What it takes to keep up with the digital health boom

Hello,

Welcome to Insider Healthcare. I’m Lydia Ramsey Pflanzer, and this week in healthcare news:

If you’re new to this newsletter, sign up here. Tips, comments? Email me at lramsey@insider.com or tweet @lydiaramsey125. Let’s get to it…


We’ll be off next Monday for the holiday! Hope you all have a great weekend, and we’ll see you again on Tuesday.


A check with the words "paid to the order of digital health" written on it surrounded by dollar signs on a blue background.

Keeping up with the digital health boom

Dealmaking is heating up in healthcare.

Case in point: Ro on Wednesday made its third acquisition in the last year, buying at-home diagnostics startup Kit.

Megan Hernbroth spoke to some of the folks involved in inking digital health deals. They’ve been working overtime amid the boom – pulling all-nighters and working seven days a week.

The boom has led to a new crop of healthcare startups.

With the help of the VC team here at Insider, we pulled together a list of 23 of the most promising healthcare startups of 2021.

Read the full list here>>

Blake Dodge meanwhile has spent the past few weeks searching out the bankers that every digital health company should know.

They shared with her predictions for the future of the industry.

Meet digital health’s go-to bankers>>

12 top bankers break down how tech is driving record deals and the next generation of giants


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The cost of inequity

Over the last few months, the Insider newsroom has been busy reporting on a series that quantifies the cost of inequity in the US.

The healthcare team contributed some articles:

Find the whole project here>>

How inequity persists in America


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What’s fueling women’s-health startups

It’s Patricia Kelly Yeo’s last week with us here on Insider’s healthcare team! In her final few weeks, she went deep on what’s happening in women’s health.

On the heels of Ro’s announced deal to buy Modern Fertility, we started wondering what the future of women’s health looks like: Is it possible to grow a startup focused on something like fertility, or contraception? Or is the fate ultimately to become an acquisition target?

Kelly spoke to experts in the field to understand how women’s-health startups could benefit from all the dealmaking.

Meanwhile, Kindbody last Friday raised $62 million, valuing the fertility clinic startup at $612 million.

That puts Kindbody as one of the top-funded women’s-health startups.

Get the full list here>>

From birth-control delivery to online pregnancy care, here are the 9 highest-funded women’s-health startups


More stories we covered this week:


– Lydia

Read the original article on Business Insider

HSBC has closed its main office in Hong Kong after an outbreak of COVID-19 at a gym

A worker wearing PPE guards the entrance of HSBC bank main Hong Kong office after it was closed until further notice after three people tested positive for Covid-19 amid a recent wave of infections among the citys business and expatriate community in Hong Kong on March 17, 2021.
A worker wearing PPE guards the entrance of HSBC bank main Hong Kong office after it was closed until further notice after three people tested positive for Covid-19 amid a recent wave of infections among the city’s business and expatriate community in Hong Kong on March 17, 2021.

  • HSBC has temporarily shut its main Hong Kong office after three workers tested positive for COVID-19.
  • There has been a wave of infections in the city following an outbreak at a local gym.
  • In an internal memo seen by Bloomberg, HSBC said the bank can reopen when staff have been tested.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

HSBC closed its main office in Hong Kong until further notice on Tuesday after three people working there tested positive for COVID-19.

The region’s Centre for Health Protection (CHP) published a formal notice asking people who spent more than two hours in the building between March 3 and 16 to be tested at a government-approved center by March 19, according to an internal memo HSBC sent to staff on Wednesday seen by Bloomberg.

The new infections followed a COVID-19 outbreak last Thursday at a gym in Sai Ying Pun, which has spread to the region’s financial district.

The CHP said Tuesday it was investigating 18 additional confirmed infections of the virus, taking the total number of cases in Hong Kong to date to 11,340.

The CHP also extended the current social distancing measures until March 31.

“It is our understanding that HMB can return to normal business when virus testing of colleagues and deep cleaning of the facility are complete,” HSBC said in the memo. “The exact timing is yet to be confirmed.”

Around 30,000 HSBC employees now have no access to the lender’s flagship office, located at 1 Queen’s Road Central, in the center of Hong Kong’s business district.

Guards wearing masks, face shields and protective clothing were standing in front of the building’s entrances and a poster stuck on the door told customers to visit another HSBC branch in the local area, Bloomberg reported.

Insider approached HSBC for comment but did not immediately receive a reply.

A spokeswoman from the bank told Bloomberg that HSBC was following advice from health authorities and taking the necessary steps so the building can reopen when it’s safe.

“For banking services, we have well-developed contingency measures that ensure our services and critical processes continue to be maintained,” she said.

Hong Kong, with a population of 7.5 million, has kept coronavirus cases low thanks to strict contact tracing, testing and quarantine measures. There have been 203 deaths in the city, according to the CHP data.

With a total of 292 cases between March 2 to March 15, the latest outbreak is the second largest since a surge in November.

Read the original article on Business Insider