s price spike, and a discussion of why it’s unlikely to suffer a crash similar to that seen two years ago.

(1) Fear of missing out

While passionate retail investors powered bitcoin’s 2017 rally, public companies sparked the token’s latest climb. MicroStrategy started a chain reaction when it bought $425 million worth of bitcoin in August and September, Jimmy Nguyen, president of the Bitcoin Association, told Insider. The move opened the door for other public companies to view bitcoin as a viable reserve asset.

Square followed in October with its own $50 million purchase. Still, it wasn’t until PayPal adopted bitcoin that prices began to rocket higher. The company announced on October 21 that it would allow its hundreds of millions of users to buy, sell, and hold bitcoin. The token leaped to its highest level since July 2019 as investors saw the adoption as a key step forward for bitcoin’s widespread use.

Read more: The CIO of a $500 million crypto asset manager breaks down 5 ways of valuing bitcoin and deciding whether to own it after the digital asset breached $40,000 for the first time

“People are seeing a move to it as a reserve asset, knowing there’s a limited supply of Bitcoin, and saying, ‘okay, I want my piece of it before it goes too high in price,” Nguyen said.

The subsequent rise in bitcoin prices then pulled institutional investors into the fray. Fund managers who previously balked at the token and its violent price swings feared they were missing out on strong returns and began shifting some cash into the cryptocurrency.

Institutional investors have since pushed billions of dollars into the cryptocurrency market. Their involvement has played the biggest part in the token’s meteoric rise through the end of 2020, according to Douglas Borthwick, chief marketing officer at digital-asset trading platform INX.

“If you don’t have something in your portfolio that’s performing well, then you’re not going to perform well. People are going to leave your fund,” Borthwick told Insider. “You’ve got larger and larger position sizes chasing a smaller and smaller number of bitcoin in circulation.”

(2) Demand for inflation hedges

Bitcoin may first seem completely disconnected from the coronavirus pandemic, but the health crisis’ fallout has played a critical role in supporting token prices. Governments around the world passed several trillion dollars worth of fiscal stimulus to pad against the pandemic’s economic damage.

The influx of fresh currency and easy monetary conditions boosted the case for bitcoin as a hedge against inflation, JPMorgan analyst Nikolaos Panigirtzoglou said in November. A limited supply of 21 million tokens and insulation from policy decisions saw the token serve as an alternative to gold and other hedge assets.

“That money printing has meant that everyone in the world has been searching for hard assets to invest in, something that isn’t going up in terms of supply,” Borthwick said.

Read more: A growth-fund manager who’s beaten 96% of his peers over the past 5 years shares 6 stocks he sees ‘dominating their space’ for the next 5 to 10 years – including 2 he thinks could grow 100%

(3) Increase legitimacy

Companies and institutional investors warming up to bitcoin has given legitimacy to an asset recently known more for its murky uses than its investment potential. During the token’s 2017 rally, those less familiar with cryptocurrencies associated them with “nefarious activities,” Borthwick said.

PayPal’s adoption and the influx of institutional funds lend bitcoin new legitimacy and interest among retail investors, Borthwick added. And just yesterday, the US Office of the Comptroller of the Currency said national banks can use blockchain networks and stablecoins for payments, further legitimizing digital currencies.

“The more big names get involved in the space and the more regulators start writing regulations about it, the more it becomes a mainstream asset,” Borthwick said.

Curiosity among everyday investors exploded through the end of last year. Global search interest for bitcoin more than tripled from early October to early January, according to Google Trends data. Celebrities ranging from actress Maisie Williams to rapper Meek Mill have tweeted about entering the cryptocurrency market. In a matter of months, the crowd pushing cash into bitcoin has evolved from fund managers and crypto-fanatics to practically everybody else, Borthwick said.

“There’s an absolute land rush to get invested in the crypto space,” he added. “It’s no longer friends and family and old friends from college.”

Read more: BANK OF AMERICA: Buy these 8 US stocks poised to soar in the first quarter of 2021- and avoid these 2 at all costs

What’s ahead for the red-hot cryptocurrency

Bitcoin’s rapid doubling has naturally prompted some investors to deem the token a bubble. JPMorgan said Monday that the token’s rally moves it “into more challenging territory,” and that a continued climb at its current pace would likely “prove unsustainable.”

The market very well may be “prone to a sort of correction,” but it’s unlikely to resemble that seen three years ago, Nguyen said. Institutional investors are poised to maintain their bitcoin positions for fear of prematurely selling and missing out on additional returns.

Growing interest in blockchain and cryptocurrencies also protects prices from returning to the recent lows, Borthwick said

“What you’re talking about here is the adoption of something by everybody in the world over a very short period of time,” he said. “When you talk about a new technology, I don’t think there ever is such a thing as a top.”

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The S&P 500 will climb another 10% as the Democrat-controlled government passes new stimulus, Credit Suisse says

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A reporter spent 10 bitcoins on a sushi dinner for dozens of strangers in 2013. Those coins are worth $230,000 today.

friends eating sushi
  • A tech reporter once lived on bitcoins for a week straight to test how valuable they were in the real world.
  • She bought a bunch of bitcoins in 2013 for $136 each on Coinbase, hoping to use them for daily expenses.
  • On the last night of her experiment, she spent 10 bitcoins on a sushi dinner for dozens of strangers. Today those would be worth about $230,000.
  • The restaurant’s owner has now retired from the food business, thanks in part to his cryptocurrency earnings of 41 bitcoins, or $902,000 today.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Kashmir Hill, a technology reporter at The New York Times, once lived on bitcoins for one week straight as an experiment.

She detailed her memorable experience in a piece for The New York Times.

In 2013, Hill had a special interest in the then 4-year-old cryptocurrency, since her work primarily focused on technology and data privacy. Tech junkies were just getting excited about bitcoins back then, so she decided to explore its value in the real world by testing what it would be like to live on the currency for a few days.

Hill bought some bitcoins for $136 each on the cryptocurrency exchange Coinbase, hoping to find ways she could use her new “money.”

Though she lived in San Francisco, a hot spot for tech startups and companies, there were limited options for her to spend any cryptocurrency. During that week, she lost 5 pounds simply because she was tight on food and transport options. She was also “constantly caffeine deprived” because no coffee seller seemed to accept bitcoins.

Read more: Fund manager Brian Bar ish has returned more than 550% to investors over 2 decades, and he just had 2 of his best years ever. He told us how he did it – and 3 top picks for the next 5 years.

Hill decided to celebrate the last night of her experiment by hosting a dinner for at least 15 strangers at a sushi restaurant called Sake Zone – one of the few places that accepted the token. She sent an open invite on the social-networking site Meetup and to a bitcoin community on Reddit. To her surprise, more than 60 people turned up at the event.

She described the attendees as “a wild cast of characters.” Economists, entrepreneurs who were creating bitcoin apps and games, and two founders of the arts event Burning Man were part of the crowd.

The dinner bill came out to a whopping $957, which she paid for in 10 bitcoins.

“I felt guilty at the time, making Yung Chen accept $1,000 worth of funny money, because it was unclear to me whether Bitcoin should be worth anything at all,” Hill said, referring to the restaurant owner.

As of 2020, the restaurant owner and his wife had retired from the food business. That may partially be because of their cryptocurrency earnings. They hold about 41 bitcoins in total, or $902,000 today.

Bitcoin has had a wild ride this year, hitting record highs more than twice in the past month. The digital asset was trading at about $23,235 on Thursday.

Read more about Kashmir Hill’s week-long bitcoin experiment here.

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