Mike Lindell is offering $5 million to anyone who can disprove his alleged voter-fraud evidence – if they show up to his cyber symposium conference

Mike Lindell
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell waits outside the West Wing of the White House on January 15, 2021 in Washington, DC.

  • Mike Lindell continues to spread baseless claims that Donald Trump won the 2020 presidential election.
  • The MyPillow CEO is offering a $5 million bounty to anyone who can prove he’s wrong.
  • The catch: you have to attend his upcoming cyber symposium conference in South Dakota.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, a staunch ally of former President Donald Trump and leading promoter of voter fraud conspiracy theories, said he’d give $5 million to anyone who can disprove data that he claims shows election interference.

But there’s a catch. To be eligible, you have to attend his upcoming cyber symposium conference, which is taking place in South Dakota between August 10 and 12.

And the event isn’t open to the public, according to an advert for the event posted on Lindell’s website Frank. Invitees include current politicians, cyber experts, and the media, though it will also be streamed for 72 hours on Frank.

Lindell said he wants the symposium to be the most-watched live event in history, and is aiming for 1 billion people to watch it via his website, Salon’s Zachary Petrizzo reported. He has reserved 800 rooms for the event, but few officials have said they will attend.

There is nothing to suggest Lindell’s event will draw anywhere close to those numbers. For context, the most-watched Super Bowl ever drew in around 114 million viewers, and the first 2020 presidential debate had a total of 73 million viewers.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

At the event, “Mike will reveal the cyber data and the packet captures from the November 2020 election,” the advert says. “A $5,000,000 prize will be offered to any attendee who can prove that this cyber data is not valid data from the November 2020 election.”

Lindell told Steve Bannon on Monday that he has 37 terabytes of information related to voter fraud, Salon reported.

Kevin Skoglund, president and chief technologist of Citizens for Better Elections, told The Dispatch that Lindell’s data theory is “technically incoherent and wrong in several ways.” According to Skoglund, Lindell claims that his team of anonymous experts collected internet traffic from foreign computers that infiltrated US voting systems.

“An extraordinary claim needs extraordinary evidence,” Skoglund said to The Dispatch. “And they provide little evidence at all.”

Lindell, who said in April that he still spoke to Trump around once a month, has repeatedly supported the former president’s debunked claims challenging the integrity of the 2020 election.

This has led to Lindell being blocked from Twitter and sued by vote-machine company Dominion for $1.3 billion for claiming that it “switched” votes from Trump to Biden. MyPillow’s products have also been pulled by retailers and Lindell said he’d received death threats, too.

Discussing the media, Lindell said: “I’ve invited them all to the symposium. Why don’t you prove it there so then you can win $5 million?”

This isn’t the first time Lindell has held an event to spout his voter-fraud theories.

He also held a so-called “Frank Rally” at the Corn Palace in South Dakota in May to celebrate the launch of the site, which features videos and articles, many by right-wing conspiracy theorists, that largely focus on voter fraud.

The venue for the Frank Rally could fit around 3,000 attendees – but pictures circulating on Twitter showed that it was only half full.

The rally featured talks from Ben Carson, Trump’s secretary of housing and urban development, and conservative podcaster Eric Metaxas, as well as Lindell himself, who spread voter-fraud theories including an inflated estimate of Trump’s vote total in the 2020 presidential election.

Attendees received a free copy of both Lindell’s autobiography and his self-made voter-fraud film “Absolute Proof.”

Lindell also spoke at the ReAwaken America tour last week, where he claimed that Trump received 80 million votes in the 2020 election and Biden 68 million, though he failed to provide any evidence to back up his claims.

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Toyota said it would stop donating to Republicans who voted against Biden’s certification, having given tens of thousands of dollars since the Capitol riots

Donald Trump
Many top US companies scrambled to cut ties with the 147 GOP lawmakers who voted against the election results following the January 6 Capitol siege.

  • Toyota said it would stop donating to Republicans who had objected to Joe Biden’s certification.
  • The automaker’s PAC had given tens of thousands of dollars to these lawmakers since January.
  • In an ad this week, the Lincoln Project targeted Toyota for donating to the objectors.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Toyota said Thursday it would stop donating to Republicans who objected to Joe Biden’s certification as president, after the automaker came under fire from watchdogs and activists for giving tens of thousands of dollars to these lawmakers.

The company was the target of an advert from anti-Donald Trump campaign group the Lincoln Project on Thursday, which said that the automaker had given “more money than any company to the seditious politicians who voted to overturn the 2020 election result.”

The Lincoln Project shared a statement from Toyota after the ad’s publication, which said that its PAC’s decision to donate to the objectors had “troubled some stakeholders.”

“At this time, we have decided to stop contributing to those Members of Congress who contested the certification of certain states in the 2020 election,” its statement read.

The left-leaning watchdog Citizens for Ethics said in July that Toyota’s PAC had donated $56,000 total to 38 GOP objectors since January, making it the biggest donor to the individual objectors and their leadership PACs – while Popular Information said that the company’s PAC has donated $62,000 to 40 lawmakers.

Read more: Inside the Trump International Hotel DC when the Trump Organization indictments came down

Federal Election Commission filings show that, among others, Toyota donated $5,000 to Michigan Rep. Jack Bergman and $3,500 to Arizona Rep. David Schweikert.

“Toyota’s number one at finding ways to financially reward the very party that took our nation to the brink on January 6,” the narrator said in the Lincoln Project’s ad.

“If [Toyota’s executives] don’t reconsider where they send their money, Americans will reconsider where we send ours,” they added. Comcast refused to air the ad, the Lincoln Project said.

After a mob of Trump supporters stormed the US Capitol on January 6 to try and prevent Congress from certifying Biden’s win, many top US companies scrambled to cut ties with the 147 GOP lawmakers who voted against the results.

Dozens of companies, including Walmart, Amazon, Morgan Stanley, and AT&T, said they would stop donating to these specific lawmakers, and Hallmark even asked two senators to return its donations.

Other companies, including Microsoft, Deloitte, and Goldman Sachs, said they would instead pause all political donations to both Republicans and Democrats..

The vast majority of corporations who pledged to stop funding these GOP lawmakers have stayed true to their word. Some companies who made vaguer promises about assessing PAC criteria have restarted donations, while others gave money instead to various Republican committees that, in turn, fund these lawmakers.

Toyota did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment. A Toyota spokesperson told Insider in May that the company “supports candidates based on their position on issues that are important to the auto industry and the company.”

“We do not believe it is appropriate to judge members of Congress solely based on their votes on the electoral certification,” the spokesperson said at the time. “Based on our thorough review, we decided against giving to some members who, through their statements and actions, undermine the legitimacy of our elections and institutions.” The spokesperson did not say who those members were.

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Some Mike Lindell fans reportedly stood in line for 7 hours to watch his rally at the Corn Palace – but when the event started, the venue was half-empty

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell and the Corn Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota.
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell and the Corn Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota.

  • Mike Lindell held a rally in South Dakota Monday to speak about his voter-fraud website Frank.
  • The Dickinson Press reported that guests stood in line for hours – but the venue was only half-full.
  • Ben Carson and Eric Metaxas spoke at the event, while Joe Piscopo performed a music set.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Supporters of MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell stood in line for hours to attend his rally in South Dakota on Monday – but the Corn Palace venue was only half-full for the event.

Lindell held the rally to launch “Frank,” the website he billed as a social-media site, but is so far a one-way platform for him to spread baseless allegations of voter fraud.

Photos shared on Twitter show lines snaking around the Corn Palace in Mitchell. The Dickinson Press reported that some people stood in line for up to seven hours for the free event, which let people in on a first-come, first-served basis.

Some guests said they came from neighboring states, including Minnesota and Nebraska, while others came from as far away as Texas, the publication reported.

Corn Palace Director Doug Greenway told Insider’s Kevin Shalvey that he had fielded calls from dozens of people interested in attending the event.

The venue fits about 3,000 people, and photos on Twitter suggest that it was around half full for the event.

Lindell, a close ally of former President Donald Trump, has repeatedly pushed disproven voter-fraud conspiracy theories about the presidential election, leading to voting-machine company Dominion suing him for $1.3 billion.

Some attendees at Monday’s event brought along Trump merchandise, including hats and flags. Salon.com’s Zachary Petrizzo reported that a group of far-right Proud Boy members attended, citing a source at the event.

The event featured talks from Ben Carson, Trump’s secretary of housing and urban development, who joined on video call, and conservative podcaster Eric Metaxas. Comedian Joe Piscopo of “Saturday Night Live” fame performed a music set, which included the national anthem.

This was followed by a 90-minute speech from Lindell, who spread voter-fraud theories, including claims that Trump got 80 million votes in the 2020 presidential election, per Newsweek. The Federal Election Commission says that Trump got just over 72 million votes.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

Attendees received a free copy of both Lindell’s autobiography and his self-made film “Absolute Proof,” which alleges fraud in the 2020 election.

Mitchell has a population of around 15,000, but Lindell said he chose the location partially because of the South Dakota GOP governor’s resistance to COVID-19 lockdown measures.

His Corn Palace rally was sandwiched between a Dakota Wesleyan University graduation ceremony and an event by the American Corn Hole Association.

Frank failed to fully launch

Lindell announced plans to launch his own social-media site in March after Twitter banned him and billed the site as a “YouTube-Twitter combination.”

But it was hit by multiple delays, technical problems, and what Lindell claimed was “the biggest attack ever” before Frank ultimately launched as a one-way channel in April.

The site features videos and articles, many written by Lindell himself, that largely focus on voter-fraud conspiracy theories. Some also spread misinformation about the coronavirus, with one article calling vaccines “a deadly depopulation bioweapon.”

Lindell regularly livestreams from the site, hosting other right-wing personalities.

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Mike Lindell told Kimmel he still speaks to Trump once a month – most recently about Trump’s border fears

trump my pillow mike lindell
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell with President Trump at the White House in 2017.

  • MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell told Jimmy Kimmel he speaks to Trump around once a month.
  • Their last conversation was “a couple of weeks ago,” and was about the US border, Lindell said.
  • Lindell, a staunch Trump ally, has parroted Trump’s claims challenging the integrity of the 2020 election.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell speaks to former President Donald Trump about once a month, he told Jimmy Kimmel on Wednesday night.

Lindell said the last time he spoke to Trump was “a couple of weeks ago,” when they discussed the US border.

Lindell, a major GOP donor, was a staunch Trump ally during the former president’s time in the White House, and has repeatedly supported the unsubstantiated claims that the 2020 presidential election was stolen from Trump.

He visited Trump at the White House multiple times, including speaking at a COVID-19 briefing. He also met Trump during Trump’s final week in office, leading to viral photos of him carrying printed notes referencing “martial law.”

Trump has said he may run again for president in 2024.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

“I’ve talked to him once every … maybe month or so, if I’m down there,” Lindell said, without explaining where he meant.

Kimmel then asked Lindell when they last spoke.

“A couple of weeks ago I guess, when he said he was worried about what was going down at the border,” Lindell said. “He said: ‘I’m really worried about what’s going on.'” He did not elaborate on what else specifically they discussed.

Tightening the border between the US and Mexico and clamping down on immigration was a cornerstone of Trump’s 2016 election campaign. During his time in office, he issued anti-immigration executive orders, and tried to build a $15 billion border wall between the two countries, which people are now climbing over with $5 ladders.

Lindell told Kimmel that he first met Trump in August 2016 when he “didn’t know anything about politics.”

“I met this man who had problems, solutions, and he knew what they manifest to,” he said.

Lindell said that after he met Trump he thought “wow, this guy could be the greatest president ever.”

He said that when he returned to Minnesota, he told the press that they had met, which he said led to a huge public backlash. “I was attacked like you’ve never seen,” he said.

Lindell added that he wasn’t in contact with Rudy Giuliani, another close Trump ally, whose apartment was raided by federal investigators just hours before Lindell and Kimmel went live on air. Giuliani, who used to be Trump’s lawyer, has spread similar voter-fraud conspiracy theories to those spread by Lindell.

During Wednesday’s show, Kimmel grilled Lindell on his voter-fraud conspiracy theories, MyPillow’s $1.6 billion lawsuit against voting-technology company Dominion, and his new social-media site, Frank.

Read the original article on Business Insider