Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s once highly anticipated book sold only 71 copies the last week of July

Andrew Cuomo
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

  • Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s second memoir has undersold. Last year he inked a book deal worth $5.1 million.
  • Crown ceased promoting Cuomo’s book in March amid several sexual harassment allegations.
  • Cuomo resigned on Tuesday after a damning report from the New York attorney general’s office.
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Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s once highly anticipated book detailing his management of the COVID-19 crisis sold only 71 copies during the last week of July, a data provider for the publishing industry, BookScan told The New York Times.

Fewer than 50,000 copies of Cuomo’s book, “American Crisis: Leadership Lessons From the Covid-19 Pandemic,” have been sold since it was published in October 2020, The Times reported, citing BookScan.

An imprint of Penguin Random House, Crown, beat out several other competitors for the book, offering Cuomo $5.1 million for the book deal, according to The Times.

His previous memoir “All Things Possible: Setbacks and Success in Politics and Life” also undersold. Harper, an imprint of Harper Collins, ordered 200,000 copies, but only sold 3,200 between October 2014 and April 2017 – meaning he made about $245 per book sale, according to the Los Angeles Times.

However, at the time of his second book deal, Cuomo’s popularity was surging over his response to the pandemic, which included daily updates (with slides), that was in stark contrast to that of the Trump administration’s handling of the spread of the novel coronavirus in early 2020.

“With his no-nonsense daily briefings – viewed by millions of people around the world – a commitment to truth-telling, and a science-based plan for flattening the curve, Andrew Cuomo filled that void,” Penguin Random House said in an August 2020 news release.

Crown, however, ceased promoting Cuomo’s book in March in the midst of several sexual harassment allegations and accusations that he had covered up COVID-19 deaths in nursing homes, The Guardian reported. Crown did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment about the deal; Crown told The Times, “we never comment on contractual matters or financial arrangements with any of our authors.”

Cuomo announced his resignation on Tuesday, following a 165-page report from New York Attorney General Letitia James that found he sexually harassed 11 women. Cuomo has denied any wrongdoing.

“In my mind, I have never crossed the line with anyone,” Cuomo said in a speech on Tuesday. “But I didn’t realize the extent to which the line has been redrawn.”

“I never did and I never would intentionally disrespect a woman,” he added later, addressing his daughters.

It is unclear whether or not Cuomo will be required to pay back the remainder of his advance since resigning.

Cuomo’s office could not immediately be reached for comment.

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Lingua Franca offers to restitch $285 ‘Cuomosexual’ and ‘Cuomo for president’ sweaters

Screen Shot 2020 03 31 at 10.15.51 AM
Lingua Franca, a New York City fashion boutique, also sells “dr. fauci fan club” sweaters in addition to the “cuomo for president” line.

  • Customers who shelled out nearly $300 for “Cuomosexual” sweaters have been offered a mulligan.
  • Boutique store Lingua Franca notified shoppers that they can get a restitch for free.
  • “Cuomosexual” and “Cuomo for president” embroideries can be replaced with a new slogan.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

For anyone who spent nearly $300 on a “Cuomosexual” or “Cuomo for president” sweater and has been too embarrassed to wear it since 2020, a boutique store is offering a free restitch.

The pricey merch supporting outgoing New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo had a flash in the pan as a fashion trend in spring 2020.

Now that Cuomo has announced his resignation amid a sexual harassment scandal and several others, the custom knit sweaters lack the caché that once justified their $285 price tag, at least in the minds of those who bought them.

“In light of recent news, we feel it is our duty to update the stitching on any ‘Cuomosexual’ or ‘cuomo for president’ sweaters that were purchased last year, to a new phrase of your choice,” the Lingua Franca boutique store announced in an Instagram post on Wednesday.

The redo will be free of charge, according to Lingua Franca.

A post shared by Lingua Franca (@linguafrancanyc)

When the merch first went on sale, Lingua Franca touted them as “a line of sustainably-sourced, fair trade luxury cashmere sweaters, all hand-stitched by women in NYC.”

With Cuomo headed out the door after 11 women had their accounts of sexual misconduct corroborated by New York Attorney General Letitia James’ 165-page report, Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul will become the Empire State’s first female governor in 13 days.

In some corners of the internet, Cuomo became a sudden sex symbol during his star turn at the outset of the coronavirus pandemic.

Ranging from speculation about his dating life to whether the governor wore nipple rings, the phenomenon of “Cuomosexuals” snowballed into an internet meme.

Those interested in a restitch can contact Lingua Franca at info@linguafranca.nyc.

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Cuomo considered doing a ‘series of person-on-the-street’ interviews to convince voters ‘he was doing a great job,’ according to report

Andrew Cuomo greets voters on a rope line and taps a Cuomo-Hochul sign during the 2014 gubernatorial campaign in New York.
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

  • Outgoing New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s team considered a longshot strategy to keep him in power.
  • Some aides pitched running “a series of person-on-the-street” ads, according to the New York Times.
  • Cuomo was also reportedly ready to resign almost a full week before Tuesday’s announcement.
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In a desperate attempt to stave off impeachment, outgoing New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo reportedly weighed running “person-on-the-street” ads featuring voters boasting about his record, according to a new report.

The nearly three-term governor, who announced his plans to resign on Tuesday, was looking for a way to turn the tides against an increasingly inevitable impeachment trial following the bombshell report from New York Attorney General Letitia James corroborating accounts from 11 women who accused Cuomo of sexual misconduct.

According to The New York Times, Cuomo advisers looked into “preparing and running a series of person-on-the-street television advertisements featuring New Yorkers who thought he was doing a great job, according to two people with knowledge of the discussions.”

The idea was ultimately scrapped, according to the Times.

When Cuomo officially steps down in two weeks, Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul of Buffalo will become the first female governor in the history of the Empire State.

Once feared by Democrats in the state legislature, Cuomo’s staff determined that just 12 lawmakers in the Assembly were still in his corner following the AG report, the Times reported.

He was also ready to resign as early as last Wednesday, but ultimately changed his mind after lunch that day, according to the report.

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CNN’s Brian Stelter tells Stephen Colbert the Chris Cuomo situation is ‘definitely awkward’ and ‘you’ve got to have boundaries’

Brian Stelter
Brian Stelter attends the 12th Annual CNN Heroes: An All-Star Tribute at American Museum of Natural History on December 9, 2018 in New York City.

  • Brian Stelter told Stephen Colbert that the situation with Chris Cuomo is “really complicated.”
  • There’s “no page for this” scenario in the “journalism ethics book,” Stelter said.
  • Cuomo has faced criticism for advising his brother, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, on a sexual harassment scandal.
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CNN’s Brian Stelter appeared on “The Late Show with Stephen Colbert” on Tuesday, addressing the ongoing criticism the cable network is facing over host Chris Cuomo in relation to the scandal surrounding his brother, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

“Some people are mad at him,” Stelter told Colbert of how people at CNN feel about Cuomo in relation to interactions with his brother. Stelter described the situation as “really complicated” and “definitely awkward.”

There’s “no page for this” scenario in the “journalism ethics book,” Stelter said.

Cuomo in May apologized after it came to light that he’d advised his brother on how to handle sexual harassment allegations. The New York Times on Tuesday reported that Cuomo regularly spoke with the New York governor over the past week and urged him to resign. The governor announced his resignation, effective in two weeks, on Tuesday.

Stelter told Colbert that he also confirmed with a source that Cuomo has been in contact with his brother. When Colbert asked if Cuomo was the source Stelter said no, adding, “You’ve got to have boundaries. You’ve got to draw a line.”

“Why? He doesn’t!” Colbert replied.

“I think he does actually,” Stelter said.

Stelter said CNN had barred Cuomo from speaking about his brother on air as the scandal has escalated.

“Then why didn’t they rule that way when his brother was on pretty much every night during the COVID crisis?” Colbert asked. “That seems like an odd conflict of rules.”

The governor regularly appeared on Cuomo’s CNN show throughout the pandemic, particularly at a time when New York was considered the epicenter of the crisis.

Cuomo is not on air this week, taking a break for what he said was a pre-planned vacation for his birthday.

Last week, the New York attorney general’s office released a 165-page report that said the governor “sexually harassed a number of current and former New York State employees by, among other things, engaging in unwelcome and nonconsensual touching, as well as making numerous offensive comments of a suggestive and sexual nature that created a hostile work environment for women.”

The governor has consistently pushed against the allegations, and continued this trend as he announced his plans to resign. “In my mind I’ve never crossed the line with anyone,” he said.

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‘Cuomo’s resignation is necessary and long overdue,’ Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez says in tweets on abuse of power

AOC
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., on Monday, August 24, 2020.

  • Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced his resignation Tuesday amid several sexual harassment allegations.
  • Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez critiqued institutions that allow abuse of power via Twitter.
  • “The intentional environment of fear & intimidation harassers create is far from a mistake,” said AOC.
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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a Democrat from New York, called New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s resignation “necessary and long overdue.”

Cuomo announced on Tuesday that he would resign one week after a hefty 165-page report from the New York attorney general’s office found he sexually harassed 11 women.

Cuomo has denied wrongdoing. “In my mind, I never crossed the line with anyone, but I didn’t realize the extent to which the line is redrawn,” Cuomo said when announcing his resignation.

Ocasio-Cortez and other Democrats from New York began calling on Cuomo to resign in March of this year following a string of scandals plaguing the governor.

In her Tweets, Ocasio-Cortex appeared to refer to the AG investigation’s findings that a culture of bullying existed in the governor’s office, including reports that his office retaliated against his accusers.

Specifically, she critiqued the institutions and environments that allow for harassment and abuse of power.

“There is a huge difference between having an awkward interaction and discussing / learning from it vs. mobilizing entire networks and institutions to bring in victims, silence coverage, and retaliate against those who report abuse,” she wrote. “Trying to blur that line helps abuses continue.”

Ocasio-Cortez concluded the string of tweets by saying: “Gov. Cuomo’s resignation is necessary and long overdue. But there is still a large amount of work ahead to account for and reverse the ways our institutions were molded over years to maximize the impunity and lack of transparency necessary for these abuses to unfold as they did.”

Cuomo will be succeeded by New York’s soon-to-be first female governor, Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul, 14 days from his resignation announcement.

Watch Cuomo’s resignation announcement below:

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Biden said Cuomo did a ‘hell of a job’ as governor and added that ‘it’s so sad’ he had to resign amid a sexual misconduct scandal

Joe Biden and Andrew Cuomo
Joe Biden appears with New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo to unveil plans for new area infrastructure projects on July 27, 2015 in New York City.

  • Biden on Tuesday said Gov. Andrew Cuomo did a “hell of a job” on issues like infrastructure.
  • “That’s why it’s so sad,” Biden added in comments that came after Cuomo announced he was resigning.
  • Cuomo is stepping down amid a sexual harassment scandal, facing allegations from multiple women.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

President Joe Biden on Tuesday said that New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo did a “hell of a job” while in office and that’s why “it’s so sad” he’s now resigning.

“He’s done a hell of a job – on everything from access to voting to infrastructure to a whole range of things. That’s why it’s so sad,” Biden said while taking questions from reporters following Cuomo’s resignation announcement, which was prompted by multiple allegations of sexual harassment. The president was explicitly commenting on what Cuomo’s done in office, and not his personal behavior.

Another reporter pressed Biden on whether he could “really say” that Cuomo did a “hell of a job” given “he’s accused of sexually harassing women on the job.”

Biden pushed back, saying: “Should he remain as governor is one question, and women should be believed when they make accusations that … on the face of them make sense and are investigated … and the judgment was made what they said was correct – that’s one thing.”

“The question was, ‘Did he do a good job on infrastructure?’ That was the question. He did,” Biden added.

Biden previously called on Cuomo to resign after New York State Attorney General Letitia James’ office issued a damning 165-page report that said the governor “sexually harassed a number of current and former New York State employees by, among other things, engaging in unwelcome and nonconsensual touching, as well as making numerous offensive comments of a suggestive and sexual nature that created a hostile work environment for women.”

The president on Tuesday said he respected Cuomo’s decision to resign.

Cuomo has repeatedly pushed back on the allegations against him, and continued to do so while announcing his plans to step down. “In my mind I’ve never crossed the line with anyone,” said Cuomo, whose resignation will be effective in 14 days.

Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul, a former congresswoman, is set to take over following Cuomo’s departure and will be the first female governor in the history of New York State.

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CNN’s Chris Cuomo still advising his brother, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo: WaPo

chris cuomo andrew cuomo cnn
Chris Cuomo on Cuomo Prime Time Monday night

CNN host Chris Cuomo is continuing to advise his brother, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, amid calls for the latter to resign over sexual harassment, The Washington Post reported Monday.

Citing “people familiar with the situation,” The Post said that the host of CNN’s “Cuomo Prime Time” is one of a handful of people advising the embattled politician.

Last week, the New York Attorney General’s office released a report concluding that the Democratic governor had engaged in serial sexual harassment, spurring a fresh round of calls for him to step down. Cuomo has denied wrongdoing.

A spokesperson for CNN referred Insider to previous statements by Chris Cuomo and the network and noted that the anchor had not taken part in any “official” conversations as previously promised.

In May, the cable news network stood by its anchor after The Post reported he had taken part in strategy calls with his brother’s communications team, raising eyebrows among media watchdogs. That collaboration was detailed in the New York AG report.

“Chris has not been involved in CNN’s extensive coverage of the allegations against Governor Cuomo – on air or behind the scenes,” CNN said in May 2021. “In part because, as he has said on his show, he could never be objective. But also because he often serves as a sounding board for his brother. However, it was inappropriate to engage in conversations that included members of the Governor’s staff, which Chris acknowledges. He will not participate in such conversations going forward.”

At the time, CNN defended his actions by noting that their 9 p.m. weekday anchor had not taken part in coverage concerning his brother. Cuomo himself apologized to colleagues. “To them, I’m truly sorry.”

Cuomo is on vacation this week, as he announced last Friday on CNN. “I’ll be fishing,” he said.

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Four ways it could end for Andrew Cuomo as impeachment looms

Andrew Cuomo is pictured in silhouette against a New York City skyline view from behind his podium at an event.
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo

  • New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has few options left in his battle for political survival.
  • Eleven women’s accounts of sexual harassment were corroborated in the New York AG’s report.
  • Cuomo has other scandals to deal with, making a 2022 reelection bid steeper than ever before.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Since March, when he began to increase the number of his public appearances, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has increasingly evoked the legacy of his late father, former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo.

Until last week’s bombshell report from New York Attorney General Letitia James, it seemed reasonable to assume both father and son would have three terms in Albany’s corner office under their belts by the end of 2022.

But with the 165 page James report corroborating the accounts of 11 women accusing him of various forms of sexual misconduct leading to calls for his resignation from the Empire State’s entire congressional delegation, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and President Joe Biden, Cuomo’s days in the governor’s mansion may be numbered.

How exactly it plays out depends heavily on the Assembly’s impeachment investigation, which is set to heat up after this Friday’s deadline for the governor’s office to submit evidence in Cuomo’s defense.

Here are four plausible scenarios on how this scandal-ridden saga ends for Andrew Cuomo, all but one of which involve him forgoing the fourth term bid that eluded his father.

Impeachment

Through the spring, impeachment seemed like the least likely possibility.

Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie, a Bronx Democrat, proceeded slowly with the impeachment investigation launched back in March and cautioned that the AG investigation may not hasten any of it.

Heastie changed his tune once the report was released and called for Cuomo’s resignation, injecting a newfound urgency into the impeachment investigation and making removal from office not only a genuine possibility, but one of the most likely outcomes.

New York’s impeachment process is similar to that of the US Congress, with a simple majority in the Assembly and a two-thirds one in the Senate required to remove Cuomo.

A Monday press conference from Heastie and Assemblyman Charles Levine, a Long Island Democrat in charge of the probe, made clear that once the Friday deadline passes, lawmakers will move forward with the nuts and bolts of impeachment proceedings.

However, state law requires the Senate to wait 30 days after articles of impeachment are filed before they can begin the trial, giving Cuomo until October at the earliest to prepare for that showdown.

Resignation

Cuomo has refused to resign on several occasions, even going so far as to accuse New York lawmakers of “bowing to cancel culture.”

With no allies left to defend him beyond his own attorney, Cuomo is more isolated than ever before.

Resignation would bring about the swiftest end to the saga, and it would arguably allow Cuomo to retain some degree of dignity and preserve whatever political future he has left.

The most tempting window for Cuomo to resign may fall between the Assembly vote and the Senate trial, which was the same point at which former US President Richard Nixon chose to resign amid the Watergate scandal.

As Laura Nahmias recently wrote for New York’s Intelligencer, “Heastie badly wants the Assembly’s Judiciary Committee to create an airtight, legally bulletproof, and dispassionate case against Cuomo, so the famously slippery governor can’t somehow escape on a technicality, or distract from the shocking sexual harassment charges against him by nitpicking holes in the legal proceedings.”

This could explain why Cuomo would wait until impeachment proceedings get under way before deciding to resign, but given the pattern he’s demonstrated over the past five months, no one should hold their breath.

The three term off ramp

Cuomo has reportedly been working on brokering a deal with the Assembly to get out of the impeachment predicament.

In exchange for his promise not to run again in 2022, the Assembly would hold off from impeaching him, according to The City.

Heastie denied the notion at his Monday press conference, telling reporters, “I am not negotiating any deals.”

From Cuomo’s perspective, this would be the best compromise he could reach, and he would at least tie his father when it comes to the length of their tenures as governor.

For Cuomo’s accusers, such a deal would let the governor get off far too easy.

Attorney Debra Katz, who represents former staffer Charlotte Bennett, has remained adamant that justice for her client involves the legislature holding Cuomo accountable.

“Further delay is an affront to the women who came forward and to survivors everywhere,” Katz wrote in a statement last week.

A run for a fourth term

This would be a continuation of what Cuomo has already been doing for months: keep holding events in front of friendly audiences, rally the base, and buy time.

Cuomo could try to rely on the public losing interest as the impeachment investigation drags on, hoping for polling to show a reversal from the new majority of New Yorkers who want him to leave office. That number is up to 70%, according to the latest Quinnipiac survey, with 55% of New Yorkers saying he should be charged with a crime.

Cuomo hasn’t ruled out a fourth term, and he has around $20 million in campaign funds ready to go for reelection in 2022. Despite the scandals mounting through March and April, he still raised over $2 million since being accused of sexual harassment by multiple women.

While this option could leave his reputation more tarnished than under any of the other scenarios, Cuomo could choose to rely on his campaign war chest to fend off a primary challenger and count on traditionally poor statewide performances from Republicans to secure a fourth term.

The last Republican to take the governor’s office from Democratic control was George Pataki in 1994. His opponent was Mario Cuomo.

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New York Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul is preparing to take over for Andrew Cuomo: report

New York Lt. Gov Kathy Hochul campaigns behind a "CUOMO-HOCHUL" sign in the 2014 governor's race.
New York Lt. Gov Kathy Hochul.

  • New York’s lieutenant governor is already making preparations to take over the Empire State’s top job.
  • Kathy Hochul would be the first woman to serve as New York governor if Andrew Cuomo were to resign.
  • She would also step in if a majority of the Assembly votes to impeach him.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

New York Lt. Gov. Kathy Hochul has reportedly begun preparations to staff up in the governor’s office if and when she needs to replace Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

Hochul has “sought advice on potential first steps in office, as well as whom to hire and which members of Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s administration might stay on if he resigned or was removed from office,” according to Jimmy Vielkind of the Wall Street Journal.

Hochul is gearing up for what happens if Cuomo is impeached or resigns after bombshell revelations in New York State Attorney General Letitia James’ report of the three-term governor sexually harassing 11 women and creating a “hostile work environment.”

Impeachment has gone from a remote possibility to a likely end to Cuomo’s tenure in office following the report and more calls for his resignation, ratcheting up pressure in his months-long fight for political survival amid multiple ongoing scandals.

As a former staffer for the late Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Hochul has connections across New York politics that go back decades.

If Cuomo resigns or gets removed through impeachment, Hochul would take office and serve out the rest of his term until 2023. If either scenario plays out, Hochul would be New York’s first female governor.

Hochul spent the last several months holding limited public events with minimal press availability, a stark departure from her reputation as an omnipresent state official who has been to all 62 counties in the Empire State.

That changed last week, when she released a statement condemning her boss in the how the report “documented repulsive and unlawful behavior by the governor.”

She stopped short of calling on him to resign, and cited her duty in the line of succession.

Hochul’s statement came on the heels of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi calling on Cuomo to resign, joining the entire New York congressional delegation in making the same plea.

Despite the turmoil in the governor’s office last week, Hochul and Cuomo did not speak to each other even once, according to the Wall Street Journal.

“Not only does she know all the players in the Democratic Party and the government, she’s respected by them,” New York State Democratic Committee Chairman Jay Jacobs told the Journal.

“I don’t think it’s going to take much for her to step up,” he added.

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Top Cuomo aide Melissa DeRosa resigns

Secretary to the Governor Melissa DeRosa listens as New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks to reporters during a news conference, Wednesday, June 23, 2021, in New York. She is wearing a white dress and has her arms crossed.
Secretary to the Governor Melissa DeRosa listens as New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks to reporters during a news conference, Wednesday, June 23, 2021, in New York.

  • Melissa DeRosa worked for the state of New York for the last decade.
  • Last week, New York State Attorney General’s office released a report that found that Gov. Andrew Cuomo sexually harassed 11 women.
  • The report said DeRosa helped the governor craft responses to multiple allegations of sexual harassment.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Melissa DeRosa, top aide to New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, announced her resignation Sunday night as the governor faces sexual harassment charges and calls for his impeachment, The Wall Street Journal reported.

“It has been the greatest honor of my life to serve the people of New York for the last 10 years,” DeRosa said in a statement. “Personally, the past 2 years have been emotionally and mentally trying. I am forever grateful for the opportunity to have worked with such talented and committed colleagues on behalf of our state.”

On August 3, the office of New York State Attorney General Letitia James released a 168-page investigative report and announced that its independent investigators found that Gov. Andrew Cuomo sexually harassed 11 women.

DeRosa was mentioned repeatedly throughout the report. She was identified by investigators as the person who decided to release confidential files about Lindsey Boylan, the first woman to come forward with accusations against Cuomo, following Boylan’s December 13 tweet accusing the governor of sexually harassing her.

Additionally, the report said DeRosa helped the governor craft responses to multiple allegations of sexual harassment, prepare for press conferences, and identify former staffers who may have talked to reporters.

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