17 pitch decks that startups trying to disrupt media and advertising used to raise millions from investors

Jeffrey Nicholson
Jeffrey Nicholson

  • Investors are pouring money into advertising, media, and marketing startups.
  • They’re trying to capitalize on changing consumer habits, marketers’ need to see their ads are working, and more.
  • Check out these 17 pitches to see how these startups sold their visions to VCs and other investors.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Investors are pouring money into startups that are trying to disrupt advertising, media, and marketing.

Insider has been tracking these startups that are using tech to capitalize on changing consumer media habits and marketers’ desire to reach new audiences and ensure their ads are working.

Check out these pitch decks that they’ve used to sell their vision and raise millions from PE and VC investors.

They range from tools that measure digital ad performance to platforms for people seeking out online entertainment.


Contextual advertising

Contextual advertising has become a buzzy area in adtech as the sector shifts away from the precision-targeting and tracking of individual users.

Founded seven years ago by two former Googlers, Seedtag specializes in contextual advertising – using data and artificial intelligence to place ads within relevant publisher content that users should be more likely to interact with.

Seedtag just raised a $40 million funding round, led by Oakley Capital.

See the pitch deck that helped contextual advertising firm Seedtag raise $40 million. The European adtech company now plans a US expansion.


Ad automation

Dan Pantelo started a performance marketing agency in college and pivoted to software after discovering that creative testing was the most important and time-consuming part of making ads.

Today, his marketing technology startup Marpipe claims to help advertisers figure out which ads perform best by automatically testing hundreds of variations.

Marpipe just raised $8 million in Series A for a total of $10 million raised to date.

The key pitch deck slides that helped an ad automation startup raise $10 million


Freelance consulting

Catalant CEO Patrick Petitti
Catalant CEO Patrick Petitti.

Investors are pouring millions into platforms like Catalant Technologies that connect companies to independent advertising and consulting professionals, a need that’s growing as people quit in the pandemic.

Catalant has raised more than $100 million by pitching itself as an alternative to consulting giants like McKinsey.

See the key slides a staffing platform used to raise more than $100 million from investors like Morningside CEO Gerald Chan


Marketing strategy

Ad agency vets Grant McDougall, Liza Nebel, and Matt Gross started BlueOcean in 2019, when they saw an opening to use machine learning to simplify market research and tell marketers how they and their competitors were performing. Now, they count Microsoft, Google, Cisco, Bloomingdale’s, and Diageo as clients.

The software-as-a-service startup just raised $15 million in Series A funding from private equity firm Insight Partners.

Pitch deck reveals how an AI startup that helps brands like Google and Microsoft plan their marketing raised $15 million


Data management tools

Google and Apple’s moves to clamp down on third-party cookies and the rise of online shopping have advertisers clamoring for help managing all their customer data so they can effectively market to them.

One such company is 4-year-old Amperity, which sells software that clients like Starbucks, Patagonia, and Crocs use to manage stats from sales, email, e-commerce, and loyalty card programs.

Amperity has raised $100 million in its Series D from existing investors including Tiger Global Management, Declaration Partners, and Madrona Venture Group, for a total of $187 million.

Here’s the pitch deck that helped a marketing tech startup raise $100 million at a $1 billion valuation to help brands manage their data


Out-of-home advertising platform

Outdoor advertising is coming back after being crushed during the pandemic, and adtech startup OneScreen.ai is hoping to cash in with a platform for brands to search, buy, run and measure their out-of-home ad campaigns.

OneScreen just raised $1.2 million in pre-seed funding in a round led by Florida-based fund TechFarms Capital with other investors including HubSpot cofounders Brian Halligan and Dharmesh Shah, Wayfair’s alumni fund Wayfund, Lola.com CEO Mike Volpe, and BuySellAds.com CEO Todd Garland.

See the pitch deck that Google, Hubspot and Wayfair alums used to raise $1.2 million to build the ‘Amazon of out-of-home advertising’


Consumer data-collection

Tracer started in 2015 as a unit of Gary Vaynerchuk’s ad agency VaynerMedia that automatically collects and organize data that isn’t personally identifiable. Led by Tracer co-founder and CEO Jeffrey Nicholson, it also offers free consulting services. It started by helping VaynerMedia oversee hundreds of millions in ad buys for clients like Oreo maker Mondelez; today, clients include other ad agencies like Labelium; Condé Nast; and pharma giant Sanofi.

Tracer recently raised $9.9 million in seed funding led by big names like former Walmart and Amazon exec Marc Lore and NBA star Kevin Durant’s firm Thirty Five Ventures.

Read the pitch deck a Gary Vaynerchuk-backed data startup used to raise $10 million from investors like Walmart’s ex-ecommerce CEO


Building lifetime customers

As people do more of their shopping online, marketers are trying to get them to become repeat customers.

Former Paypal and Facebook product and data analytics manager Emad Hasan says his startup Retina helps brands like Dollar Shave Club and Madison Reed acquire and keep customers by building lookalike audiences based on companies’ order history and shopper attributes.

It just raised $8 million in Series A funding from Alpha Intelligence Capital, Vertical Venture Partners, and others.

This investor deck helped a former Facebook product manager raise $8 million to help brands boost customers’ long-term value


Data-buying tools

Nick Jordan founded 5-year-old Narrative to let advertisers buy data without the need for data brokers like Epsilon and Acxiom that can be known for not disclosing their data sources or what cut they take.

The marketing-tech firm makes money by taking a cut of data sales and through larger software as a Service (or SaaS) contracts where marketers pay monthly fees for data.

Narrative in September raised $8.5 million in a Series A funding round led by G20 Ventures and which included Glasswing Ventures and MathCapital, bringing its total funding to $14 million.

Here’s the investor deck that helped startup Narrative raise $8.5 million to help marketers buy data safely


Support for online sellers

Adtech vet Paul Palmieri joined Tradeswell as CEO based on his experience as a VC investor, where he saw dozens of DTC companies whose businesses weren’t scalable.

Tradeswell is a SaaS platform that consolidates brands’ marketing, retail, inventory, logistics, forecasting, lifetime value and financial information. Its pitch is that it gives brands insights so they know what to sell to whom, where, and at what price.

US e-commerce is set to be worth $1 trillion by 2023, according to a recent report by Insider Intelligence’s eMarketer, and Tradeswell says it can help traditional and DTC brands save millions of dollars in outsourced contracts and boost their sales.

Tradeswell recently raised $3.3 million in seed round funding from Signalfire and Construct Capital.

This investor deck helped an entrepreneur raise $3.3 million to build ‘the Bloomberg terminal’ for online sellers


Ad performance tools

BrandTotal

BrandTotal is a marketing analytics company that pitches advertisers on the premise that most digital and social media ads are now “dark,” or visible only to the people they’re targeting.

It joins other businesses that promise greater visibility into digital advertising such as Pathmatics, which measures how much brands spend on Facebook and other platforms.

BrandTotal co-founder Alon Leibovich said the company uses AI to track ads and help advertisers understand their competitors’ strategies.

This pitch has helped BrandTotal win business from big brands like L’Oréal and raise $12 million in a Series B funding round, bringing its total funding to $20 million.

Canada’s INcapital Ventures led the latest round along with Maor Investments, Glilot Capital Partners, Flint Capital, KDC Media Fund, and FJ Labs.

This investor deck helped startup BrandTotal raise $20 million to date to help advertisers like L’Oréal see how their digital ads are working


E-commerce advertising services

Brands are increasingly becoming advertising platforms, giving rise to a cottage industry of adtech companies that help marketers build their own ad businesses.

One such firm is 9-year-old adtech firm Adzerk, which is rebranding as Kevel.

EMarketer reports that e-commerce advertising will be a $17 billion market this year. Retailers like Walgreens, Walmart, and Instacart have led the charge, but Kevel sees an opportunity for other types of brands to build ad businesses of their own.

In December, Kevel raised $11 million in a Series A round led by Fulcrum Equity with Commerce Ventures, MathCapital and Food Retail Ventures also participating.

A digital ad firm just raised $11 million to help brands like United Airlines and Ticketmaster build their own ad businesses


Targeted ad tools

Mathieu Roche, CEO of ID5

Google’s and Apple’s moves to clamp down on privacy and digital-ad targeting have been a boon for startups trying to find workarounds like identity solutions.

One such firm is ID5, a European startup that helps advertisers find audiences to target and make sure people don’t repeatedly see the same ads. It makes money from licensing its ID to adtech companies for a monthly fee that ranges from $5,000 to $30,000, CEO Mathieu Roche said. The company gives away its technology to publishers to grow adoption of the ID.

ID5 closed a $6 million Series A funding round in March from Alliance Entreprendre, Progress Ventures, and 360 Capital Partners. The 4-year-old company has raised a total of $7.5 million.

Read the pitch deck that a startup used to raise $6 million to save targeted advertising


Privacy compliance help

New privacy regulations are springing up around the globe, and publishers and marketers are turning to technology companies to stay on the right side of these laws and avoid huge fines.

One of the companies capitalizing on the increased focus on data privacy is Sourcepoint. Founded by adtech vets Ben Barokas and Brian Kane, the US-based technology company has a platform that lets publishers and advertisers get legal consent from people to use their data.

Sourcepoint recently raised $17 million in additional funding, led by new investor Arrowroot Capital, bringing its total funding to $47.8 million since it launched in 2015.

The pitch deck used to raise $17 million for a startup that helps advertisers and publishers comply with privacy laws


Real-time market research

Former CEO of Publicis agency MRY and Suzy CEO Matt Britton

Agency veteran Matt Britton pitches his consumer intelligence startup Suzy as an always-on digital assistant like Siri or Alexa for marketers. It has a consumer panel that lets marketers conduct surveys and research on subjects like product development and ad effectiveness testing.

He just raised $50 million in Series D after closing a $34 million Series C last year, bringing its total raised to $100 million.

H.I.G. Growth Partners, an affiliate of H.I.G. Capital, led the round, with Rho Capital Partners, Bertelsmann Digital Media Investments, Foundry Group, and Triangle Peak Partners also participating.

See the pitch deck a market research startup that’s trying to rival Qualtrics and SurveyMonkey used to raise $50 million


Livestreaming tools for creators

Livestreaming startup Restream was founded in 2015 to help gaming content creators grow their reach by livestreaming to Twitch and YouTube at the same time.

It’s since expanded to serve musicians, politicians, influencers, publishers, non-profit organizations, and other businesses and says its goal is to democratize broadcasting. Restream said half its 2.5 million users are now non-gamers. Most of its users are nonpaying, but it sells subscriptions from $19 to $299 per month that come with features like the ability to record streams and access to more customer support.

Restream announced in August that it had raised $50 million in fresh funding from investors including Sapphire Ventures and Insight Partners.

Read the 14-slide pitch deck that helped livestreaming startup Restream raise $50 million amid the pandemic


Video streaming subscriptions

CuriosityStream is a 5-year-old streaming service founded by former Discovery Communications founder John Hendricks. It went public in fall 2020 through a reverse merger with Software Acquisition Group, a SPAC led by Jonathan Huberman, who formerly led video adtech firm Ooyala.

CuriosityStream is differentiated from other streaming services in that it focuses on factual content like documentaries and features, with more than 3,100 titles available. It reported 13 million paying subscribers buying monthly and yearly subscriptions ranging from $3 a month to $70 a year.

The deal with Software Acquisition Group gave CuriosityStream $180 million in cash.

The investor deck that CuriosityStream used to secure $180 million to take on rival video streaming services


Reaching online sports fans

overtime founder

Overtime wants to be the next ESPN, but for social media.

It started 2016 by Endeavor vets Dan Porter and Zack Weiner with a focus on high-school sports and athletes and has expanded into areas including esports.

Overtime captures game highlights through people it pays to film events and also creates original programming and events. It distributes content mainly on social platforms like YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok.

Its core business is making money from ads, sponsorships, and merchandise, and projects making $200 million in annual revenue by 2024.

It recently raised $80 million from investors including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, rapper Drake, and Reddit cofounder Alexis Ohanian, The Wall Street Journal recently reported.

Leaked pitch deck shows how sports-media startup Overtime plans to reach $200 million in revenue by 2024

Read the original article on Business Insider

16 pitch decks that startups trying to disrupt media and advertising used to raise millions from investors

Restream founders
Restream cofounders Andrew Surzynskyi and Alex Khuda.

  • Investors are pouring money into advertising, media, and marketing startups.
  • They’re trying to capitalize on changing consumer habits, marketers’ need to see their ads are working, and more.
  • Check out these 16 pitches to see how these startups sold their visions to VCs and other investors.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Investors are pouring money into startups that are trying to disrupt advertising, media, and marketing.

Insider has been tracking these startups that are using tech to capitalize on changing consumer media habits and marketers’ desire to reach new audiences and ensure their ads are working.

Check out these pitch decks that they’ve used to sell their vision and raise millions from PE and VC investors.

They range from tools that measure digital ad performance to platforms for people seeking out online entertainment.


Ad automation

Dan Pantelo started a performance marketing agency in college and pivoted to software after discovering that creative testing was the most important and time-consuming part of making ads.

Today, his marketing technology startup Marpipe claims to help advertisers figure out which ads perform best by automatically testing hundreds of variations.

Marpipe just raised $8 million in Series A for a total of $10 million raised to date.

The key pitch deck slides that helped an ad automation startup raise $10 million


Freelance consulting

Catalant CEO Patrick Petitti
Catalant CEO Patrick Petitti.

Investors are pouring millions into platforms like Catalant Technologies that connect companies to independent advertising and consulting professionals, a need that’s growing as people quit in the pandemic.

Catalant has raised more than $100 million by pitching itself as an alternative to consulting giants like McKinsey.

See the key slides a staffing platform used to raise more than $100 million from investors like Morningside CEO Gerald Chan


Marketing strategy

Ad agency vets Grant McDougall, Liza Nebel, and Matt Gross started BlueOcean in 2019, when they saw an opening to use machine learning to simplify market research and tell marketers how they and their competitors were performing. Now, they count Microsoft, Google, Cisco, Bloomingdale’s, and Diageo as clients.

The software-as-a-service startup just raised $15 million in Series A funding from private equity firm Insight Partners.

Pitch deck reveals how an AI startup that helps brands like Google and Microsoft plan their marketing raised $15 million


Data management tools

Google and Apple’s moves to clamp down on third-party cookies and the rise of online shopping have advertisers clamoring for help managing all their customer data so they can effectively market to them.

One such company is 4-year-old Amperity, which sells software that clients like Starbucks, Patagonia, and Crocs use to manage stats from sales, email, e-commerce, and loyalty card programs.

Amperity has raised $100 million in its Series D from existing investors including Tiger Global Management, Declaration Partners, and Madrona Venture Group, for a total of $187 million.

Here’s the pitch deck that helped a marketing tech startup raise $100 million at a $1 billion valuation to help brands manage their data


Out-of-home advertising platform

Outdoor advertising is coming back after being crushed during the pandemic, and adtech startup OneScreen.ai is hoping to cash in with a platform for brands to search, buy, run and measure their out-of-home ad campaigns.

OneScreen just raised $1.2 million in pre-seed funding in a round led by Florida-based fund TechFarms Capital with other investors including HubSpot cofounders Brian Halligan and Dharmesh Shah, Wayfair’s alumni fund Wayfund, Lola.com CEO Mike Volpe, and BuySellAds.com CEO Todd Garland.

See the pitch deck that Google, Hubspot and Wayfair alums used to raise $1.2 million to build the ‘Amazon of out-of-home advertising’


Consumer data-collection

Jeffrey Nicholson
Jeffrey Nicholson.

Tracer started in 2015 as a unit of Gary Vaynerchuk’s ad agency VaynerMedia that automatically collects and organize data that isn’t personally identifiable. Led by Tracer co-founder and CEO Jeffrey Nicholson, it also offers free consulting services. It started by helping VaynerMedia oversee hundreds of millions in ad buys for clients like Oreo maker Mondelez; today, clients include other ad agencies like Labelium; Condé Nast; and pharma giant Sanofi.

Tracer recently raised $9.9 million in seed funding led by big names like former Walmart and Amazon exec Marc Lore and NBA star Kevin Durant’s firm Thirty Five Ventures.

Read the pitch deck a Gary Vaynerchuk-backed data startup used to raise $10 million from investors like Walmart’s ex-ecommerce CEO


Building lifetime customers

As people do more of their shopping online, marketers are trying to get them to become repeat customers.

Former Paypal and Facebook product and data analytics manager Emad Hasan says his startup Retina helps brands like Dollar Shave Club and Madison Reed acquire and keep customers by building lookalike audiences based on companies’ order history and shopper attributes.

It just raised $8 million in Series A funding from Alpha Intelligence Capital, Vertical Venture Partners, and others.

This investor deck helped a former Facebook product manager raise $8 million to help brands boost customers’ long-term value


Data-buying tools

Nick Jordan founded 5-year-old Narrative to let advertisers buy data without the need for data brokers like Epsilon and Acxiom that can be known for not disclosing their data sources or what cut they take.

The marketing-tech firm makes money by taking a cut of data sales and through larger software as a Service (or SaaS) contracts where marketers pay monthly fees for data.

Narrative in September raised $8.5 million in a Series A funding round led by G20 Ventures and which included Glasswing Ventures and MathCapital, bringing its total funding to $14 million.

Here’s the investor deck that helped startup Narrative raise $8.5 million to help marketers buy data safely


Support for online sellers

Adtech vet Paul Palmieri joined Tradeswell as CEO based on his experience as a VC investor, where he saw dozens of DTC companies whose businesses weren’t scalable.

Tradeswell is a SaaS platform that consolidates brands’ marketing, retail, inventory, logistics, forecasting, lifetime value and financial information. Its pitch is that it gives brands insights so they know what to sell to whom, where, and at what price.

US e-commerce is set to be worth $1 trillion by 2023, according to a recent report by Insider Intelligence’s eMarketer, and Tradeswell says it can help traditional and DTC brands save millions of dollars in outsourced contracts and boost their sales.

Tradeswell recently raised $3.3 million in seed round funding from Signalfire and Construct Capital.

This investor deck helped an entrepreneur raise $3.3 million to build ‘the Bloomberg terminal’ for online sellers


Ad performance tools

BrandTotal

BrandTotal is a marketing analytics company that pitches advertisers on the premise that most digital and social media ads are now “dark,” or visible only to the people they’re targeting.

It joins other businesses that promise greater visibility into digital advertising such as Pathmatics, which measures how much brands spend on Facebook and other platforms.

BrandTotal co-founder Alon Leibovich said the company uses AI to track ads and help advertisers understand their competitors’ strategies.

This pitch has helped BrandTotal win business from big brands like L’Oréal and raise $12 million in a Series B funding round, bringing its total funding to $20 million.

Canada’s INcapital Ventures led the latest round along with Maor Investments, Glilot Capital Partners, Flint Capital, KDC Media Fund, and FJ Labs.

This investor deck helped startup BrandTotal raise $20 million to date to help advertisers like L’Oréal see how their digital ads are working


E-commerce advertising services

Brands are increasingly becoming advertising platforms, giving rise to a cottage industry of adtech companies that help marketers build their own ad businesses.

One such firm is 9-year-old adtech firm Adzerk, which is rebranding as Kevel.

EMarketer reports that e-commerce advertising will be a $17 billion market this year. Retailers like Walgreens, Walmart, and Instacart have led the charge, but Kevel sees an opportunity for other types of brands to build ad businesses of their own.

In December, Kevel raised $11 million in a Series A round led by Fulcrum Equity with Commerce Ventures, MathCapital and Food Retail Ventures also participating.

A digital ad firm just raised $11 million to help brands like United Airlines and Ticketmaster build their own ad businesses


Targeted ad tools

Mathieu Roche, CEO of ID5

Google’s and Apple’s moves to clamp down on privacy and digital-ad targeting have been a boon for startups trying to find workarounds like identity solutions.

One such firm is ID5, a European startup that helps advertisers find audiences to target and make sure people don’t repeatedly see the same ads. It makes money from licensing its ID to adtech companies for a monthly fee that ranges from $5,000 to $30,000, CEO Mathieu Roche said. The company gives away its technology to publishers to grow adoption of the ID.

ID5 closed a $6 million Series A funding round in March from Alliance Entreprendre, Progress Ventures, and 360 Capital Partners. The 4-year-old company has raised a total of $7.5 million.

Read the pitch deck that a startup used to raise $6 million to save targeted advertising


Privacy compliance help

New privacy regulations are springing up around the globe, and publishers and marketers are turning to technology companies to stay on the right side of these laws and avoid huge fines.

One of the companies capitalizing on the increased focus on data privacy is Sourcepoint. Founded by adtech vets Ben Barokas and Brian Kane, the US-based technology company has a platform that lets publishers and advertisers get legal consent from people to use their data.

Sourcepoint recently raised $17 million in additional funding, led by new investor Arrowroot Capital, bringing its total funding to $47.8 million since it launched in 2015.

The pitch deck used to raise $17 million for a startup that helps advertisers and publishers comply with privacy laws


Real-time market research

Former CEO of Publicis agency MRY and Suzy CEO Matt Britton

Agency veteran Matt Britton pitches his consumer intelligence startup Suzy as an always-on digital assistant like Siri or Alexa for marketers. It has a consumer panel that lets marketers conduct surveys and research on subjects like product development and ad effectiveness testing.

He just raised $50 million in Series D after closing a $34 million Series C last year, bringing its total raised to $100 million.

H.I.G. Growth Partners, an affiliate of H.I.G. Capital, led the round, with Rho Capital Partners, Bertelsmann Digital Media Investments, Foundry Group, and Triangle Peak Partners also participating.

See the pitch deck a market research startup that’s trying to rival Qualtrics and SurveyMonkey used to raise $50 million


Livestreaming tools for creators

Livestreaming startup Restream was founded in 2015 to help gaming content creators grow their reach by livestreaming to Twitch and YouTube at the same time.

It’s since expanded to serve musicians, politicians, influencers, publishers, non-profit organizations, and other businesses and says its goal is to democratize broadcasting. Restream said half its 2.5 million users are now non-gamers. Most of its users are nonpaying, but it sells subscriptions from $19 to $299 per month that come with features like the ability to record streams and access to more customer support.

Restream announced in August that it had raised $50 million in fresh funding from investors including Sapphire Ventures and Insight Partners.

Read the 14-slide pitch deck that helped livestreaming startup Restream raise $50 million amid the pandemic


Video streaming subscriptions

CuriosityStream is a 5-year-old streaming service founded by former Discovery Communications founder John Hendricks. It went public in fall 2020 through a reverse merger with Software Acquisition Group, a SPAC led by Jonathan Huberman, who formerly led video adtech firm Ooyala.

CuriosityStream is differentiated from other streaming services in that it focuses on factual content like documentaries and features, with more than 3,100 titles available. It reported 13 million paying subscribers buying monthly and yearly subscriptions ranging from $3 a month to $70 a year.

The deal with Software Acquisition Group gave CuriosityStream $180 million in cash.

The investor deck that CuriosityStream used to secure $180 million to take on rival video streaming services


Reaching online sports fans

overtime founder

Overtime wants to be the next ESPN, but for social media.

It started 2016 by Endeavor vets Dan Porter and Zack Weiner with a focus on high-school sports and athletes and has expanded into areas including esports.

Overtime captures game highlights through people it pays to film events and also creates original programming and events. It distributes content mainly on social platforms like YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok.

Its core business is making money from ads, sponsorships, and merchandise, and projects making $200 million in annual revenue by 2024.

It recently raised $80 million from investors including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, rapper Drake, and Reddit cofounder Alexis Ohanian, The Wall Street Journal recently reported.

Leaked pitch deck shows how sports-media startup Overtime plans to reach $200 million in revenue by 2024

Read the original article on Business Insider

Top marketing and advertising salaries: What you can make at companies including Apple, Google, and Spotify

A Spotify employee
  • Insider analyzed salary data across some of the hottest companies to reveal how much marketers, ad, and PR professionals make.
  • We crunched the numbers for Apple, Google, Microsoft, WPP, and Spotify, and others.
  • US companies report the data in visa applications for foreign workers.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Even as many industries laid off people in the pandemic, companies from Apple to WPP are hiring top ad and marketing talent to fine-tune their image and promote their growing range of products to consumers.

Advertising and related services employed 447,300 workers in August, up 3.2% from a year ago, according to BLS data.

Companies also hire a lot of people from abroad. They’re required to disclose information including salary or salary ranges when they hire people under the H1-B visa program, giving insight into what companies are willing to pay for experts.

Insider rounded up its reporting on what some of the hottest companies pay for marketing and advertising roles by analyzing government data for 2020 and 2021 that companies are required to file for visa-holding employees.

Snap marketing and sales staff pay can reach $110,000 per year

Snap, the company behind Snapchat, has been on a growth tear in recent months. It’s been staffing up as it tries to take on competitors in areas like augmented reality, short-form video, and original shows.

It’s offered staffers in marketing and sales roles like account executive base salaries between $78,000 and $110,000 per year.

Here’s a look at other positions and what they pay across Snap.

Spotify pays marketers $95,000 to $190,000 in base salary

Spotify has become the podcast home to heavy hitters including the Obamas and Joe Rogan, and it’s been steadily hiring as it grows its podcast ambitions.

Spotify offered staffers on US work visas in marketing roles annual base salaries between $94,000 and $190,000. The positions included associate director, corporate development, $185,000; and global agency lead, $157,000.

Read about those and other positions at Spotify.

Marketing roles at Netflix can reach $330,000

Netflix’s resilience despite the pandemic and rising competition has helped make it one of the most desirable places to work in tech.

The streamer has been hiring around the world for a variety of positions, from marketers in Seoul to animation roles in Los Angeles. Unlike other tech companies, it doesn’t pay performance bonuses, but pays high salaries instead.

​​Netflix offered staffers on US work visas in marketing roles annual base salaries ranging from $193,000 and $330,000 per year. They included $193,066 for a manager of brand partnerships and $210,000 for a marketing operations manager.

Here are salaries of marketing and other roles at Netflix.

Creative directors are among the highest paid roles at ad holding companies like WPP

The ad industry went through a major contraction in 2020, with revenue at the major holding companies down by double-digits.

Yet as client spending returns, the biggest agencies are looking for executives to fill top positions like heads of new business, managing directors, and healthcare and ecommerce specialists.

WPP paid healthcare executives $178,000 and top creative leaders up to $880,000, while Dentsu’s Merkle agency awarded paid search managers $90,000 to $135,000, for example.

Read more about pay at WPP, Omnicom, and other ad holding companies.

PR specialists are some of the industry’s top payers

The public relations industry resumed hiring as the industry bounces back from the pandemic. Firms are ramping up recruitment in hot areas like data, crisis management, and healthcare consulting.

Edelman, the biggest PR firm by revenue, paid an associate data scientist $98,363 and VP, technology media specialists $135,000 to $155,000.

Healthcare is in demand, and salaries show it. WPP’s BCW paid an SVP, strategy and development for healthcare $178,000.

Consulting firms with PR specialty divisions offer some of the industry’s top-paying jobs. A VP at Teneo, for example, can make $205,000 to $215,000.

See the full list of PR industry salaries here.

Apple marketers can earn up to $325,000

Technology giants like Facebook, Google, Amazon, Uber, and Airbnb have soared in recent years, thanks in part to their marketing.

Apple is well known for its advertising. It has a dedicated ad agency at Omnicom that handles most of its advertising, and it regularly gets attention for its cinematic campaigns.

Apple also has its own advertising staff, from art directors to design and creative directors.

Here’s a sampling of what Apple, Airbnb, Google, and other tech companies pay marketers.

Intel pays marketing employees nearly $230,000

Intel’s growth has been slowing as it faces growing competition, but its new CEO is trying to turn things around.

It announced plans to invest $20 billion in new factories in Arizona, it’s investing in research and development, and is racing against other tech giants like IBM, Microsoft, and Google to build quantum computers, among other moves.

For all of this, Intel relies on marketers as well as researchers, managers, and software and hardware engineers.

It paid marketing engineers in California $159,536-$229,960 while marketing engineers in Oregon made $110,032-$150,750, for example. Elsewhere, a marketing manager in California can expect a salary of between $124,413-$196,550.

Read more about those and other Intel salaries here.

McAfee paid a marketing VP more than $230,000

Cybersecurity companies are hiring aggressively to fill a talent gap across the industry.

Most of the companies pay six-figure salaries for rank and file tech roles, with managers and executives making up to $350,000 in some cases, according to an Insider review of 24 major players.

Auth0 hired a head of content with a salary of $230,000, for example, while McAfee paid a marketing VP $230,006.

See what those and other cybersecurity companies pay for those and other roles here.

Read the original article on Business Insider

How technology is changing the advertising industry

WPP London.JPG

  • Technology has upended the advertising business.
  • Changes in ad tracking and consumer habits are impacting how advertisers reach people and spurring new competition for ad dollars.
  • Here’s a breakdown of Insider’s coverage of how ad buyers and sellers are impacted.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The advertising industry is going through big changes as technology changes upend consumer habits and where and how marketers reach them.

Apple and Google’s phasing out third-party cookies threatens to upend longstanding ad targeting practices. The acceleration of streaming TV has fueled the chase for TV ad dollars.

The shift to online shopping has attracted new players for digital advertising.

Insider has been tracking these trends at some of the biggest advertising buyers and sellers, including WPP, Omnicom, Google, and Amazon, and rounded up our coverage.


The crackdown on ad tracking is changing advertising

Targeting changes are forcing advertisers to come up with new ways to reach consumers. Google and Apple have sent shockwaves through the ad industry when they announced changes that would put an end to longstanding ad targeting practices in the face of pro-privacy regulation.

Those moves have led marketers, their agencies, and adtech companies like LiveRamp and The Trade Desk scrambling to find workarounds.

Read more:


Marketing meets tech

Mars Inc M&Ms
Employees work at the chocolate maker Mars Chocolate France plant in Haguenau.

CMOs are finding new ways to zap ads at people by building homegrown tools, using targeted ads, or ​​snapping up ad tech and martech companies.

Brands like Anheuser-Busch, Mars, P&G and L’Oréal have ramped up efforts to gather data on consumers as platforms clamp down on ad targeting and e-commerce accelerates.

Read more:


Adtech is hot again

Even as advertisers slashed their spending in the economic downturn, the rise of streaming TV and online shopping has benefitted adtech companies that help connect ad buyers and sellers and solve advertising and marketing problems.

Investors are pouring money into firms like like TVision DoubleVerify that are solving problems in digital advertising. Other firms are going public as Wall Street fell back in love with adtech due to broad macroeconomic changes.

Read more:


Ad agencies are getting disrupted

While the established holding companies scramble to adapt to the digital shift, new ad companies focused on digital specialities and armed with new private-equity funding threaten to take their place.

Read more:


Retailers are seeking a piece of the ad pie

Instacart Shopper Car
Instacart is adding 30-minute delivery.

A new set of companies sees an opportunity in selling advertising include food delivery companies, online retailers, and brick-and-mortar grocers. They’re hoping to replicate the success of Amazon, which claimed 10.3% of the US digital ad market in 2020 and is competing with Google and Facebook for ad budgets.

Read the original article on Business Insider

15 pitch decks that startups looking to disrupt media and advertising used to raise millions

Restream founders
Restream cofounders Andrew Surzynskyi and Alex Khuda.

  • Investors are pouring money into advertising, media, and marketing startups.
  • They’re trying to capitalize on changing consumer habits, marketers’ need to see their ads are working, and more.
  • Check out these 15 pitches to see how these startups sold their visions to VCs and other investors.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Investors are pouring money into startups that are trying to disrupt advertising, media, and marketing.

Insider has been tracking these startups that are using tech to capitalize on changing consumer media habits and marketers’ desire to reach new audiences and ensure their ads are working.

Check out these pitch decks that they’ve used to sell their vision and raise millions from PE and VC investors.

They range from tools that measure digital ad performance to platforms for people seeking out online entertainment.


Freelance consulting

Catalant CEO Patrick Petitti
Catalant CEO Patrick Petitti.

Investors are pouring millions into platforms like Catalant Technologies that connect companies to independent advertising and consulting professionals, a need that’s growing as people quit in the pandemic.

Catalant has raised more than $100 million by pitching itself as an alternative to consulting giants like McKinsey.

See the key slides a staffing platform used to raise more than $100 million from investors like Morningside CEO Gerald Chan


Marketing strategy

Ad agency vets Grant McDougall, Liza Nebel, and Matt Gross started BlueOcean in 2019, when they saw an opening to use machine learning to simplify market research and tell marketers how they and their competitors were performing. Now, they count Microsoft, Google, Cisco, Bloomingdale’s, and Diageo as clients.

The software-as-a-service startup just raised $15 million in Series A funding from private equity firm Insight Partners.

Pitch deck reveals how an AI startup that helps brands like Google and Microsoft plan their marketing raised $15 million


Data management tools

Google and Apple’s moves to clamp down on third-party cookies and the rise of online shopping have advertisers clamoring for help managing all their customer data so they can effectively market to them.

One such company is 4-year-old Amperity, which sells software that clients like Starbucks, Patagonia, and Crocs use to manage stats from sales, email, e-commerce, and loyalty card programs.

Amperity has raised $100 million in its Series D from existing investors including Tiger Global Management, Declaration Partners, and Madrona Venture Group, for a total of $187 million.

Here’s the pitch deck that helped a marketing tech startup raise $100 million at a $1 billion valuation to help brands manage their data


Out-of-home advertising platform

Outdoor advertising is coming back after being crushed during the pandemic, and adtech startup OneScreen.ai is hoping to cash in with a platform for brands to search, buy, run and measure their out-of-home ad campaigns.

OneScreen just raised $1.2 million in pre-seed funding in a round led by Florida-based fund TechFarms Capital with other investors including HubSpot cofounders Brian Halligan and Dharmesh Shah, Wayfair’s alumni fund Wayfund, Lola.com CEO Mike Volpe, and BuySellAds.com CEO Todd Garland.

See the pitch deck that Google, Hubspot and Wayfair alums used to raise $1.2 million to build the ‘Amazon of out-of-home advertising’


Consumer data-collection

Jeffrey Nicholson
Jeffrey Nicholson.

Tracer started in 2015 as a unit of Gary Vaynerchuk’s ad agency VaynerMedia that automatically collects and organize data that isn’t personally identifiable. Led by Tracer co-founder and CEO Jeffrey Nicholson, it also offers free consulting services. It started by helping VaynerMedia oversee hundreds of millions in ad buys for clients like Oreo maker Mondelez; today, clients include other ad agencies like Labelium; Condé Nast; and pharma giant Sanofi.

Tracer recently raised $9.9 million in seed funding led by big names like former Walmart and Amazon exec Marc Lore and NBA star Kevin Durant’s firm Thirty Five Ventures.

Read the pitch deck a Gary Vaynerchuk-backed data startup used to raise $10 million from investors like Walmart’s ex-ecommerce CEO


Building lifetime customers

As people do more of their shopping online, marketers are trying to get them to become repeat customers.

Former Paypal and Facebook product and data analytics manager Emad Hasan says his startup Retina helps brands like Dollar Shave Club and Madison Reed acquire and keep customers by building lookalike audiences based on companies’ order history and shopper attributes.

It just raised $8 million in Series A funding from Alpha Intelligence Capital, Vertical Venture Partners, and others.

This investor deck helped a former Facebook product manager raise $8 million to help brands boost customers’ long-term value


Data-buying tools

Nick Jordan founded 5-year-old Narrative to let advertisers buy data without the need for data brokers like Epsilon and Acxiom that can be known for not disclosing their data sources or what cut they take.

The marketing-tech firm makes money by taking a cut of data sales and through larger software as a Service (or SaaS) contracts where marketers pay monthly fees for data.

Narrative in September raised $8.5 million in a Series A funding round led by G20 Ventures and which included Glasswing Ventures and MathCapital, bringing its total funding to $14 million.

Here’s the investor deck that helped startup Narrative raise $8.5 million to help marketers buy data safely


Support for online sellers

Adtech vet Paul Palmieri joined Tradeswell as CEO based on his experience as a VC investor, where he saw dozens of DTC companies whose businesses weren’t scalable.

Tradeswell is a SaaS platform that consolidates brands’ marketing, retail, inventory, logistics, forecasting, lifetime value and financial information. Its pitch is that it gives brands insights so they know what to sell to whom, where, and at what price.

US e-commerce is set to be worth $1 trillion by 2023, according to a recent report by Insider Intelligence’s eMarketer, and Tradeswell says it can help traditional and DTC brands save millions of dollars in outsourced contracts and boost their sales.

Tradeswell recently raised $3.3 million in seed round funding from Signalfire and Construct Capital.

This investor deck helped an entrepreneur raise $3.3 million to build ‘the Bloomberg terminal’ for online sellers


Ad performance tools

BrandTotal

BrandTotal is a marketing analytics company that pitches advertisers on the premise that most digital and social media ads are now “dark,” or visible only to the people they’re targeting.

It joins other businesses that promise greater visibility into digital advertising such as Pathmatics, which measures how much brands spend on Facebook and other platforms.

BrandTotal co-founder Alon Leibovich said the company uses AI to track ads and help advertisers understand their competitors’ strategies.

This pitch has helped BrandTotal win business from big brands like L’Oréal and raise $12 million in a Series B funding round, bringing its total funding to $20 million.

Canada’s INcapital Ventures led the latest round along with Maor Investments, Glilot Capital Partners, Flint Capital, KDC Media Fund, and FJ Labs.

This investor deck helped startup BrandTotal raise $20 million to date to help advertisers like L’Oréal see how their digital ads are working


E-commerce advertising services

Brands are increasingly becoming advertising platforms, giving rise to a cottage industry of adtech companies that help marketers build their own ad businesses.

One such firm is 9-year-old adtech firm Adzerk, which is rebranding as Kevel.

EMarketer reports that e-commerce advertising will be a $17 billion market this year. Retailers like Walgreens, Walmart, and Instacart have led the charge, but Kevel sees an opportunity for other types of brands to build ad businesses of their own.

In December, Kevel raised $11 million in a Series A round led by Fulcrum Equity with Commerce Ventures, MathCapital and Food Retail Ventures also participating.

A digital ad firm just raised $11 million to help brands like United Airlines and Ticketmaster build their own ad businesses


Targeted ad tools

Mathieu Roche, CEO of ID5

Google’s and Apple’s moves to clamp down on privacy and digital-ad targeting have been a boon for startups trying to find workarounds like identity solutions.

One such firm is ID5, a European startup that helps advertisers find audiences to target and make sure people don’t repeatedly see the same ads. It makes money from licensing its ID to adtech companies for a monthly fee that ranges from $5,000 to $30,000, CEO Mathieu Roche said. The company gives away its technology to publishers to grow adoption of the ID.

ID5 closed a $6 million Series A funding round in March from Alliance Entreprendre, Progress Ventures, and 360 Capital Partners. The 4-year-old company has raised a total of $7.5 million.

Read the pitch deck that a startup used to raise $6 million to save targeted advertising


Privacy compliance help

New privacy regulations are springing up around the globe, and publishers and marketers are turning to technology companies to stay on the right side of these laws and avoid huge fines.

One of the companies capitalizing on the increased focus on data privacy is Sourcepoint. Founded by adtech vets Ben Barokas and Brian Kane, the US-based technology company has a platform that lets publishers and advertisers get legal consent from people to use their data.

Sourcepoint recently raised $17 million in additional funding, led by new investor Arrowroot Capital, bringing its total funding to $47.8 million since it launched in 2015.

The pitch deck used to raise $17 million for a startup that helps advertisers and publishers comply with privacy laws


Real-time market research

Former CEO of Publicis agency MRY and Suzy CEO Matt Britton

Agency veteran Matt Britton pitches his consumer intelligence startup Suzy as an always-on digital assistant like Siri or Alexa for marketers. It has a consumer panel that lets marketers conduct surveys and research on subjects like product development and ad effectiveness testing.

He just raised $50 million in Series D after closing a $34 million Series C last year, bringing its total raised to $100 million.

H.I.G. Growth Partners, an affiliate of H.I.G. Capital, led the round, with Rho Capital Partners, Bertelsmann Digital Media Investments, Foundry Group, and Triangle Peak Partners also participating.

See the pitch deck a market research startup that’s trying to rival Qualtrics and SurveyMonkey used to raise $50 million


Livestreaming tools for creators

Livestreaming startup Restream was founded in 2015 to help gaming content creators grow their reach by livestreaming to Twitch and YouTube at the same time.

It’s since expanded to serve musicians, politicians, influencers, publishers, non-profit organizations, and other businesses and says its goal is to democratize broadcasting. Restream said half its 2.5 million users are now non-gamers. Most of its users are nonpaying, but it sells subscriptions from $19 to $299 per month that come with features like the ability to record streams and access to more customer support.

Restream announced in August that it had raised $50 million in fresh funding from investors including Sapphire Ventures and Insight Partners.

Read the 14-slide pitch deck that helped livestreaming startup Restream raise $50 million amid the pandemic


Video streaming subscriptions

CuriosityStream is a 5-year-old streaming service founded by former Discovery Communications founder John Hendricks. It went public in fall 2020 through a reverse merger with Software Acquisition Group, a SPAC led by Jonathan Huberman, who formerly led video adtech firm Ooyala.

CuriosityStream is differentiated from other streaming services in that it focuses on factual content like documentaries and features, with more than 3,100 titles available. It reported 13 million paying subscribers buying monthly and yearly subscriptions ranging from $3 a month to $70 a year.

The deal with Software Acquisition Group gave CuriosityStream $180 million in cash.

The investor deck that CuriosityStream used to secure $180 million to take on rival video streaming services


Reaching online sports fans

overtime founder

Overtime wants to be the next ESPN, but for social media.

It started 2016 by Endeavor vets Dan Porter and Zack Weiner with a focus on high-school sports and athletes and has expanded into areas including esports.

Overtime captures game highlights through people it pays to film events and also creates original programming and events. It distributes content mainly on social platforms like YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok.

Its core business is making money from ads, sponsorships, and merchandise, and projects making $200 million in annual revenue by 2024.

It recently raised $80 million from investors including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, rapper Drake, and Reddit cofounder Alexis Ohanian, The Wall Street Journal recently reported.

Leaked pitch deck shows how sports-media startup Overtime plans to reach $200 million in revenue by 2024

Read the original article on Business Insider

How technology is upending the advertising business

WPP London.JPG

  • Technology has upended the advertising business.
  • Changes in ad tracking and evolving consumer habits are forcing advertisers to change longstanding ways of zapping ads at people.
  • Here’s a breakdown of Insider’s coverage of how these changes are impacting ad buyers and sellers.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The advertising industry is going through big changes as technology changes upend consumer habits and where and how marketers reach them.

Apple and Google’s phasing out third-party cookies threatens to upend longstanding ad targeting practices. The acceleration of streaming TV has fueled the chase for TV ad dollars.

The shift to online shopping has attracted new players for digital advertising.

Insider has been tracking these trends at some of the biggest advertising buyers and sellers, including WPP, Omnicom, Google, and Amazon, and rounded up our coverage.

The crackdown on ad tracking is changing advertising

Targeting changes are forcing advertisers to come up with new ways to reach consumers. Google and Apple have sent shockwaves through the ad industry when they announced changes that would put an end to longstanding ad targeting practices in the face of pro-privacy regulation.

Those moves have led marketers, their agencies, and adtech companies like LiveRamp and The Trade Desk scrambling to find workarounds.

Read more:

Marketing meets tech

Mars Inc M&Ms
Employees work at the chocolate maker Mars Chocolate France plant in Haguenau.

CMOs are finding new ways to target consumers, building homegrown tools, using targeted ads, or ​​snapping up ad tech and martech companies.

Brands like Anheuser-Busch, Mars, P&G and L’Oréal have ramped up efforts to gather data on consumers as platforms clamp down on ad targeting and e-commerce accelerates.

Read more:

Adtech is hot again

Even as advertisers slashed their spending in the economic downturn, the rise of streaming TV and online shopping has benefitted adtech companies that help connect ad buyers and sellers and solve advertising and marketing problems.

Investors are pouring money into firms like like TVision DoubleVerify that are solving problems in digital advertising. Other firms are going public as Wall Street fell back in love with adtech due to broad macroeconomic changes.

Read more:

New players are disrupting the ad industry

Instacart Shopper Car
Instacart is adding 30-minute delivery.

The established holding companies are scrambling to adapt to the digital shift, while new kinds of specialty ad companies threaten to take their place.

And a new set of companies including delivery services, retailers, and platforms like Instacart, Walmart, and TikTok are gunning for a piece of the ad business.

Investors, startups, and vendors are also trying to cash in on the opportunity.

Read more:

Read the original article on Business Insider

Companies like TikTok and Home Depot are racing to hire talent to build advertising businesses

Krystle Watler at Adcolor
Krystle Watler, head of creative agency partnerships in North America at TikTok

  • Big companies are on a hiring spree for advertising execs.
  • Retailers and platforms like Instacart, Kroger, and TikTok are building ad businesses of their own.
  • Insider identified a large and diverse group of recent hires.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

It’s a good time to work in advertising.

Big companies including retailers, delivery companies and new platforms are on a hiring spree for advertising execs as they build out their own ad-sales businesses. Walmart, Macy’s, Walgreens, and Home Depot are setting up retail media platforms to offset thin retail margins. Amazon is gobbling up adtech expertise to sell a variety of ad formats to brands. And even digital platforms like TikTok and Spotify are vying for social and audio ad dollars.

Insider identified 43 recent advertising hires from companies including Home Depot, Instacart, TikTok, Amazon, Drizly, and Spotify that show how these businesses are making big hiring pushes for advertising execs.

They’re hiring from media companies, tech giants, and ad agencies, which are already in a hiring crunch.

Click here to see the full list of big hires.

Read the original article on Business Insider

How technology is changing advertising

California mall Macy's coronavirus
A shopping mall in San Mateo, California, the United States, May 19, 2021.

  • Technology has upended the advertising business.
  • Changes in ad tracking and evolving consumer habits are ending longstanding ways of ad targeting.
  • Here’s a breakdown of Insider’s coverage of how these changes are impacting ad buyers and sellers.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The advertising industry is going through big changes as technology changes upend consumer habits and where and how marketers reach them.

Apple and Google’s phasing out third-party cookies threatens to upend longstanding ad targeting practices. The acceleration of streaming TV has fueled the chase for TV ad dollars.

The shift to online shopping has attracted new players for digital advertising.

Insider has been tracking these trends at some of the biggest advertising buyers and sellers, including WPP, Omnicom, Google, and Amazon, and rounded up our coverage.

The crackdown on ad tracking is changing advertising

Targeting changes are forcing advertisers to come up with new ways to reach consumers. Google and Apple have sent shockwaves through the ad industry when they announced changes that would put an end to longstanding ad targeting practices in the face of pro-privacy regulation.

Those moves have led marketers, their agencies, and adtech companies like LiveRamp and The Trade Desk scrambling to find workarounds.

Read more:

Marketing meets tech

Mars Inc M&Ms
Employees work at the chocolate maker Mars Chocolate France plant in Haguenau.

CMOs are finding new ways to target consumers, building homegrown tools, using targeted ads, or ​​snapping up ad tech and martech companies.

Brands like Anheuser-Busch, Mars, P&G and L’Oréal have ramped up efforts to gather data on consumers as platforms clamp down on ad targeting and e-commerce accelerates.

Read more:

Adtech is hot again

Even as advertisers slashed their spending in the economic downturn, the rise of streaming TV and online shopping has benefitted adtech companies that help connect ad buyers and sellers and solve advertising and marketing problems.

Investors are pouring money into firms like like TVision DoubleVerify that are solving problems in digital advertising. Other firms are going public as Wall Street fell back in love with adtech due to broad macroeconomic changes.

Read more:

New players are disrupting the ad industry

Instacart Shopper Car
Instacart is adding 30-minute delivery.

The established holding companies are scrambling to adapt to the digital shift, while new kinds of specialty ad companies threaten to take their place.

And a new set of companies including delivery services, retailers, and platforms like Instacart, Walmart, and TikTok are gunning for a piece of the ad business.

Investors, startups, and vendors are also trying to cash in on the opportunity.

Read more:

Read the original article on Business Insider

How much top tech companies pay marketers in the US

tim cook peace sign
Apple CEO Tim Cook.

  • Tech companies like Facebook, Google, Amazon, Uber, and Airbnb have become top destinations for marketers.
  • Insider analyzed public data to get a sense of what the industry is paying.
  • Google paid a product marketer up to $315,000, for example, while Facebook paid about $222,000 for a similar role.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

With their perks and high pay, tech companies have become top destinations for marketers. Google paid a product marketing manager as much as $315,000 in 2021, for example, with Facebook paying about $222,000 for a similar role.

When hiring from abroad, companies have to file paperwork with the US Department of Labor’s Office of Foreign Labor Certification, which releases that salary information every quarter.

Using that information, Insider created a snapshot of how the companies compensate their employees.

This information is derived from 2020-2021 base salary information only. Many firms offer bonuses and equity options to compensate employees.

Our full analysis details the base salaries for roles ranging from associates to SVPs and managing directors.

Read more about how top tech companies pay marketing employees.

Read the original article on Business Insider

14 pitch decks that startups looking to disrupt media and advertising used to raise millions

Restream founders
Restream cofounders Andrew Surzynskyi and Alex Khuda.

  • Investors are pouring money into advertising, media, and marketing startups.
  • They’re trying to capitalize on changing consumer habits and marketers’ need to ensure their ads are working.
  • Check out these pitch decks to see how these startups pitched their visions to VCs and other investors.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Investors are pouring money into startups that are trying to disrupt advertising, media, and marketing.

Insider has been tracking these startups that are using tech to capitalize on changing consumer media habits and marketers’ desire to reach new audiences and ensure their ads are working.

Check out these pitch decks that they’ve used to sell their vision and raise millions from PE and VC investors.

They range from tools that measure digital ad performance to platforms for people seeking out online entertainment.


Data management tools

Google and Apple’s moves to clamp down on third-party cookies and the rise of online shopping have advertisers clamoring for help managing all their customer data so they can effectively market to them.

One such company is 4-year-old Amperity, which sells software that clients like Starbucks, Patagonia, and Crocs use to manage stats from sales, email, e-commerce, and loyalty card programs.

Amperity has raised $100 million in its Series D from existing investors including Tiger Global Management, Declaration Partners, and Madrona Venture Group, for a total of $187 million.

Here’s the pitch deck that helped a marketing tech startup raise $100 million at a $1 billion valuation to help brands manage their data


Out-of-home advertising platform

Outdoor advertising is coming back after being crushed during the pandemic, and adtech startup OneScreen.ai is hoping to cash in with a platform for brands to search, buy, run and measure their out-of-home ad campaigns.

OneScreen just raised $1.2 million in pre-seed funding in a round led by Florida-based fund TechFarms Capital with other investors including HubSpot cofounders Brian Halligan and Dharmesh Shah, Wayfair’s alumni fund Wayfund, Lola.com CEO Mike Volpe, and BuySellAds.com CEO Todd Garland.

See the pitch deck that Google, Hubspot and Wayfair alums used to raise $1.2 million to build the ‘Amazon of out-of-home advertising’


Consumer data-collection

Jeffrey Nicholson
Jeffrey Nicholson.

Tracer started in 2015 as a unit of Gary Vaynerchuk’s ad agency VaynerMedia that automatically collects and organize data that isn’t personally identifiable. Led by Tracer co-founder and CEO Jeffrey Nicholson, it also offers free consulting services. It started by helping VaynerMedia oversee hundreds of millions in ad buys for clients like Oreo maker Mondelez; today, clients include other ad agencies like Labelium; Condé Nast; and pharma giant Sanofi.

Tracer recently raised $9.9 million in seed funding led by big names like former Walmart and Amazon exec Marc Lore and NBA star Kevin Durant’s firm Thirty Five Ventures.

Read the pitch deck a Gary Vaynerchuk-backed data startup used to raise $10 million from investors like Walmart’s ex-ecommerce CEO


Building lifetime customers

As people do more of their shopping online, marketers are trying to get them to become repeat customers.

Former Paypal and Facebook product and data analytics manager Emad Hasan says his startup Retina helps brands like Dollar Shave Club and Madison Reed acquire and keep customers by building lookalike audiences based on companies’ order history and shopper attributes.

It just raised $8 million in Series A funding from Alpha Intelligence Capital, Vertical Venture Partners, and others.

This investor deck helped a former Facebook product manager raise $8 million to help brands boost customers’ long-term value


Data-buying tools

Nick Jordan founded 5-year-old Narrative to let advertisers buy data without the need for data brokers like Epsilon and Acxiom that can be known for not disclosing their data sources or what cut they take.

The marketing-tech firm makes money by taking a cut of data sales and through larger software as a Service (or SaaS) contracts where marketers pay monthly fees for data.

Narrative in September raised $8.5 million in a Series A funding round led by G20 Ventures and which included Glasswing Ventures and MathCapital, bringing its total funding to $14 million.

Here’s the investor deck that helped startup Narrative raise $8.5 million to help marketers buy data safely


Support for online sellers

Adtech vet Paul Palmieri joined Tradeswell as CEO based on his experience as a VC investor, where he saw dozens of DTC companies whose businesses weren’t scalable.

Tradeswell is a SaaS platform that consolidates brands’ marketing, retail, inventory, logistics, forecasting, lifetime value and financial information. Its pitch is that it gives brands insights so they know what to sell to whom, where, and at what price.

US e-commerce is set to be worth $1 trillion by 2023, according to a recent report by Insider Intelligence’s eMarketer, and Tradeswell says it can help traditional and DTC brands save millions of dollars in outsourced contracts and boost their sales.

Tradeswell recently raised $3.3 million in seed round funding from Signalfire and Construct Capital.

This investor deck helped an entrepreneur raise $3.3 million to build ‘the Bloomberg terminal’ for online sellers


Ad performance tools

BrandTotal

BrandTotal is a marketing analytics company that pitches advertisers on the premise that most digital and social media ads are now “dark,” or visible only to the people they’re targeting.

It joins other businesses that promise greater visibility into digital advertising such as Pathmatics, which measures how much brands spend on Facebook and other platforms.

BrandTotal co-founder Alon Leibovich said the company uses AI to track ads and help advertisers understand their competitors’ strategies.

This pitch has helped BrandTotal win business from big brands like L’Oréal and raise $12 million in a Series B funding round, bringing its total funding to $20 million.

Canada’s INcapital Ventures led the latest round along with Maor Investments, Glilot Capital Partners, Flint Capital, KDC Media Fund, and FJ Labs.

This investor deck helped startup BrandTotal raise $20 million to date to help advertisers like L’Oréal see how their digital ads are working


E-commerce advertising services

Brands are increasingly becoming advertising platforms, giving rise to a cottage industry of adtech companies that help marketers build their own ad businesses.

One such firm is 9-year-old adtech firm Adzerk, which is rebranding as Kevel.

EMarketer reports that e-commerce advertising will be a $17 billion market this year. Retailers like Walgreens, Walmart, and Instacart have led the charge, but Kevel sees an opportunity for other types of brands to build ad businesses of their own.

In December, Kevel raised $11 million in a Series A round led by Fulcrum Equity with Commerce Ventures, MathCapital and Food Retail Ventures also participating.

A digital ad firm just raised $11 million to help brands like United Airlines and Ticketmaster build their own ad businesses


Targeted ad tools

Mathieu Roche, CEO of ID5

Google’s and Apple’s moves to clamp down on privacy and digital-ad targeting have been a boon for startups trying to find workarounds like identity solutions.

One such firm is ID5, a European startup that helps advertisers find audiences to target and make sure people don’t repeatedly see the same ads. It makes money from licensing its ID to adtech companies for a monthly fee that ranges from $5,000 to $30,000, CEO Mathieu Roche said. The company gives away its technology to publishers to grow adoption of the ID.

ID5 closed a $6 million Series A funding round in March from Alliance Entreprendre, Progress Ventures, and 360 Capital Partners. The 4-year-old company has raised a total of $7.5 million.

Read the pitch deck that a startup used to raise $6 million to save targeted advertising


Privacy compliance help

New privacy regulations are springing up around the globe, and publishers and marketers are turning to technology companies to stay on the right side of these laws and avoid huge fines.

One of the companies capitalizing on the increased focus on data privacy is Sourcepoint. Founded by adtech vets Ben Barokas and Brian Kane, the US-based technology company has a platform that lets publishers and advertisers get legal consent from people to use their data.

Sourcepoint recently raised $17 million in additional funding, led by new investor Arrowroot Capital, bringing its total funding to $47.8 million since it launched in 2015.

The pitch deck used to raise $17 million for a startup that helps advertisers and publishers comply with privacy laws


Real-time market research

Former CEO of Publicis agency MRY and Suzy CEO Matt Britton

Agency veteran Matt Britton pitches his consumer intelligence startup Suzy as an always-on digital assistant like Siri or Alexa for marketers. It has a panel of 1 million US consumers that lets marketers conduct surveys and research on subjects like product development and ad effectiveness testing.

He closed a $34 million Series C round last year, bringing its total raised to $46 million.

Rho Ventures, Bertelsmann Digital Media Investments, Triangle Peak Partners, and Foundry Group participated in the Series C round in March ($18 million) and September ($16 million).

An agency vet used this pitch deck to sell what he called the ‘Siri for marketers,’ landing clients including Johnson & Johnson and Chipotle


Livestreaming tools for creators

Livestreaming startup Restream was founded in 2015 to help gaming content creators grow their reach by livestreaming to Twitch and YouTube at the same time.

It’s since expanded to serve musicians, politicians, influencers, publishers, non-profit organizations, and other businesses and says its goal is to democratize broadcasting. Restream said half its 2.5 million users are now non-gamers. Most of its users are nonpaying, but it sells subscriptions from $19 to $299 per month that come with features like the ability to record streams and access to more customer support.

Restream announced in August that it had raised $50 million in fresh funding from investors including Sapphire Ventures and Insight Partners.

Read the 14-slide pitch deck that helped livestreaming startup Restream raise $50 million amid the pandemic


Video streaming subscriptions

CuriosityStream is a 5-year-old streaming service founded by former Discovery Communications founder John Hendricks. It went public in fall 2020 through a reverse merger with Software Acquisition Group, a SPAC led by Jonathan Huberman, who formerly led video adtech firm Ooyala.

CuriosityStream is differentiated from other streaming services in that it focuses on factual content like documentaries and features, with more than 3,100 titles available. It reported 13 million paying subscribers buying monthly and yearly subscriptions ranging from $3 a month to $70 a year.

The deal with Software Acquisition Group gave CuriosityStream $180 million in cash.

The investor deck that CuriosityStream used to secure $180 million to take on rival video streaming services


Reaching online sports fans

overtime founder

Overtime wants to be the next ESPN, but for social media.

It started 2016 by Endeavor vets Dan Porter and Zack Weiner with a focus on high-school sports and athletes and has expanded into areas including esports.

Overtime captures game highlights through people it pays to film events and also creates original programming and events. It distributes content mainly on social platforms like YouTube, Instagram, and TikTok.

Its core business is making money from ads, sponsorships, and merchandise, and projects making $200 million in annual revenue by 2024.

It recently raised $80 million from investors including Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, rapper Drake, and Reddit cofounder Alexis Ohanian, The Wall Street Journal recently reported.

Leaked pitch deck shows how sports-media startup Overtime plans to reach $200 million in revenue by 2024

Read the original article on Business Insider