A 3D-printed concrete tiny home is now on Airbnb – see what it’s like to stay inside the $130 per-night stay

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

  • Take a tour of the Fibonacci House, a 3D-printed concrete tiny home that’s now available on Airbnb.
  • The home was designed, created, and sold by a Dutch company, Twente Additive Manufacturing.
  • The Fibonacci House is Canada’s first 3D-printed home and Airbnb’s first 3D printed concrete tiny home.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
Vacationers have been flocking to Airbnb’s “unique stays,” and searches for these unconventional rentals have jumped 94% in 2021 compared to the same time in 2019, according to Airbnb.

the exterior side view of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

Now, a new one-of-a-kind unique stay is available for summertime vacationers to rent: the Fibonacci House …

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

… Canada’s first 3D-printed home and Airbnb’s first 3D-printed concrete tiny home, according to a press release from Twente Additive Manufacturing (TAM).

a wall of the Fibonacci House under construction
The Fibonacci House.

Twente Additive Manufacturing is a Dutch construction technology group that specializes in, of course, 3D-printed concrete homes.

The Fibonacci House under on-site construction
The Fibonacci House.

Like other 3D-printed concrete homes, the sound and weatherproof Fibonacci House has distinctly curved walls.

the Fibonacci House under construction with only its walls up
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Insider

If the home’s name sounds familiar, that’s because its design and name pay homage to the Fibonacci Sequence – or the golden ratio – hence its curved appearance.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House with a view of its surroundings
The Fibonacci House.

The home was designed to use “the least number of straight lines in the design as possible,” according to the press release.

the Fibonacci House under construction with no roof yet
The Fibonacci House.

The Fibonacci House was printed over 11 days in 20 parts using a 3D concrete printer.

the Fibonacci House being printed
The Fibonacci House.

These components were first printed off-site before being assembled at its current woodsy Canadian location, Lynne Myers reported for Designboom.

the Fibonacci House being printed
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Designboom

The Airbnb now sits in the Kootenay Lake Village at the waterfront Procter Point community.

the Fibonacci House in a wooded area
The Fibonacci House.

Besides 3D printing, the spiral concrete home also capitalizes on another big real estate trend: tiny homes.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

In this case, tiny means 376.7 square feet.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

This space – which follows a curved, spiraling floor plan – fits a living room, kitchen, bathroom, patio, and sleeping loft.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

The bathroom is located in the middle of the curved floor plan, and its shower tops off the center of the spiral.

the Fibonacci House's shower
The Fibonacci House.

The room also has a toilet, sink, and enough storage to accommodate items like towels, according to images on the Airbnb listing.

the Fibonacci House's bathroom
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

Now, moving on to the bedroom. The sleeping loft can be accessed using the ladder, according to the Airbnb listing.

the Fibonacci House's kitchen and ladder
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

If you’ve never slept in a loft before, don’t be too concerned about the height.

the Fibonacci House under construction with no roof yet
The Fibonacci House.

The side of the bed closest to the ledge is guarded by a mesh net.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

In total, this area can sleep two adults and two children.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House with a view of its surroundings
The Fibonacci House.

Moving along, the window-lined kitchen and living room are at the base of the ladder.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

Taking a closer look, the kitchen has amenities like a dual induction cooktop, a coffee maker, and cabinets.

the Fibonacci House's kitchen
The Fibonacci House.

Now, let’s head outside to the last part of this tour, the covered patio.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

Don’t want to cook in the kitchen? You’re in luck. The outdoor space has a barbecue and view of a park and the nearby Kootenay Lake.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

Almost all of the home’s elements that aren’t based in concrete are made up of sustainably sourced wood from a nearby community forest.

the bathroom of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

The revenue from the Airbnb listing will be donated to World Housing, a home building charity that’s currently looking to construct a community of affordable 3D printed homes for single mothers in Canada.

The exterior of the Fibonacci House with a tree
The Fibonacci House.

The community – currently called “Sakura Place” – will have five three-bedroom homes that will form the appearance of a flower.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

Like other companies that specialize in a 3D printing construction method, World Housing believes 3D concrete printing can address two aspects of the housing crisis: the labor and housing shortage.

a close up of the Fibonacci Houses windows
The Fibonacci House.

Similarly, TAM believes that home construction needs to pivot to decreasing building material use and energy consumption while “rewiring … how people think about the process of designing buildings,” according to the press release.

the Fibonacci House under construction with only its walls up
The Fibonacci House.

“In addition to affordable homes, the market increasingly demands innovative housing concepts,” Yasin Torunoglu, the housing and spatial development alderman at the municipality of Eindhoven, said in a press release regarding another 3D printed concrete home, this time in the Netherlands.

the Fibonacci House under construction with a crane lifting part of the home
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Insider

“With the 3D printed home, we’re now setting the tone for the future: the rapid realization of affordable homes with control over the shape of your own house,” Torunoglu continued.

the Fibonacci House under construction
The Fibonacci House.

A night’s stay at the Fibonacci House ranges from around $127 to $132 per night – not including the cleaning or service fee – depending on the days booked.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

But if you’re currently planning a last-minute trip, don’t go running to the Fibonacci House listing.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

The Fibonacci House is already fully booked for the reminder of July and almost half of August.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

Read the original article on Business Insider

Habitat for Humanity is creating a 3D printed home for a family of 3 in Virginia – see inside

A rendering of the interior of the home's dining room and kitchen
A rendering of the 3D printed home’s interior

  • Habitat for Humanity has partnered with Alquist, a 3D-printing home construction company.
  • Together, the nonprofit and Alquist will construct a 3D-printed home in Williamsburg, Virginia.
  • The home will later be sold to a family of three.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Habitat for Humanity has partnered with Alquist, a 3D-printing home construction company, to create a 3D-printed home in Williamsburg, Virginia in an attempt to address the US housing crisis.

This isn’t Habitat for Humanity’s first 3D-printing rodeo. In mid-June, the nonprofit announced it would be using Germany-based Peri’s COBOD “build on-demand printer” – or the BOD2 – to 3D print a home in Tempe, Arizona.

“When we consider the housing issues facing Arizona, the need for affordable homeownership solutions becomes clear,” Jason Barlow, president and CEO of Habitat Central Arizona, said in the press release at the time. “If we can deliver decent, affordable, more energy-efficient homes at less cost, in less time and with less waste, we think that could be a real game-changer.”

Now, Habitat for Humanity Peninsula and Greater Williamsburg is bringing this 3D printing mission to the East Coast with the help of Alquist, which will begin constructing and printing the home’s walls later this month. Similar to Peri, Alquist is partners with COBOD, according to Alquist’s website.

a rendering of the COBOD 3D printer
The printer.

Like the Tempe, Arizona home, the goal of this upcoming Williamsburg, Virginia home is to address the housing crisis, specifically skyrocketing home prices and slow construction times.

Now, let’s take a peek around the upcoming 3D printed home

A rendering of the exterior of the brown and white home with trees and bushes around it
A rendering of the 3D printed home’s exterior.

Like other 3D printing home companies, Alquist’s printing system uses concrete, creating a time and money-saving method of construction, according to the press release. The concrete also insulates the home while making it tornado and hurricane resistant.

When it’s complete, the 3D-printed home will stand at 1,200 square feet with its three bedrooms and two bathrooms. It’ll also be EarthCraft certified, which means the unit will be both green and energy efficient.

A rendering of the interior of the home's dining and living room, kitchen
A rendering of the 3D printed home’s interior

Like other Habitat for Humanity homes, the project will be built by volunteers, sponsors, and people who want to purchase the final unit.

In this case, a person named April and her family of three will purchase this 3D-printed home. From there, her zero-interest mortgage, taxes, and insurance will be about 30% of her income, which is already 80% lower than her community’s median income level, according to the press release.

“We’ve seen firsthand how Habitat for Humanity’s housing program provides an enhanced quality of life for families,” Janet Green, Habitat for Humanity Peninsula and Greater Williamsburg’s CEO, said in the press release. “We are so excited to be constructing a 3D home for this family and help them achieve their dream of homeownership.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

Habitat for Humanity is building a 3D-printed home in Arizona to help solve the affordable housing crisis. See how it’s being constructed.

The home being 3D printed
The site of the 3D-printed home.

  • Habitat for Humanity in Central Arizona is building a 3D-printed home in Tempe, Arizona.
  • The home will have three bedrooms and two bathrooms.
  • Prefabricated and 3D-printed homes are increasingly being seen as solutions to our housing crisis.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
A massive housing crisis and shortage has been tearing across the US.

A portion of the home with plumbing
The site of the 3D-printed home.

In an effort to help alleviate this issue, Habitat for Humanity in Central Arizona is now building a 3D-printed home in Tempe, Arizona …

Constructing the 3D-printed home
The site of the 3D-printed home.

Source: Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona

… designed in partnership with luxury architecture firm Candelaria Design.

Documents from the City of Tempe
Documents from the City of Tempe for the 3D-printed home.

According to Habitat for Humanity, 3D printing could be an economical way to address said crisis.

A person constructing the 3D-printed home
A person and machinery on the site of the 3D-printed home.

“When we consider the housing issues facing Arizona, the need for affordable homeownership solutions becomes clear,” Jason Barlow, president and CEO of Habitat Central Arizona, said in the press release.

People and machinery on the 3D-printed home's site
People and machinery on the site of the 3D-printed home.

Source: Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona

“If we can deliver decent, affordable, more energy-efficient homes at less cost, in less time and with less waste, we think that could be a real game-changer,” Barlow continued.

The home being 3D printed
The site of the 3D-printed home.

Homebuilding methods like 3D printing or prefabrication are increasingly being considered as feasible alternatives to “traditional” construction.

The home being printed
The site of the 3D-printed home.

Using a 3D printer to create homes is often seen as a more efficient and sustainable alternative to traditional construction methods.

People and machinery on the 3D-printed home's site
People and machinery on the site of the 3D-printed home.

“In addition to affordable homes, the market increasingly demands innovative housing concepts,” Yasin Torunoglu, the housing and spatial development alderman at the municipality of Eindhoven, said in regards to a different 3D-printed home in the Netherlands.

The home being 3D printed
The site of the 3D-printed home.

Source: Insider

The home in Tempe is being built using both a 3D printer and “traditional” construction techniques.

The site of the 3D-printed home
The site of the 3D-printed home.

Between 70 to 80% of the home will be printed, including the walls.

The home being 3D printed
The site of the 3D-printed home.

The team is relying on a printer from Germany-based Peri: the “build on-demand printer,” or the BOD2.

The 3D-printer
Machinery on the site of the 3D-printed home.

Peri is a European formwork and scaffolding maker, and its 3D printer has also been used to print another home and a three-floor apartment building in Germany.

The home being printed
The site of the 3D-printed home.

Source: Insider

The printer was sent to the US in March and moved to Arizona in April. It officially began its printing work in Tempe one month later.

A person and machinery on the 3D-printed home's site
A person and machinery on the site of the 3D-printed home.

Peri describes the BOD2 as a “gantry printer.”

The home being printed
The site of the 3D-printed home.

The printing mechanism can move left, right, forward, backward, up, and down …

The home being 3D printed
The site of the 3D-printed home.

… which allows the printer head to move anywhere within the construction space.

The home being 3D printed
The site of the 3D-printed home.

The printer can also be used while workers are completing other on-site construction projects, creating a human and machine team that works in harmony.

People on the 3D-printed home's site
People and machinery on the site of the 3D-printed home.

The home is still in progress, but Habitat for Humanity projects the project will be ready in August or September.

A portion of the home with wiring
The site of the 3D-printed home.

By October, the home could be occupied by “income-qualified homeowners,” according to the team.

Renderings of the 3D-printed home
The site of the 3D-printed home.

Source: Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona

In total, the home will sit at 2,433 square feet, but its living space will fall a bit shorter at 1,738 square feet.

The home being 3D printed with machinery and a person
The site of the 3D-printed home.

All of this space will then accommodate three bedrooms and two bathrooms.

overhead view of the site of the 3D-printed home.
The site of the 3D-printed home.

“Beyond our city borders, this project can serve as a model for other communities as we all work to meet the critical needs of families who truly are the faces of this growing housing affordability crisis,” Corey Woods, the mayor of Tempe, said in the press release.

The home being printed
The site of the 3D-printed home.

Source: Habitat for Humanity Central Arizona

Read the original article on Business Insider

A couple just moved into a 3D-printed concrete home for about $1,400 a month- see what it’s like to live in

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

  • A couple recently moved into a 1,012-square-foot 3D-printed concrete home in the Netherlands.
  • It’s one of five homes that are part of the world’s first 3D-printed concrete “commercial housing project.”
  • Concrete 3D printed homes could help alleviate the housing crisis and shortage, according to the home’s makers.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
On April 30, a Dutch couple began calling a 3D printed concrete house their home.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

The home is based in Eindhoven in the Netherlands.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

It’s the first of five 3D-printed homes under “Project Milestone,” a collaboration between the Eindhoven University of Technology, the municipality, industry experts, architects, and several private companies.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Project Milestone serves as the world’s first 3D-printed concrete “commercial housing project,” according to its maker.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Source: 3D Printed House

The five homes are being built one at a time, which allows its makers to apply learnings from previous builds into each upcoming home. Each house will be more complex than its predecessors.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

The housing crisis has been escalating in recent years, especially in the US.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Source: Insider

The project’s teams hope to make 3D concrete printing a sustainable home building option to help alleviate this growing housing crisis, according to its makers.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Source: 3D Printed House

The process of creating a 3D printed home is often seen as more sustainable and faster than traditional homebuilding …

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Source: Insider

… especially because the precise printer used in Project Milestone uses less concrete than traditional construction methods.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Aesthetics-wise, the printer can also create a more creative and non-traditional home, as seen with this new boulder-shaped house.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

“In addition to affordable homes, the market increasingly demands innovative housing concepts,” Yasin Torunoglu, the housing and spatial development alderman at the municipality of Eindhoven, said in a press release.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Source: 3D Printed House

“With the 3D-printed home, we’re now setting the tone for the future: the rapid realization of affordable homes with control over the shape of your own house,” Torunoglu continued.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

As of now, 3D-printed homes aren’t more affordable than “traditional” homes despite reduced labor costs. However, it’s a goal the project is working towards.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Source: 3D Printed House

This new home is made up of 24 concrete pieces that were printed at a printing plant.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

The pieces were then trucked to the home’s final site and assembled on the house’s foundation.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

A roof and frames were later added.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

The homes are durable despite this multi-piece process: the units are meant to serve as functioning homes for a few decades.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

The 3D-printed bungalow is now owned by Vesteda, a real estate investor. It’ll be rented out to private occupants via six-month contracts at around $1,400 a month.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Source: 3D Printed House

The home is currently being occupied by two retirees from Amsterdam, The Guardian reported.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Source: The Guardian

“It has the feel of a bunker – it feels safe,” Harrie Dekkers, one of the occupants, told The Guardian.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Source: The Guardian

Now, let’s take a look at the home.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

The almost 1,012-square-foot home has a living room, kitchen, and two bedrooms.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Its unique “large boulder-shaped” appearance was designed to fit into its surroundings and show off the 3D printer’s ability to create unique free-formed buildings.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Unlike other 3D-printed homes, this unit has a distinctive appearance with its curved walls and spaces.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Besides its eccentric shape, the interior of the concrete home doesn’t look any different than that of a traditional home.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

The front door can be locked and unlocked using a digital key.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Source: The Guardian

It’s also well insulated and comes with connections to a heating system, similar to any modern home.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

The home is also full of large windows for more natural light.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

The living room has an open concept …

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

… which means the kitchen space opens out into the conjoined dining and living room.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

There’s even room for a home office inside one of the two bedrooms.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

And of course, there’s a bathroom with necessities like sinks and a shower.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

The first unit stands at one story tall. But unlike this unit, future homes in Project Milestone will be multi-leveled.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
Inside a 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

The fifth home in the project, which will be two stories tall, will be printed on-site.

3d printed concrete home with project milestone
A 3D-printed concrete home with Project Milestone.

Source: 3D Printed House

Read the original article on Business Insider