Amazon brought in $2 billion less than analysts expected, even with a second-quarter Prime Day

Andy Jassy
Amazon CEO Andy Jassy.

  • Amazon reported its second-quarter earnings results on Thursday.
  • The ecommerce giant surpassed analysts’ projections for earnings but missed on revenue.
  • Amazon also issued third-quarter guidance, anticipating net sales of up to $112 billion.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Amazon on Thursday posted mixed second-quarter earnings, missing on Wall Street’s revenue expectations despite the annual Prime Day shopping holiday falling in June this year.

Here are the key numbers:

  • Revenue: $113.08 billion, versus an expected $115.20 billion
  • Earnings per share (EPS): $15.12 compared to an expected $12.30 per share

After postponing Prime Day in 2020 due to the pandemic, the annual shopping holiday returned to mid-year, taking place over two days beginning June 21. Amazon said customers purchased more than 250 million items over the two-day span, with the latest Fire TV Stick the most popular item sold, the company said.

Amazon called this year’s Prime Day “the biggest two-day period ever for small and medium-sized businesses” on its stores worldwide.

AWS, Amazon’s cloud unit, saw $14.8 billion in revenue in the second quarter, up from $10.8 billion during the same period of 2020.

“We’ve seen AWS growth reaccelerate as more companies bring forward plans to transform their businesses and move to the cloud,” CEO Andy Jassy said in a statement, his first quarterly earnings after taking the helm from founder Jeff Bezos on July 5.

Overall, sales were up 27% from $88.9 billion during the second quarter 2020. Profits rose to $7.8 billion, compared to $5.2 billion posted in the second quarter of last year.

Amazon also issued third-quarter guidance, saying it’s anticipating between $106 billion and $112 billion in sales, an increase of between 10% and 16% compared with the third-quarter 2020.

Read the original article on Business Insider

I canceled my subscription to Amazon Prime right as the pandemic lockdowns began and 12 months later I don’t miss it at all

Jeff Bezos
Amazon cofounder and former CEO Jeff Bezos.

  • It turns out that Amazon Prime isn’t necessary, even if you’re ordering from Amazon frequently.
  • I canceled my subscription in May 2020, and it has had zero impact on order speed or pricing.
  • On the plus side, I’m saving at least $120 annually on the expensive membership fee.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

In April 2020, just as the pandemic lockdowns were taking effect in New York City, I canceled the Amazon Prime subscription my wife and I shared.

In the year-plus since that subscription ended, I’ve not missed it a single time – and we’re saving $130 annually, plus tax, by not paying for the service.

We aren’t anti-Amazon crusaders by any means: This year so far, I’ve placed 15 separate orders for products delivered through Amazon. Last year, the total was 20 orders.

How much were my shipping costs for all of those orders? A grand total of $17.57 for 2020, and a whopping $12.26 in 2021 so far.

That includes two air conditioners (with free shipping), two large Tommy Bahama beach chairs (again, free shipping), and a variety of gifts sent to a relatively remote town in Pennsylvania.

Email from Amazon after canceling Amazon Prime subscription.
In the email confirming my Amazon Prime cancelation there is a massive button to re-join Amazon Prime, naturally.

While it’s true that some of those items we purchased would’ve come with a slight discount through Prime, or that some would’ve been delivered the very next day (rather than two or three days later), it’s extremely unlikely that those discounts would add up to the over $100 difference between what we’re paying in shipping now versus what we were paying for a Prime membership.

Moreover, even without a Prime membership, most items we buy through Amazon are delivered shockingly fast.

Living in Brooklyn, not too far from a major Amazon distribution center on Staten Island, assuredly doesn’t hurt! But I’ve had similarly positive experiences sending gifts through Amazon to family in Pennsylvania and Ohio, where packages arrived days ahead of projected arrival times.

But what about Prime Video? Frankly, we weren’t using it, and we’re already paying for Netflix, Hulu, and HBO Max. I can name specific reasons for those subscriptions – shows, movies, or entire libraries that justify the ongoing subscription fee. With rare exception, that didn’t happen with Prime Video for us.

More often than not, the video we did want to watch on Prime Video still required a rental fee. That happened enough times that we stopped turning on the service altogether.

My context isn’t everyone else’s context, of course. My wife and I don’t have kids, we live in a major city, and we own a car. Frankly, there weren’t a lot of good reasons for us specifically to pay for Amazon Prime.

Do we really need the Frankie’s Spuntino cookbook delivered the next day, or is it okay if we wait a few days? I kinda think we’ll survive.

But maybe you’re a new parent and you need diapers tomorrow, no matter what? Or you’ve got a job that keeps you from getting errands done during normal business hours? Or any other number of perfectly reasonable situations? I get it!

There is more to the calculation here than strictly financials, and the decision depends on a lot. For $120 annually, though? It’s a decision worth considering.

Got a tip? Contact Insider senior correspondent Ben Gilbert via email (bgilbert@insider.com), or Twitter DM (@realbengilbert). We can keep sources anonymous. Use a non-work device to reach out. PR pitches by email only, please.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Amazon’s big leadership shift and other major exec moves

Hello, and welcome to the latest edition of the Insider Tech weekly newsletter, where we break down the biggest news in tech, including:

Alexei is out on vacation this week, so it’s Jillian D’Onfro, enterprise tech editor, here to fill you in.

Did someone forward this newsletter to you? Sign up here.


This week: Jeff Bezos officially gave up the Amazon throne

AWS Andy Jassy Adam Selipsky
Andy Jassy and Adam Selipsky are in charge now

As Bezos prepares to blast into space, Andy Jassy has officially assumed the CEO title while former Tableau exec Adam Selipsky is taking his place at the helm of $54 billion cloud business Amazon Web Services.


People moves: Facebooker defecting and a Googler off to New Zealand

Fidji Simo attends the 77th Annual Golden Globe Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on January 05, 2020 in Beverly Hills, California.
Fidji Simo, who was one of Facebook’s top women execs, is taking the helm at Instacart

The leader of Facebook’s flagship “big blue” app is leaving after a decade to take over $39 billion food delivery firm Instacart.

Fidji Simo will be taking over at a pivotal time, as the startup tries to quietly build an advertising powerhousee and prepares to go public.

In a more contentious overseas move, senior Google executive Urs Hozle announced plans to jet off to New Zealand for a year, sparking outrage from workers pointing out that he’d opposed the perma-remote lifestyle for lower-level employees.

While it’s one of the first high-profile instances of post-pandemic double standards around remote work, it’s just the latest sign of internal turmoil at Google. Also this week:


Quote of the week:

Heidi Zak, ThirdLove cofounder and co-CEO; Leah Solivan, general partner at Fuel Capital; Spencer Rascoff, general partner at 75 & Sunny Ventures; and Allison Long Pettine, managing partner at Ridge Group Investments, appear on a pink background with the YPO logo repeating.
Notable YPO members include Heidi Zak, ThirdLove cofounder and co-CEO; Leah Solivan, general partner at Fuel Capital; Spencer Rascoff, general partner at 75 & Sunny Ventures; and Allison Long Pettine, managing partner at Ridge Group Investments and founding partner at Ad Astra.

“Talk about Nothing that is said in forum to Nobody under any circumstances. Never means forever.”

The internal code of conduct for a secretive and ultra-exclusive club for young CEOs. Strict rules help executives feel safe talking freely about the challenges of running their companies, prompting them to pony up thousands of dollars for membership.


Recommended readings:

12 companies Zoom could buy as it expands beyond video conferencing, according to analysts

Delivery’s richest CEO has been quietly funding 2 ghost kitchens

Former Uber execs are going after Uber and Lyft’s cheapest rides with MIT tech and public-transit partnerships

Silicon Valley continues its 2021 funding hot streak with a second straight quarter over $20 billion


Thanks for reading, and if you like this newsletter, tell your friends and colleagues they can sign up here to receive it.

– Jillian

Read the original article on Business Insider

Jeff Bezos refused to take elevators in Amazon’s old office and ran up 14 flights of stairs every day without breaking a sweat, his former assistant said

Amazon's former CEO Jeff Bezos smiles and gestures with his hands while talking in front of a pale blue background.
Jeff Bezos stepped down as Amazon CEO on 5 July.

  • Jeff Bezos refused to take elevators and ran up 14 flights of stairs every day, a former assistant told CNBC.
  • Jeff Bezos was like a “puppy” who “never tired,” Ann Hiatt, who worked for Bezos in the early 2000s, said.
  • Bezos stepped down as Amazon’s CEO after 27 years on Monday, handing over to Andy Jassy.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Jeff Bezos would refuse to take elevators in Amazon’s old office building, choosing instead to run up 14 flights of stairs every day to the company’s floor, his former assistant told CNBC.

Ann Hiatt, who worked as Bezos’ executive assistant from 2002 to 2005, claimed Bezos never even broke a sweat running up and down the stairs.

“He’s like a puppy. He would do laps and he was never tired,” Hiatt told CNBC. “That’s Jeff. He couldn’t be held back.”

Hiatt worked with Bezos in the 16-story Pacific Medical Center tower in Seattle, a 1930s-era former military hospital that Amazon occupied from 1999 to 2011 – Bezos was in his mid-30s at the start of that time, and his mid-40s at the end. In 2011, Amazon moved to a sprawling campus in South Lake Union, Seattle.

Bezos stepped down as Amazon CEO after 27 years on Monday, after first announcing his departure in a letter to employees in February. He has handed over to Andy Jassy, formerly chief executive of Amazon Web Services.

Hiatt previously told the New York Times that Jassy was Bezos’ “brain double” in the early 2000s, and would shadow him in meetings and help challenge his thinking.

Since Bezos founded the company 1994, Amazon has grown into a$1.8 trillion dollar business, employed 1.3 million people, and made Bezos the richest man in the world, with a $203 billion net worth, according to Bloomberg’s Billionaires Index.

Jassy will now have to deal with criticism from lawmakers and employees over tough working conditions. Some Amazon delivery drivers previously told Insider that they had to urinate in bottles because their grueling schedules did not allow them enough time to go to the bathroom.

Bezos said that the company needed “to do a better job” for its workers in his 2020 letter to shareholders, after the National Labor Relations Board announced in April that a push by some Alabama employees to form a union had failed.

Read the original article on Business Insider

As Amazon CEO, Jeff Bezos was obsessed with the company’s ‘inevitable’ death

Jeff Bezos
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos.

  • Since 2013, Jeff Bezos has talked publicly about the “inevitable” death of Amazon.
  • Bezos said the life-span of big companies was usually only a few decades. If companies stagnate, they die, he said.
  • “Amazon is not too big to fail … In fact, I predict one day Amazon will fail,” Bezos said in 2018.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Jeff Bezos founded Amazon on July 5, 1994. Exactly 27 years later, on Monday, he stepped down as CEO to make way for senior Amazon executive Andy Jassy.

Under Bezos’ stewardship, Amazon grown into a tech behemoth – but at times the billionaire has seemed convinced that Amazon is doomed to die. Bezos talked about the firm’s potential demise three times between 2013 and 2018, and in his final letter to shareholders in April 2021 he quoted a passage from scientist Richard Dawkins about “staving off death.”

This is extremely unusual for a CEO – with demanding investors looking over their shoulders, executives are normally unflinchingly positive about their firm’s prospects.

But it seems a fear of failure and stagnation propels Bezos on. Here are some of the times he has talked about Amazon’s “inevitable” death:

In 2013, Bezos said big companies only live for a “few decades.”

Bezos spoke to CBS show “60 Minutes” in 2013 to show off Amazon’s automated drone delivery division — a division that in November 2020 laid off dozens of R&D and manufacturing staff, according to a Financial Times report.

“Companies have short lifespans … and Amazon will be disrupted one day,” he said.

Asked whether that fact worried him, Bezos replied: “I don’t worry about it because I know it’s inevitable. Companies come and go, and the companies that are the shiniest and most important of any era — you wait a few decades and they’re gone.”

Bezos added that he would love for Amazon to out-live him.

In 2017, Bezos pondered an “excruciating, painful decline” in a letter to shareholders.

In a 2017 letter to shareholders, Bezos discussed his “Day One” philosophy — he always insisted it was “Day One” for Amazon.

In the letter, he answered a question from an all-hands meeting about what “Day Two” looks like.

Read more: Andy Jassy officially starts as Amazon CEO today. Insiders describe his ‘CHOP’ meetings, micromanagement, and ‘Nice’ emails

“An established company might harvest Day 2 for decades, but the final result would still come,” he added. He then talked about how a company can “fend off” Day Two.

2018: “I predict one day Amazon will fail,” Bezos told staff.

In a recording of a 2018 all-hands meeting obtained by CNBC, Bezos was still just as convinced of Amazon’s inescapable mortality.

“Amazon is not too big to fail … In fact, I predict one day Amazon will fail,” Bezos said in reply to a staffer who asked about big businesses like Sears going bankrupt.

“Amazon will go bankrupt. If you look at large companies, their lifespans tend to be 30-plus years, not a hundred-plus years,” he said.

Bezos said it was his job to delay that date by as long as possible. Amazon turned 27 years old Monday, so it is fast approaching Bezos’s 30-year benchmark.

2021: “Staving off death is a thing that you have to work at,” Bezos quoted from Richard Dawkins in his final letter to shareholders.

In his last letter to shareholders as Amazon CEO in April 2021, Jeff Bezos concluded by quoting a passage from evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins’ book “The Blind Watchmaker.” 

Here is the full passage Bezos quoted:

“Staving off death is a thing that you have to work at. Left to itself – and that is what it is when it dies – the body tends to revert to a state of equilibrium with its environment. If you measure some quantity such as the temperature, the acidity, the water content or the electrical potential in a living body, you will typically find that it is markedly different from the corresponding measure in the surroundings.

“Our bodies, for instance, are usually hotter than our surroundings, and in cold climates they have to work hard to maintain the differential. When we die the work stops, the temperature differential starts to disappear, and we end up the same temperature as our surroundings. Not all animals work so hard to avoid coming into equilibrium with their surrounding temperature, but all animals do some comparable work.

“For instance, in a dry country, animals and plants work to maintain the fluid content of their cells, work against a natural tendency for water to flow from them into the dry outside world. If they fail they die. More generally, if living things didn’t work actively to prevent it, they would eventually merge into their surroundings, and cease to exist as autonomous beings. That is what happens when they die.”

Bezos said this passage was a “fantastic” metaphor for Amazon, saying it shows how companies need to constantly work at being distinctive, rather than settling for a comfortable stasis.

“The world will always try to make Amazon more typical — to bring us into equilibrium with our environment. It will take continuous effort, but we can and must be better than that,” Bezos wrote.

Do you work at Amazon? Got a tip? Contact this reporter via email at ihamilton@insider.com or iahamilton@protonmail.com.

Read the original article on Business Insider

As Jeff Bezos steps down, a single line from his first Amazon job ad posted 27 years ago tells you everything about his obsession with speed

Analysis banner
Jeff Bezos JFK center
Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has always been obsessed with speed.

  • Twenty-seven years ago, Jeff Bezos posted Amazon’s first-ever job ad.
  • It tells you everything you need to know about his obsession with speed.
  • As Bezos steps down as CEO, his successor, Andy Jassy, will likely continue this obsession.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Amazon’s motto may be “customer obsession,” but it has another infatuation – speed.

Amazon’s brand identity has long rested on the promise of getting parcels to customers as quickly as possible. Its founder Jeff Bezos stepped down as CEO on Monday, to take on the role of executive chairman, but it seems unlikely this ethos will change.

Andy Jassy, Amazon’s new CEO, specifically mentioned Amazon’s speed in a a memo sent to staff right after Bezos named him as his successor. Jassy said the importance of “consistently speedy, outstanding delivery” was one of the key lessons he’s learned from Bezos during his 24 years at the company.

Acceleration is a logical progression for a company whose guiding light has always been speed for the sake of customer convenience, and this philosophy was on show in one of Bezos’ first pieces of public communication after setting up Amazon 27 years ago.

In a 2019 Instagram post, Bezos reflected on the very first job ad he posted for the company, on August 23 1994.

I posted our first job opening 25 years ago today, when I hadn’t even settled on the name Amazon yet. Feels like yesterday. #gratitude

A post shared by Jeff Bezos (@jeffbezos) on Aug 22, 2019 at 4:09pm PDT

The ad is for a computer programmer who Bezos says should be able to build and maintain complex systems “in about one-third the time that most competent people think possible.”

Doing things faster and better than other companies has turned Amazon into one of the most powerful firms in the world, and made Bezos the richest man on the planet – although this year he has occasionally jostled for the top-spot with Tesla CEO Elon Musk.

It’s an ethos that drives him on, because he thinks the alternative is Amazon’s death.

Read more: Andy Jassy will be the next CEO of Amazon. Insiders dish on what it’s like to work for Jeff Bezos’ successor who built AWS into a $40 billion business.

Bezos’ obsession with speed is far from universally loved inside Amazon. Numerous reports on Amazon’s working conditions have described the intense pressure employees face to stay on rate, the company term for the number of items they’re expected to process per hour.

Over the course of the pandemic, the size of Amazon’s workforce has exploded. It added 427,300 employees from January to October 2020. The company is also faced off against a highly-publicised union drive in Alabama, posting anti-union flyers in the bathrooms and handing out merchandise telling workers to “vote no.” Although the Alabama workers voted against forming a union, another union campaign is underway in New York.

Andy Jassy
Andy Jassy, Amazon’s new CEO.

It seems highly likely that if Jassy wants to carry on Bezos’ legacy of constant acceleration, he’ll be up against increasing pressure from workers: A January survey by Insider found more than 40% of Amazon workers wished they were in a union.

Worker activism, along with heightened regulatory scrutiny, could be the biggest speed-bumps facing Jassy, Nicholas McQuire, SVP Enterprise Research at analytics company CCS Insight, told Insider.

“Bezos created the blueprint for internet businesses: rapid innovation, huge scale and relentless focus on the customer and few people on the planet have the DNA of managing high growth high innovation businesses at scale than Andy Jassy,” said McQuire.

Do you work for Amazon? Got a tip? Get in touch with this reporter at ihamilton@insider.com or iahamilton@protonmail.com.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Jeff Bezos will officially step down on Monday. Here are the top 5 things to know about his replacement Andy Jassy.

andy jassy amazon
Andy Jassy.

  • Jeff Bezos will step down from his role as Amazon CEO on Monday.
  • Bezos will be replaced by Andy Jassy, the current CEO of AWS.
  • He has been at Amazon for 24 years and is one of the highest-paid executives at the company.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos announced earlier this year that he was stepping down as the tech giant’s chief executive officer.

Bezos told shareholders that he will officially leave the position on July 5, a “sentimental” date – the same day that Amazon was incorporated in 1994.

In a letter to employees, Bezos said he will transition to executive chairman and will focus on “new products and early initiatives” in the third quarter.

He will be replaced by Andy Jassy, the current CEO of Amazon Web Services, the company’s cloud platform.

Here are 5 things to know about the new CEO, based on what over a dozen current and former employees told Insider in interviews published in January.

Jassy has been at Amazon for about as long as Bezos, 24 years to be exact.

Jassy joined Amazon in 1997, the same year the company went public. The 53-year-old built AWS from the ground up within the past two decades and became CEO of the cloud platform in 2016. Analyst Dan Ives described him to Insider in a previous interview as “one of the most powerful leaders not just within the cloud and tech sector but in the world of business.”

Jassy is a close confidant of Bezos.

Jassy served as a so-called “shadow” advisor to Bezos at one point, joining the chief executive in high-level meetings. In his letter to staff announcing his exit as CEO, Bezos said Jassy will be an “outstanding leader.”

Jassy is one of the highest-paid executives at Amazon.

He has raked in a total of more than $20 million within the past three years. In 2016 alone, Jassy earned over $36 million while Bezos made about $1.7 million in total, according to CNBC.

Jassy was reportedly considered for the role of CEO at Microsoft and Uber.

Ex-Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer approached Jassy at one point about replacing him as chief executive of the company, a person familiar with the discussion told Insider’s Ashley Stewart and Eugene Kim. There was also a rumor that Jassy was considered to take over as Uber CEO after Travis Kalanick stepped down in 2017.

He’s outspoken in regard to political and social issues.

Jassy has spoken out against the police killings of Black Americans and in favor of court decisions to make it illegal to discriminate against members of the LGBTQ community, among other calls to action. Jassy has also spoken out against former President Donald Trump’s contempt for Amazon and helmed AWS amid the company’s decision to ban Parler, a social-media app popular among the far-right.

Read what more than a dozen current and former Amazon employees told Insider about what it’s like to work for Jassy.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Insiders reveal what it’s really like working at Amazon when it comes to hiring, firing, performance reviews, and more

Jeff Bezos and Andy Jassy surrounded by images of workers and robots in Amazon warehouses
Amazon’s Jeff Bezos and Andy Jassy.

  • Insider is investigating Amazon’s workplace amid a major effort to unionize the company.
  • The e-commerce and cloud giant has a complex performance-review system some employees say is unfair.
  • Amazon is investigating allegations of gender bias in its Prime division after Insider reporting.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Amazon is the second-largest US employer and still one of the fastest-growing in the country. It offers income and benefits to well over 1 million people, and it’s been a source of jobs and shopping convenience during the pandemic.

With that level of influence, Amazon’s operations have come under intense scrutiny, which has prompted a nationwide unionization effort. The following covers everything you need to know about what it’s like to work at the company.


How Amazon culls its workforce

Andy Jassy
Under outgoing CEO Andy Jassy, Amazon’s cloud unit has built up an impressive roster of cloud security partners – but they often also work with competitors Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud.

Insider is investigating Amazon’s system for improving, or ousting, employees deemed underperformers. Once managers label workers as struggling, they are put on a “Focus” coaching plan. If they fail there, the workers are moved to another program called “Pivot,” and then finally to an internal company jury that decides their fate at the company.

The system has been criticized by some current and former employees, who say it is unfairly stacked against them and can encourage managers to give bad reviews to good staff. Amazon says it gives managers tools to help employees improve and advance in their careers. “This includes resources for employees who are not meeting expectations and may require additional coaching. If an employee believes they are not receiving a fair assessment of their performance, they have multiple channels where they can raise this,” a company spokesperson said recently.

Amazon has a goal to get rid of a certain number of employees each year, which is called unregretted attrition. Some managers at the company told Insider they felt so much pressure to meet the target that they hire people who they intend to fire within a year.

Read more


The company has been hit with allegations of bias

amazon logo

There’s been a rash of lawsuits filed against Amazon alleging gender and racial bias. In May, five current and former female employees sued the company Amazon, claiming “abusive mistreatment by primarily white male managers.”

In February, Charlotte Newman, a Black Amazon manager, filed a suit alleging gender discrimination and sexual harassment. And last year, a high-profile female engineer called on the company to fix what she saw as a “harassment culture,” Insider reported.

An Amazon spokesperson said the company investigated the cases, found no evidence to support the allegations, and doesn’t tolerate discrimination or harassment.

Read more


Amazon’s warehouses churn through workers

Robots in a UK Amazon warehouse
Robotic Amazon warehouses use robots to ferry shelves of items around the warehouse floor. Above, a photo taken in an Amazon warehouse in the UK.

The company’s fulfillment centers employ hundreds of thousands of people, offering pay and benefits that are competitive versus other retail-industry jobs. But the work can be grueling, some staff don’t stick around long, and there are growing efforts to unionize this modern blue-collar workforce.

Amazon warehouses are partly automated, using robots that zip around the shop floor fetching pallets of merchandise and bringing them to employees who pick the correct items and pack them for shipping. The company hires thousands of extra temporary workers each year to support a surge in orders during the holiday shopping period.

During the pandemic, online orders have jumped at an unusual time for Amazon. It prompted an unprecedented hiring spree last year but caused tension with workers concerned about entering warehouses that could spread the virus. These issues came to a head earlier this year, when employees at a fulfillment center in Bessemer, Alabama, voted on whether to form a union. The effort failed, but there’s a bigger union push gathering steam.

In his final shareholder letter as CEO earlier this year, Jeff Bezos defended Amazon’s working conditions, but said the company needed “to do a better job for our employees.”

Read more


Amazon’s delivery network relies on thousands of drivers

Amazon delivery drivers pee bottle 4x3

The company partners with UPS, FedEx, and the US Postal Service, but it also operates a massive fleet of in-house delivery vehicles. These vans are driven by a combination of employees, third-party courier services, and contract workers.

Amazon is known for imposing strict time constraints on drivers and tracking how many times they stop and how fast they drive. While the company factors in break times – a 30-minute lunch and two 15-minute breaks – some drivers say they either can’t or don’t want to take them.

Earlier this year, a US lawmaker tweeted that Amazon workers have to pee in bottles. The company denied this, but multiple drivers confirmed it was part of the job. Amazon later apologized and said drivers have trouble finding restrooms because of traffic and being on rural routes, adding that the issue has been exacerbated by closed public bathrooms during the pandemic.

Read more


How to get a job at Amazon

Amazon job fair 2017
Job seekers line up to apply during “Amazon Jobs Day” at a fulfillment center in Fall River, Massachusetts, in August 2017.

Amazon remains an important employer that is growing quickly. Unlike some of its Big Tech rivals, the company offers a range of positions, from highly technical roles to blue-collar jobs. It’s recruiting methods range from massive job fairs to tough one-on-one interviews.

The company ranks among the top employers among technical students. In a survey published last year, Amazon came 10th in a survey of engineering students, beating out Intel and IBM but trailing Tesla and SpaceX.

Read more

Read the original article on Business Insider

Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos will officially step down on July 5. Here are the top 5 things to know about his replacement, Andy Jassy.

andy jassy amazon
Andy Jassy.

  • Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos will step down on July 5, the same date Amazon was incorporated in 1994.
  • Bezos will be replaced by Andy Jassy, the current CEO of AWS.
  • He has been at Amazon for 24 years and is one of the highest-paid executives at the company.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos announced earlier this year that he was stepping down as the tech giant’s chief executive officer.

And on Wednesday, Bezos told shareholders that he will officially leave the position on July 5, a “sentimental” date – the same day that Amazon was incorporated in 1994.

In a letter to employees, Bezos said he will transition to executive chairman and will focus on “new products and early initiatives” in the third quarter.

He will be replaced by Andy Jassy, the current CEO of Amazon Web Services, the company’s cloud platform.

Here are 5 things to know about the new CEO, based on what over a dozen current and former employees told Insider in interviews published in January.

Jassy has been at Amazon for about as long as Bezos has, 24 years to be exact.

Jassy joined Amazon in 1997, the same year the company went public. The 53-year-old built AWS from the ground up within the past two decades and became CEO of the cloud platform in 2016. Analyst Dan Ives described him to Insider in a previous interview as “one of the most powerful leaders not just within the cloud and tech sector but in the world of business.”

Jassy is a close confidant of Bezos.

Jassy served as a so-called “shadow” advisor to Bezos at one point, joining the chief executive in high-level meetings. In his letter to staff announcing his exit as CEO, Bezos said Jassy will be an “outstanding leader.”

Jassy is one of the highest-paid executives at Amazon.

He has raked in a total of more than $20 million within the past three years. In 2016 alone, Jassy earned over $36 million while Bezos made about $1.7 million in total, according to CNBC.

Jassy was reportedly considered for the role of CEO at Microsoft and Uber.

Ex-Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer approached Jassy at one point about replacing him as chief executive of the company, a person familiar with the discussion told Insider’s Ashley Stewart and Eugene Kim. There was also a rumor that Jassy was considered to take over as Uber CEO after Travis Kalanick stepped down in 2017.

He’s outspoken in regard to political and social issues.

Jassy has spoken out against the police killings of Black Americans and in favor of court decisions to make it illegal to discriminate against members of the LGBTQ community, among other calls to action. Jassy has also spoken out against former President Donald Trump’s contempt for Amazon and helmed AWS amid the company’s decision to ban Parler, a social-media app popular among the far-right.

Read what over a dozen current and former Amazon employees told Insider about what it’s like to work for Jassy.

Read the original article on Business Insider

500 Amazon workers sign a letter asking Jeff Bezos and Andy Jassy to support Palestinians and sever contracts with the Israel Defense Forces

Andy Jassy Jeff Bezos
Andy Jassy (left) will take over as Amazon CEO from Jeff Bezos (right) in Q3 of this year.

  • More than 500 Amazon workers signed a letter asking CEO Jeff Bezos and top exec Andy Jassy to support Palestinians.
  • The workers specifically asked that Amazon sever contracts with the Israel Defense Forces.
  • Amazon signed a cloud computing deal with Israel this week worth more than $1 billion.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A group of more than 500 Amazon workers signed an internal letter asking its top executives Jeff Bezos and Andy Jassy to support Palestinians, The Verge reports.

Andy Jassy is set to take over from Jeff Bezos as Amazon CEO later this year.

“As Amazonians, we believe it is our moral responsibility to stand in solidarity with and speak out on behalf of the millions of Palestinians who, for decades, have not only been dispossessed of their voices and victimhood, but, in essence, their humanity,” the letter reads.

“Amazon employs Palestinians in Tel Aviv and Haifa offices and around the world. Ignoring the suffering faced by Palestinians and their families at home erases our Palestinian coworkers,” it adds.

The letter makes four specific demands of Amazon’s senior leadership, including severing contracts with government and corporate entities associated with human-rights violations. The letter names the Israel Defense Forces as an example.

Amazon Web Services, the company’s cloud division, signed a deal Monday with the Israeli government to provide cloud services to the country’s military and public sector. Google also signed a similar deal.

Israel and the militant group Hamas agreed to a cease-fire Thursday after 10 days of the bloodiest fighting the region had seen in years. The Israeli bombardment of Gaza killed at least 232 Palestinians, including 65 children and 39 women, according to Reuters, citing health authorities. Nearly 2,000 people in Gaza, the Hamas-controlled territory that is under an Israeli blockade, were injured, and the UN said about 58,000 were displaced.

Militants in Gaza fired more than 4,300 rockets that killed at least 12 people in Israel, including two children and a soldier.

The letter also asks Amazon to start a relief fund for Palestinians affected by military violence, to publicly acknowledge “the continued assault upon Palestinians’ basic human rights under an illegal occupation,” and to reject publicly and internally any definition of antisemitism that says criticism of Israel is inherently antisemitic.

“It is important to clarify that our stance against the Israeli military occupation of the Palestinian people is not a stance against the Jewish people. Antisemitism has no place in our cause. Our narrative is a stance against a state continuing to perpetuate settle colonial violence against an indigenous people: the Palestinians,” the workers wrote in the letter.

Amazon isn’t the only tech company where employees have asked leadership to support Palestinians. More than 250 Google employees signed a petition asking the Google to end certain contracts with Israel.

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