More than 650 tech workers at The New York Times have formed a union to fight for more diversity, pay equity, and job security

The New York Times building is seen on June 30, 2020 in New York City.
The New York Times building.

  • More than 650 tech workers at The New York Times have formed a union called the Tech Times Guild.
  • The union said workers are facing “unexplained termination and opaque promotion processes.”
  • It’s organizing the formation with the NewsGuild union and awaiting recognition from the Times.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Tech workers at The New York Times on Tuesday announced they have formed a union and asked for recognition from the publication.

The union, called the Tech Times Guild, represents more than 650 employees who work for the digital side of the company in roles such as software engineers, data analysts and product managers.

The Tech Times Guild said in a statement on Twitter that it’s organizing its formation with the NewsGuild of New York – an editorial union of more than 3,000 media workers at the Times, The Daily Beast, The Nation, and other media outlets.

Tech workers weren’t included in the NewsGuild because they weren’t allowed to join. The Tech Times Guild is looking to become a separate bargaining unit from the NewsGuild. It would communicate with the Times management independently.

“As of now, we face a number of challenges, including sudden or unexplained termination, opaque promotion processes, unpaid overtime, and underinvestment in diverse representation,” the Tech Times Guild tweeted.

“Without a union, we lack the data or bargaining rights to address these issues,” it said, adding that the tech workers will be able to build digital products and platforms in a company, which is more “equitable, healthy and just.”

“At The New York Times, we have a long history of positive and productive relationships with unions, and we respect the right of all employees to decide whether or not joining a union is right for them,” The New York Times said in a statement to Insider.

“We will take time to review this request and discuss it soon with representatives of the NewsGuild,” it said, adding that the company wants to “make sure all voices are heard.”

The forming of the Tech Times Guild comes three months after more than 200 Google employees formed a union to promote inclusivity, transparency, and ensure the company acts ethically. At Amazon, there was a historic push to form the company’s first union in the US last month but workers voted against it on April 9th.

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Target’s 2020 sales soared by a massive $15 billion – bigger than the combined growth of the last 11 years

Target
Target store in the US.

  • Target topped Wall Street expectations, reporting a 21% rise fourth-quarter sales.
  • Sales through its same-day deliveries and store pick-up services soared 212% in the quarter.
  • Full-year sales jumped by more than $15 billion, bigger than the combined growth of the last 11 years.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Target Corp beat analysts’ estimates for holiday quarter sales on Tuesday, powered by the company’s same-day delivery and store pick-up services that helped fulfill resilient demand for home goods, toys, and groceries during the pandemic.

Over the past year, Target and Walmart consistently performed better than Wall Street expected as the deep-pocketed national retail chains amped up their online businesses during the health crisis and swiped market share from smaller rivals who rely more on their physical stores.

Still, Target held back on providing sales and earnings forecast for fiscal 2021, citing continued uncertainty over consumer shopping patterns amid the health crisis.

The company’s comparable sales rose 20.5% in the fourth quarter, comfortably beating analysts’ estimates for a 16.4% rise, according to IBES data from Refinitiv. Sales through its same-day deliveries and store pick-up services surged 212%, as consumers sought quicker ways to get their online purchases.

Analysts have, however, warned that the torrid pace of growth would be difficult to repeat in the coming months, as COVID-19 vaccine rollouts raise the promise of a return to something closer to pre-pandemic life.

Target’s comparable sales for the full year are expected to slip 3.6%, according to Wall Street brokerages. In February, Walmart said it expects sales and profit growth to slow this year, leading to a fall in its shares.

Total fourth-quarter revenue for Target rose 21.1% to $28.34 billion, beating the average estimate of $27.48 billion. Full-year sales rose by over $15 billion, larger than the combined growth of the last 11 years.

Net earnings surged 65.6% to $1.38 billion. On an adjusted basis, the company earned $2.67 per share.

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