Etsy plans to spend $1.6 billion buying Depop, a social shopping app that’s helping teens get rich. Some Depop sellers pull in $300,000 a year – here’s how to make money on it.

Depop
Depop is a social shopping app targeted at Gen Z shoppers.

Instead of spending weekends or school holidays washing dishes and waiting tables, entrepreneurially minded teens are launching mini businesses to earn money online.

Depop app
The Depop app.

This is largely thanks to new apps that enable young shoppers to buy or sell secondhand clothing and accessories.

Depop, which launched in Milan in 2011 and has quickly gained a cult following around the world, is one of them. 

Depop is easy to use, which is one of the reasons it’s so successful.

Depop
Downloading the Depop app.

Depop has amassed more than 30 million customers in 150 countries since launching in 2011.

First, you need to download the app.

Depop
The landing page on the app.

Depop counts companies such as Poshmark and ThredUp as its competitors, and has been described as a mix between eBay and Instagram.

Depop will then ask you to create a username, link the account to your email address, and add a photo that represents your brand.

Depop
Setting up your shop.

Unlike rivals such as Poshmark or eBay, there’s more of a communal aesthetic on Depop and sellers are primarily listing streetwear, vintage, or late 1990s/early 2000s fashion. 

You’ll need to describe the style of your brand and what you’re planning to sell.

Depop
Explain what you’re selling.

This description will appear just under your username on your personal page. You can also link to your Instagram page to promote yourself more.

Next, you set up your billing address details and link your account to your PayPal. This is where all payments are handled.

Depop
The process is fairly straightforward.

You also have the option to register as a business and add in the relevant tax details. 

It’s as simple as that.

Depop
Now you can list your first item.

You’re ready to go.

Once you have a profile, you can start listing new items for sale.

Depop
Catchy photos pay off.

Depop advises sellers to post at least four photos and a video to give the item its best chance of selling.

You select the category that the item falls under.

Depop
There are 14 categories in total.

These are umbrella categories, such as menswear, womenswear, or sports equipment, for example. You can add a more detailed description of the item in another box, however.

The seller must cover the cost of shipping each item.

Depop
Depop uses Hermes courier in the UK.

In the UK, for example, the seller can either choose to do this process entirely on their own or pay to use a Depop recommended delivery company.

If you’re shipping internationally, you need to set the price yourself. 

Lastly, add the price of the item you’re listing.

Depop
There are no set guidelines for pricing.

There are no set guidelines for pricing, but sellers are advised to benchmark their prices against other products listed on the app.

Depop charges a 10% fee on each item sold.

Depop
Sellers will lose 10% of what they earn on each item.

This 10% is taken off the total transaction amount, which includes the cost of shipping. 

Customers can like, comment on, or save an item to their profile, much like you can on Instagram.

Depop
It has an Instagram-like setup.

They can also leave reviews and rate the seller. This feedback appears on the sellers’ profile page. 

Etsy said Wednesday that it was buying Depop for $1.625 billion as it looked to expand its reach to the Gen Z market.

Depop
Depop is known for being popular with Gen Z shoppers.

90% of Depop’s users are under 26 and it has its sights firmly set on this consumer base.

The company says its mission is to empower young shoppers to disrupt the fashion industry and give them the chance to become entrepreneurs.

Emma Rogue, Depop Seller
Emma Rogue (@emmarogue_ on TikTok) runs the Depop shop Shop Rogue

“This company is for the next generation,” Rachel Swidenbank, vice president of marketplace at Depop, previously told Insider. 

And for some, selling on Depop is a lucrative hobby.

Emma Rogue Depop
Emma Rogue lists a Y2K Fuzzy Animal Print Minibag on her Depop for $22.50

Swidenbank said that some users pull in as much as $300,000 a year selling on the app

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Gwyneth Paltrow is Rent the Runway’s newest board member – but she’s never used the clothes-rental service

Gwyneth Paltrow Getty Images
Gwyneth Paltrow joins Rent the Runway’s board.

  • Gwyneth Paltrow is joining the board of directors at clothes-rental service Rent the Runway.
  • Paltrow told The New York Times that she’s never used Rent the Runway.
  • “I’ve got my welcome code in my inbox, so I’ll soon be trying it out,” she told The Times.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Gwyneth Paltrow, actress and founder of lifestyle brand Goop, is joining the board of directors at Rent the Runway, the clothes-rental service. The news was first reported by The New York Times.

Paltrow told The Times that she’s never actually used Rent the Runway.

Rent the Runway started in 2009 as a way to rent one-off items for special events. It’s grown into a platform for people to rent everyday clothes instead of buying new ones. It has also added kids’ clothing and homeware rentals, via a partnership with West Elm.

“What’s fascinating is that, in my own way, I’ve been renting the runway for years,” she told The Times. “Borrowing a dress from a designer for a single moment at a premiere or an awards show, then giving it back afterward. Now I guess everyone is doing it. But I’ve got my welcome code in my inbox, so I’ll soon be trying it out.”

Read more: EXCLUSIVE: Rent the Runway CEO Jennifer Hyman, one of the most successful female founders, is fighting to save her company

Rent the Runway CEO Jennifer Hyman is hoping to tap into Paltrow’s entrepreneurial expertise. Critics say some of Goop’s products and recommendations, including its $66 vaginal jade eggs or bee venom therapy, are backed by unsubstantiated health claims, but Paltrow has built the brand into a $250 million empire.

“Gwyneth’s keen understanding of consumer psychology and unparalleled ability to tap into and define the cultural zeitgeist will play a key role in propelling Rent the Runway forward in a post-pandemic world,” Hyman said in a LinkedIn post this week, adding that the two have known each other for longer than a decade.

Rent the Runway started in 2009 as a way to rent one-off items for special events, and it’s grown to become a platform for renting everyday items as an alternative to buying new clothes. It has also added kids’ clothing and homeware rentals, via a partnership with West Elm.

Pre-pandemic, CEO Jennifer Hyman was prepping it to become the “Amazon Prime of rental” by diversifying into new areas. But when the pandemic hit, people went off the idea of renting clothes. It wiped $250 million from the company’s valuation, and Hyman was forced to close its stores and lay off or furlough half of its staff.

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Victoria’s Secret is experiencing a major comeback after years of declining sales – and Wall Street is salivating

Victoria Secret
Victoria’s Secret was known for its annual runway show.

  • Wall Street is optimistic about Victoria’s Secret’s revival after its parent firm reported Q1 earnings.
  • Same-store sales were up 9% for the first three months of 2021 versus 2019 for Victoria’s Secret brand.
  • Experts cite more inclusive marketing and a management shakeup as key factors.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Victoria’s Secret is having somewhat of a comeback, and Wall Street is starting to get excited about it.

In L Brands’ earnings call this week, several analysts congratulated the management team on Victoria’s Secret’s first-quarter results. Same-store sales were up 9% in the first quarter of the year versus 2019 and operating income, a measure of profitability, increased by $213 million or 665%.

“Welcome back,” Marni Shapiro, an analyst at The Retail Tracker, triumphantly said on the call. “I am so excited about this…it’s brilliant and overdue.”

The sentiments of this week’s call stood in stark contrast to its earnings a year ago when the management team was navigating store closings and worker-safety issues brought about by the pandemic.

It was also adjusting to the news that a private equity firm that had agreed to buy a majority stake in the company was pulling out of the deal. This left investors wondering whether Victoria’s Secret would be able to continue its turnaround effort – addressing sliding sales, former sexual harassment allegations, and moving beyond its connection to the Jeffrey Epstein scandal.

How then, did management swing the pendulum around and come to win back Wall Street?

Overtly sexualized ads, the Epstein connection, and harassment allegations

To understand Victoria’s Secret’s “comeback”, it’s necessary to understand its downfall.

Between 2016 and 2020, the brand became the subject of intense scrutiny among investors and the media. After it achieved explosive success between the mid-1990s to mid-2000s with its racy runway shows (which helped to launch the careers of Gisele Bündchen, Tyra Banks, and Heidi Klum), it was increasingly accused of being out of date and oversexualized in its brand image, especially in the wake of the #MeToo movement.

Read more: The rise, fall, and comeback of Victoria’s Secret, America’s biggest lingerie retailer

Gisele Bündchen victorias secret fashion show 2018
Bündchen walks the runway at the 2006 Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show.

Sales started to dwindle, customers complained that the quality of its lingerie and apparel had slipped, and analysts became more critical as the level of promotions in its stores crept up, highlighting them as evidence that the company was struggling.

In 2019 and 2020, Victoria’s Secret’s troubles were exacerbated after the company found itself tied up in the Jeffrey Epstein scandal. Epstein managed Wexner’s money for several years and was considered a “close friend” of the family. Reports later emerged that Epstein had allegedly used his connection to Victoria’s Secret to coerce victims into sexual acts.

In early 2020, the company then faced a fresh wave of scandals after a New York Times investigation found a culture “of misogyny, bullying, and harassment” at the brand, which longtime marketing chief Ed Razek and Wexner were accused of creating.

Former executives, who held longtime positions at Victoria’s Secret’s corporate offices, told Insider in 2019 that Razek and Wexner had full control over the brand image and made it impossible for any CEO of Victoria’s Secret to update this or make a mark.

Read more: Former employees reveal what the billionaire head of Victoria’s Secret is like as a boss as he faces backlash over his ties to Jeffrey Epstein

‘We’re moving from what men want to what women want’

In the time since these explosive reports, both Razek and Wexner have stepped down from the company. Wexner and his wife, Abigail, are no longer on the board of directors but remain L Brands’ biggest shareholders.

And Victoria’s Secret’s executive team and L Brands board have undergone a major shakeup in the past year, gaining a new CEO, Martin Waters, who previously headed up L Brands’ international division.

The lack of diversity on its board, which was criticized by an activist shareholder, has also been addressed. In 2019, out of the 11 board members, nine were men. Today, there are six women on the board, including the chair, Sarah Nash.

leslie wexner ed razek
Les Wexner (L) and Ed Razek (R).

Critics say this shake-up has been crucial for Victoria’s Secret’s comeback by allowing new perspectives and fresh ideas to come through.

“We’re moving from what men want to what women want,” Waters said on the call on Thursday. “From sexy for a few to sexy for all.

“It’s about including most women rather than excluding most women and being grounded in real life rather than mostly unattainable,” he said.

Morgan Stanley analyst Kimberly Greenberger said she “applauded” its “long overdue positioning shift,” in a note to clients Friday.

The brand imagery of 2021 looks very different from what Victoria’s Secret had previously been known for; oversexualized ads have been replaced with more body-positive campaigns.

A post shared by Victoria’s Secret (@victoriassecret)

Waters said that customers are responding well to these changes.

They “are noticing and uploading our efforts to reposition the brand,’ he said Thursday. “We heard clearly what they [customers and associates] want from us as a brand, which is all about representing and celebrating all women and being there for every moment of their life, including supporting and advocating the things that matter most to them, and that’s exactly what we’re doing.”

According to, Gabriella Santaniello, analyst and founder of retail research firm A-Line Partners, the company is following through on its marketing by enacting real change in its stores. “They recently brought in plus-sized mannequins which reflect their use of plus-sized models in their advertising,” she said in an email to Insider on Friday.

“I think they need to focus on a 360 view of the brand. During the pandemic, they were able to evolve and tie up some loose ends. They need to make sure they do not waiver because it will come across as inauthentic and that’s why they haven’t really been successful with the turnaround over these past few years,” she added.

Neil Saunders, managing director of GlobalData Retail, said that more “appropriate” marketing is pulling shoppers back to the brand. As is, a better product assortment.

Victoria’s Secret “has been sensible over the past year and there is a lot of focus on making women feel good whether it be through indulgences or cozy items to wear around the house,” he wrote an email to Insider.

But there’s still work to be done. Waters said the focus now is bringing more innovation to its products, especially around its bread and butter item – bras.

victorias secret Maria Borges
Victoria’s Secret was previously slow to adjust to a shift from padded and push-up bras toward bralettes and sports bras, missing out on a major fashion trend.

Santaniello said that the pandemic gave Victoria’s Secret time for a moment of pause to address its business.

“This past year was just a culmination of strategies they put into place but never fully implemented,” she said. “They were smart in using this past year, which was essentially a reset across all retail, to finally tie up their loose ends.”

During this time, Victoria’s Secret closed 250 underperforming stores and was able to pull back on inventory and cut the level of promotions. This boosted its margins in the most recent quarter.

Still, Saunders says its comeback shouldn’t be overinflated. Some of its performance has been boosted by stimulus spending and a booming consumer economy, he said.

“That rising tide of spending is floating all boats. The real acid test is what performance looks like in the quarters and years ahead,” he added.

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Lululemon is diving into the $30 billion resale market by offering money for used yoga pants

Lululemon
Resale is becoming an increasingly important market.

  • Lululemon is piloting a new service to enable customers to swap used clothes for gift cards.
  • These clothes will be washed and resold at a discount.
  • Analysts are advising retailers to get into resale to make money and attract sustainability-conscious customers.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Lululemon is dipping its toes into the booming resale market.

The athleisure clothing giant, which is known for its $100 workout leggings, announced Tuesday that it is launching a new resale initiative known as Like New.

Starting in May, customers will be able to return “gently used” Lululemon clothing to certain stores in California and Texas in exchange for a gift card to spend online at the brand.

These items will be washed and then available for other customers to buy back at a discount. A company spokesperson told Insider that the level of discount will depend on whether the item is in “like new” condition or “gently used.” Any items that don’t make the cut will be recycled. Lululemon said it is partnering with resale operations expert Trove to roll out this new service.

Lululemon is among the first major retailers in the US to make moves into the $30 billion resale market. Analysts say that there an immediate opportunity for companies to cash in on this growing market, while also showing customers and investors that they are more sustainability-minded.

Jefferies analysts recently estimated that the secondhand market will represent more than 10% of the apparel market over the next 10 years.

“Legacy retailers should start to take note, and find a way to participate,” these analysts wrote.

Offering resale options is especially important if Lululemon wants to attract younger customers, who are spending more on resale than any generation before, according to Jefferies.

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The maker of Lil Nas X’s ‘Satan Shoes’ has settled a trademark dispute brought by Nike, and will buy back doctored Nike shoes it has sold

Lil Nas X's "Satan Shoe" collaboration with MSCHF.
Lil Nas X’s “Satan Shoe” collaboration with MSCHF.

  • Nike settled its lawsuit with MSCHF over the controversial “Satan Shoe,” the retailer told Insider.
  • The terms of the settlement include a voluntary recall for MSCHF buy back the shoes.
  • “The parties are pleased to put this dispute behind them,” Nike said in a statement.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Nike has settled with the maker of Lil Nas X’s controversial “Satan Shoe” for an undisclosed amount.

Nike filed a trademark infringement suit on March 29 after art startup MSCHF collaborated with Lil Nas X on a shoe that knocks off the Nike Air Max 97 and claimed to insert a drop of human blood to the midsole.

The terms of the settlement include a voluntary recall that allow MSCHF to buy back the Satan Shoes for their original retail price. MSCHF said on April 1 it had shipped at least 200 pairs of the shoe before a judge granted Nike’s temporary restraining order to stop processing the orders.

“If any purchasers were confused, or if they otherwise want to return their shoes, they may do so for a full refund,” Nike said in a statement to Insider. “The parties are pleased to put this dispute behind them.”

Read more: Nike tried to sue the controversial ‘Satan Shoes’ out of existence. Instead, it’s fueling hype as pairs sell for thousands of dollars on the resale market.

Nike added customers who do not want to return the shoe or encounter a “product issue, defect, or health concern,” should contact MSCHF. The shoe giant reiterated Nike had no role in selling the Satan Shoe.

MSCHF has made a reputation selling unorthodox, “meme-worthy” products, including a $10 toaster bath bomb and an app for making stock investments based on astrological signs.

Last year, the startup sold a Jesus-inspired sneaker filled with holy water that also appeared to be altered Nike Air Max 97s. The “Jesus Shoe” will also be part of the voluntary recall as part of Nike’s settlement.

“If we can make people a fan of the brand and not the product, we can do whatever the f–k we want,” Daniel Greenberg, the head of commerce at MSCHF, told Insider’s Paige Leskin last year. “We build what we want. We don’t care.”

MSCHF was not immediately available for comment.

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Take a look at Adidas’ new running shoes that can be customized with Legos

adidas_Ultraboost_DNA_x_LEGO(r)_Plates_Shoes_White_FY7690_011_hover_standard
  • Adidas’ new running shoes can be fitted with Lego bricks on either side of the shoe.
  • The Ultraboost DNA x Lego shoes come with different plates that can be swapped out.
  • The $200 shoes became available for purchase on Thursday morning.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Adidas revealed its newest shoes that can be customized with Lego blocks on Wednesday.

The Ultraboost DNA shoes, which went on sale Thursday, look like regular Adidas running shoes, but with a Lego twist: they feature plastic strips on the side that can be used to hold Lego plates.

The $200 shoes have three strips on each side and each strip can fit three two-by-two Lego plates.

The running shoes come with a selection of Legos for the shoe, but can also be swapped out for other bricks. They also have a tongue with a Lego design on it, as well as grooves on the toe of the shoe and on the inside of the shoe that emulate the ridges on Lego pieces.

Adidas has been working with Lego on products for quite some time. In October, the two companies announced a multi-year brand partnership.

The new shoe design is Adidas’ latest effort to compete with other brands like Nike. In February, Nike released its first hands-free sneaker for $120.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A judge granted Nike’s temporary restraining order against the startup that made Lil Nas X’s ‘Satan shoe’

Lil Nas X's "Satan Shoe" collaboration with MSCHF.
Lil Nas X’s “Satan Shoe” collaboration with MSCHF.

  • A judge granted Nike’s request for a temporary restraining order against MSCHF, the brand that made Lil Nas X’s “Satan shoe.
  • During the hearing, MSCHF argued the shoe was not meant to be worn.
  • Nike cited an example in Miley Cyrus, who posted photos wearing the shoes with the caption “Can you see Satan?”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A court granted Nike’s request for a temporary restraining order against MSCHF, the retail startup that made Lil Nas X’s “Satan Shoe.”

Singer Lil Nas X and MSCHF collaborated on the shoe to promote his new music video “MONTERO (Call Me By Your Name),” which uses imagery resembling heaven and hell. The shoe resembled Nike’s Air Max 97, and MSCHF said it included one drop of human blood in the midsole.

Nike, which had no involvement in the Satan Shoe, filed the request for the temporary restraining order Wednesday morning, demanding MSCHF not ship orders on the shoe.

But MSCHF had shipped at least 200 pairs of Satan shoes before Nike filed the request, Megan Bannigan, the startup’s attorney, said during a court hearing Thursday morning.

Bannigan said no other pairs of the shoes exist and it will not ship any more. During the hearing, MSCHF argued the shoe was a work of art protected by the First Amendment.

“These are not shoes that are worn, there are very few of them. That’s the kind of artwork that we’re talking about,” Bannigan said.

But Nike cited an example in pop star Miley Cyrus, who earlier this week posted photos on Instagram wearing the shoes with the caption “Can you see Satan?”

MSCHF’s Satan shoes poses “substantial threat of irreparable harm” to Nike, the company argues, because consumers will associate the shoe retailer with satanic themed shoes. Nike asked the court to prohibit MSCHF from using the Satan shoes in advertising, and assisting other people in promoting the shoe.

Nike filed a trademark infringement suit against MSCHF on Tuesday over the use of its “Swoosh,” and claimed the retail startup confused customers into believing Nike “endorsed satanism.” Some social media users, including basketball player Nick Young, said they would boycott Nike for the MSCHF shoe.

Read more: Being sued by Nike for its Lil Nas X’s Satan blood sneaker is the ultimate endgame for viral streetwear and art company MSCHF

In the suit, Nike is demanding MSCHF to deliver all products that bear resemblance to Nike products for destruction, and that MSCHF pay for the cost of the suit and lawyer fees on top of damages.

MSCHF sold out all available pairs of the shoe in under one minute on Monday. The shoes cost $1,018, as a nod to the Bible verse Luke 10:18: “So He told them, ‘I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven.'”

Lil Nas X announced a giveaway of what was supposed to be the 666th pair on Twitter: “if u want the 666th pair of the satan shoes quote this tweet and use #satanshoes to be entered and I’ll pick someone by thursday,” he said.

Nike, MSCHF, and representatives for Lil Nas X were not immediately available for comment.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A judge ordered Lil Nas X’s ‘Satan shoe’ maker to halt all orders, but they’ve reportedly already started shipping and the rapper is hosting a giveaway for the 666th pair

Lil Nas X's "Satan Shoe" collaboration with MSCHF.
Lil Nas X’s “Satan Shoe” collaboration with MSCHF.

  • A judge ruled MSCHF, the brand that made Lil Nas X’s “Satan shoe,” must stop fulfilling orders.
  • Nike filed a temporary restraining order Wednesday morning requesting MSCHF not ship orders.
  • Lil Nas X and MSCHF collaborated on the shoe, which resembles the Nike Air Max 97.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A court ordered MSCHF, the retail startup that made Lil Nas X’s “Satan Shoe,” to stop fulfilling orders immediately on Wednesday evening.

Singer Lil Nas X and MSCHF collaborated on the shoe to promote his new music video “MONTERO (Call Me By Your Name),” which uses imagery resembling heaven and hell. The shoe resembled Nike’s Air Max 97, and MSCHF said it included one drop of human blood in the midsole.

Nike, which had no involvement in the Satan Shoe, filed a temporary restraining order Wednesday morning requesting MSCHF not ship orders on the shoe.

MSCHF’s Satan shoes poses “substantial threat of irreparable harm” to Nike, the company argues, because consumers will associate the shoe retailer with satanic themed shoes. Nike asked the court to prohibit MSCHF from using the Satan shoes in advertising, and assisting other people in promoting the shoe.

“Issuance of the requested temporary restraining order is in the public interest to protect the public against confusion, deception, and mistake,” the court order reads.

Nike filed a trademark infringement suit against MSCHF on Tuesday over the use of its “swoosh,” and claimed the retail startup confused customers into believing Nike “endorsed satanism.” Some social media users, including basketball player Nick Young, said they would boycott Nike for the MSCHF shoe.

Read more: Being sued by Nike for its Lil Nas X’s Satan blood sneaker is the ultimate endgame for viral streetwear and art company MSCHF

In the suit, Nike demanded MSCHF to deliver all products that bear resemblance to Nike products for destruction, and that MSCHF pay for the cost of the suit and lawyer fees on top of damages.

MSCHF sold out 665 pairs of the shoe in under one minute on Monday. The shoes cost $1,018, as a nod to the Bible verse Luke 10:18: “So He told them, ‘I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven.'”

Lil Nas X announced a giveaway of the 666th pair on Twitter: “if u want the 666th pair of the satan shoes quote this tweet and use #satanshoes to be entered and I’ll pick someone by thursday,” he said.

Nike, MSCHF, and representatives for Lil Nas X were not immediately available for comment.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Nike is suing the maker of Lil Nas X’s blood shoe, alleging it has ‘suffered significant harm’ – including complaints from customers who ‘believe that Nike is endorsing satanism’

Lil Nas X Satan shoes
Nike is suing Mschf on allegations of trademark infringement over the retail startup’s “Satan Shoes.”

  • Nike is suing Mschf, accusing it of trademark infringement over the retail startup’s “Satan Shoes.”
  • Mschf collaborated with Lil Nas X for the shoe, which sold out in under one minute on Monday.
  • The shoe looks like a modified Nike Air Max 97 and includes the brand’s trademarked Swoosh.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Nike filed a lawsuit against Mschf over its “Satan Shoes,” made in collaboration with the rapper Lil Nas X.

Nike accused Mschf of trademark infringement after it appeared to use the Air Max 97 shoe for inspiration for its Satan Shoes, which add red ink and a drop of human blood to the midsole. Mschf collaborated with Lil Nas X for the sneaker around the release of his song “Montero (Call Me By Your Name).”

The retail giant said Mschf’s “unauthorized” Nike-inspired shoe confused consumers into thinking Nike had created the product. Nike also alleged Mschf’s use of the company’s trademarked “Swoosh” confused and misled consumers.

Nike said customers had called for a boycott of the company over Mschf’s shoe. The basketball player Nick Young tweeted he debated wearing Nike after the announcement of the Satan Shoes.

“Nike files this lawsuit to maintain control of its brand, to protect its intellectual property, and to clear the confusion and dilution in the marketplace by setting the record straight – Nike has not and does not approve or authorize MSCHF’s customized Satan Shoes,” the suit said.

Mschf was not immediately available for comment.

Nike is requesting that Mschf pay for the cost of the suit and lawyer fees on top of damages, as it alleged it suffered harm to its reputation that “money cannot compensate.”

Read more: 2 former Nike execs have been tapped to turn underwear brand Tommy John into a billion-dollar company – and they’re going all-in on product innovation and wholesale partnerships to get there

The company also alleged it had suffered “significant harm to its goodwill, including among consumers who believe that Nike is endorsing satanism.” Nike asked the court to order Mschf to deliver all products that bear resemblance to Nike products for destruction.

The Satan Shoes sold out in under one minute, Mschf told Insider Monday morning. Mschf released 666 pairs for $1,018 each as a nod to the Bible verse Luke 10:18, which says: “So He told them, ‘I saw Satan fall like lightning from heaven.'”

Nike previously told The New York Times the retailer had no involvement with the Mschf shoe. “We do not have a relationship with Little Nas X or MSCHF. Nike did not design or release these shoes, and we do not endorse them,” the company said in a statement to The Times.

Mschf previously turned pairs of Nike Air Max 97s into Jesus-inspired sneakers filled with holy water that came from the Jordan River and was blessed by a priest, The Independent reported. The retailer sold one pair of the “Jesus Shoes” for $3,000.

Lil Nas X responded to the news of the suit with a meme, much like how he’d been responding to criticism of the song’s music video.

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Amazon has reportedly surpassed Walmart as the top apparel retailer in the US

walmart new test stores
The apparel signs at Walmart.

Amazon has surpassed Walmart as the country’s top apparel retailer, CNBC reported.

Last year’s e-commerce boom increased Amazon’s apparel and foot ware sales to $41 billion in 2020, representing 11-12% of all clothes sold in the US, according to a Wells Fargo analyst note cited by CNBC.

Wells Fargo analysts said Amazon had 20% to 25% more apparel sales in 2020 than Walmart, and the online retailer will surpass $45 billion in apparel and footwear this year.

Analysts had predicted Amazon would soon lead Walmart in apparel, the space where Americans spend the most money online relative to things like electronics and furniture.

Walmart said it does not comment on analyst notes. Amazon declined to comment.

Read more: A Walmart exec reveals why its new partnership with the fashion designer who dresses Lady Gaga, Oprah, and Michelle Obama will elevate premium private-label offerings and boost apparel sales

As decreased foot traffic in malls hurt sales at department stores like Macy’s and JCPenny, Amazon grew its clothing and accessory business. Of the 26% of consumers who said they spend less on apparel at Macy’s than they did three years ago, over 42% said they’ve switched that spending to Amazon, according to a 2018 report by Insider Intelligence.

Walmart introduced new clothing brands and partnered with fashion designers in recent years to boost sales. Walmart.com recently added a whole selection of sports apparel, and partnered with with a fashion designer who dressed Michelle Obama.

Amazon’s rise comes as some fashion brands stopped selling on its platform. Nike stopped selling shoes and other products on Amazon’s site in 2019. The two previously had a deal where Nike would sell on Amazon if the e-commerce giant stopped third-party sellers from listing fake items. Birkenstock removed items after the shoe brand’s CEO accused Amazon of failing to crack down on counterfeits.

Amazon posted its highest e-commerce growth in three years during the COVID-19 pandemic, when many Americans avoided shopping indoors. The company’s Web Services generated huge growth last year as well due to companies transitioning to work-from-home models.

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