Publisher Walter Hussman lobbied UNC against hiring 1619 Project creator Nikole Hannah-Jones at the journalism school named for him: report

Nikole Hannah-Jones
The New York Times magazine journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones speaks at the 137th Commencement of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 16, 2021.

  • Publisher Walter Hussman felt that hiring Hannah-Jones would tie UNC too closely with the 1619 Project.
  • Hussman said Hannah-Jones didn’t recognize the “efforts” of white Americans during the Civil Rights Movement.
  • Hannah-Jones is weighing legal action against the university after a tenure dispute.
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Walter Hussman, the newspaper publisher whose name adorns the University of North Carolina’s journalism school, warned the university against hiring New York Times magazine journalist and 1619 Project creator Nikole Hannah-Jones, according to emails obtained by the digital magazine The Assembly.

Hussman, an alumnus whose $25 million donation to the school in 2019 led to his name being affixed to the institution, felt that Hannah-Jones didn’t give enough credit to white Americans who fought for civil rights and questioned whether her hiring would attract unwanted attention to the journalism school.

The 1619 Project, which was published by The New York Times Magazine in 2019, examines the legacy of slavery and the contributions of Black Americans throughout the nation’s history, drawing the ire of conservatives who have disputed its historical accuracy and are seeking to ban the project from schools across the country.

Hannah-Jones received the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary for the project in 2020.

“I worry about the controversy of tying the UNC journalism school to the 1619 project,” Hussman wrote in a December email to Susan King, the dean of the journalism school. “I find myself more in agreement with Pulitzer prize winning historians like James McPherson and Gordon Wood than I do Nikole Hannah-Jones.”

He added: “These historians appear to me to be pushing to find the true historical facts. Based on her own words, many will conclude she is trying to push an agenda, and they will assume she is manipulating historical facts to support it. If asked about it, I will have to be honest in saying I agree with the historians.”

Read more: What we learned about Joe Biden from riding Amtrak with a Senate colleague who has known the president for five decades

Hussman, the publisher of the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, told The Assembly he wouldn’t discuss in detail his communication about Hannah-Jones as he is a working journalist, but he confirmed the content of the emails.

He has long described an adherence to journalistic “core values” that shape the mission of the publications that he owns. The hallmark values include objectivity, impartiality, integrity, and truth-seeking.

However, additional emails obtained by The Assembly displayed Hussman’s sharp opinions about Hannah-Jones’s work.

In a September email, Hussman rejected part of her opening essay, where she described the fight for civil rights after World War II, writing that Black Americans largely “fought back alone.”

“I think this claim denigrates the courageous efforts of many white Americans to address the sin of slavery and the racial injustices that resulted after the Civil War,” he reportedly wrote in the email.

Hussman then mentioned that Freedom Riders and many white Southern journalists stood alongside Black Americans during the turbulent civil rights battles of the 1960s.

“Long before Nikole Hannah-Jones won her Pulitzer Prize, courageous white southerners risking their lives standing up for the rights of blacks were winning Pulitzer prizes, too,” he wrote, per the emails obtained by The Assembly.

On Sunday, Hannah-Jones tweeted out the article published by The Assembly, calling it “great, if disappointing reporting,” while responding to one of the comments that Hussman reportedly made to UNC.

“Completely irrelevant to my credentials as a journalist, for the record, I’ve long credited Black and white race beat reporters with inspiring my own journalism,” she wrote. “This has been on the bio page of my web site for years.”

In April, Hannah-Jones was offered a position as the Knight Chair in Race and Investigative Journalism at UNC.

However, after Hannah-Jones went through an extensive tenure process with the backing of faculty and the tenure committee, her application hit a roadblock with the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees.

The board of trustees is tasked with reviewing and approving tenure applications, and it declined to move forward with authorizing tenure for Hannah-Jones, who earned a master’s degree in journalism and mass communications from the university, as first reported by NC Policy Watch earlier this month.

On Friday, Hannah-Jones said that she was considering legal action against UNC, expressing that she had “no desire to bring turmoil or a political firestorm to the university” but felt “obligated to fight back against a wave of anti-democratic suppression.”

“As a Black woman who has built a nearly two-decades long career in journalism, I believe Americans who research, study, and publish works that expose uncomfortable truths about the past and present manifestations of racism in our society should be able to follow these pursuits without risk to their civil and constitutional rights,” she said in a statement.

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Fox News contributor praises America for ‘relatively short’ history of slavery

George Murdoch argued on Fox News that American slavery existed for a 'relatively short' amount of time.
George Murdoch argued on Fox News that American slavery existed for a ‘relatively short amount of time.’

  • George “Tyrus” Murdoch downplayed America’s history of slavery while discussing critical race theory.
  • Murdoch argued that America was able to “to get slavery out of the way” in a “relatively short amount of time.”
  • It’s unclear what Murdoch’s argument about the length of slavery in America has to do with anti-racist education.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Fox News personality George Murdoch downplayed America’s history of slavery while arguing during a Fox News appearance on Wednesday that critical race theory shouldn’t be taught in elementary and high schools.

“As far as teaching our multicultural classrooms about race in this country, I think we need to start where we’re at and acknowledge our history. But when you look at slavery in this country opposed to the world, 400 years is still too long, but at the same time other countries dealt with it for thousands of years, where America was able to get it — in a relatively short amount of time in terms of our history — to get slavery out of the way.” ” he said on the daytime news show “America’s Newsroom.”

It took the US almost 100 years after signing the Declaration of Independence — and a civil war — to abolish slavery. Slaves were first brought to Virginia in 1619 and made up a significant portion of the US population for about 250 years.

Critical race theory emerged out of the civil rights movement in the 1960s and 70s and holds that many American laws and systems are structurally racist and that most people of color suffer from racism on a daily basis.

It’s unclear what Murdoch’s argument about the length of slavery in America has to do with the anti-racist theory.

Republicans have aggressively campaigned against the Biden administration efforts to encourage schools to teach students about the history of slavery and its impacts, including systemic racism.

Biden hasn’t proposed any changes to school curricula, but conservative state legislatures across the country have moved to ban critical race theory, which they call a “Marxist doctrine,” from being taught in public schools. They’ve also opposed The New York Times’ Pulitzer Prize-winning 1619 Project being taught to students.

Former President Donald Trump and Republican lawmakers have leaned into the campaign, attempting to fuel anger among the party’s base. Fox has heavily covered the topic, often celebrating the backlash against anti-racist teachings. A Fox spokesperson didn’t immediately provide comment to Insider.

Murdoch, who was formerly a professional wrestler known as “Tyrus,” was accused of sexual harassment in 2019 by his former Fox co-host Britt McHenry. McHenry, then a Fox Nation host, sued Fox News for retaliation after she accused Murdoch of sexual misconduct. After she brought her allegations to Fox executives, Murdoch was promoted to host his own show on the network’s streaming service.

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Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp is urging schools to stop teaching critical race theory, calling it a ‘dangerous ideology’

Brian Kemp
Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp listens to a question during a news conference at the State Capitol on Saturday, April 3, 2021, in Atlanta, about Major League Baseball’s decision to pull the 2021 All-Star Game from Atlanta over the league’s objection to a new Georgia voting law.

  • Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp wants schools to stop teaching critical race theory in classrooms.
  • “This divisive, anti-American agenda has no place in Georgia classrooms,” Kemp said.
  • His remarks are the latest in a push by Republican lawmakers to curtail the teaching of critical race theory.
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Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp on Thursday called for all public schools in the state to stop teaching critical race theory.

In a letter dated May 20, Kemp urged the Georgia State Board of Education “to take immediate steps to ensure that Critical Race Theory and its dangerous ideology do not take root in our state standards or curriculum.”

“This divisive, anti-American agenda has no place in Georgia classrooms,” Kemp tweeted.

He said in his letter that he wants Georgia schools to “focus on our goal of providing the highest quality education to every child in Georgia, without partisan bias or political influence.”

“Education in Georgia should reflect our fundamental values as a state and nation – freedom, equality, and the God-given potential of each individual,” he continued in his letter.

Kemp’s letter marks the latest push by Republican lawmakers to limit the study of critical race theory in the country.

Last month, Sen. Minority Leader Mitch McConnell urged Education Secretary Miguel Cardona to encourage public schools to strip from their curricula projects that he claims promote “revisionism” of US history.

In a letter dated April 29, McConnell and 38 other Senate Republicans specifically referenced the New York Times’ 1619 Project, created to mark the date enslaved Africans were forcibly brought to American soil. The project’s goal to is place “the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of our national narrative.”

McConnell said the 1619 Project and other programs strive to “reorient” US history “away from their intended purposes toward a politicized and divisive agenda.”

“Actual, trained, credentialed historians with diverse political views have debunked the project’s many factual and historical errors, such as the bizarre and inaccurate notion that preserving slavery was a primary driver of the American Revolution,” the letter says.

Some states have begun to implement the project in their curriculum. But the Education Department has not directly told public schools to use or incorporate it. Usually, school curriculum falls at the discretion of state governments rather than any federal agency.

But under President Joe Biden, the Education Department has floated the possibility of offering grants to schools that include the 1619 Project and similar materials in their learning plans.

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1619 Project creator Nikole Hannah-Jones has tenure offer revoked by UNC: report

Nikole Hannah-Jones
The New York Times magazine journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones speaks at the 137th Commencement of Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia, on May 16, 2021.

  • The New York Times journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones had a tenure offer revoked at UNC-Chapel Hill, according to NC Policy Watch.
  • Hannah-Jones was set to teach at the school as a Knight Chair in Race and Investigative Journalism.
  • She is the creator of the 1619 Project, which has drawn a wave of criticism from conservatives.
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According to NC Policy Watch, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill reversed its plans to offer a tenured teaching position to Nikole Hannah-Jones, the New York Times Magazine journalist and creator of the 1619 Project.

Last month, the university offered Hannah-Jones a position as the Knight Chair in Race and Investigative Journalism.

However, after Hannah-Jones went through an extensive tenure process with the backing of faculty and the tenure committee, her application hit a roadblock with the UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees, according to NC Policy Watch.

The board of trustees is tasked with reviewing and approving tenure applications, and it declined to move forward with authorizing tenure for Hannah-Jones, who earned a master’s degree in journalism and mass communications from the university.

Instead, the school has altered its offer from a tenured position to a “fixed-term position,” which would afford her the chance to be considered for tenure after five years.

“It was a work-around,” a UNC-Chapel Hill Board of Trustees member informed NC Policy Watch this week.

After the news broke of the university hiring Hannah-Jones last month, conservative critics, who have slammed the 1619 Project as “propaganda” in its examination of race and racism in the United States, blasted the move.

Susan King, the dean of the University of North Carolina Hussman School of Journalism and Media, told NC Policy Watch of her dismay with the board’s decision.

“It’s disappointing, it’s not what we wanted, and I am afraid it will have a chilling effect,” she said.

She added: “Investigative journalists always are involved in controversies. They dig deep, and they raise questions that demand answers. Part of what they do is raise uncomfortable questions for people, institutions and systems.”

Read more: We joined the White House press corps the day masks came off. Here’s what a ‘hard pass’ and fewer restrictions mean for us – and our reporting.

Following today’s news, over 20 faculty members of the journalism school have signed a public statement asking for the university to reconsider its decision.

“We call on the university’s leadership to reaffirm its commitment to the university, its faculty, and time-honored norms and procedures, and its endorsed values of diversity, equity, and inclusion,” the statement read. “The university must tenure Nikole Hannah-Jones as the Knight Chair in Race and Investigative Journalism.”

Through the Ida B. Wells Society for Investigate Reporting, Hannah-Jones has sought to cultivate and retain reporters and editors of color in the field of investigative reporting, which has long had a dearth of minority journalists in its ranks in major American newsrooms.

She has garnered widespread recognition for the 1619 Project – published by The New York Times Magazine in 2019.

The project examines the legacy of slavery and the contributions of Black Americans throughout the nation’s history. It drew the ire of Republicans who have objected to the project’s historical context and have sought to ban the body of work from being taught in schools. The 1619 Project is also said to have inspired former President Donald Trump’s push for the 1776 commission, which was established to promote “patriotic education.”

In 2017, Hannah-Jones received the highly-coveted MacArthur Fellowship, and in 2020, she won the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary for the 1619 Project, among other awards.

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A Space Force Commander was fired after comments made on conservative podcasts about diversity and Marxism

space force flag
President Donald Trump stands as Chief of Space Operations at US Space Force Gen. John Raymond, second from left, and Chief Master Sgt. Roger Towberman, second from right, hold the United States Space Force flag as it is presented in the Oval Office of the White House, Friday, May 15, 2020, in Washington. Secretary of the Air Force Barbara Barrett stands far left.

  • A commander in the US Space Force was fired for comments made during podcast appearances.
  • Lt. Col. Matthew Lohmeier was promoting his self-published book that claims Marxist ideologies are spreading in the US military.
  • A DOD spokesperson told CNN he was fired “due to loss of trust and confidence in his ability to lead.”
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A commander in the US Space Force was removed from his position following comments he made on podcasts promoting his new book that claims that Marxist ideologies are spreading in the US military.

Lt Col. Matthew Lohmeier was a commander of a unit responsible for detecting ballistic missile launches, according to a report from Military.com.

During a May appearance on the “Information Operation” podcast, Lohmeier claimed leftist ideologies were spreading throughout US society, including in the media, in universities, in the federal government, and in the branches of the US military.

In an appearance on another podcast, the Steve Gruber show, Lohmeier said: “Since taking command as a commander about 10 months ago, I saw what I consider fundamentally incompatible and competing narratives of what America was, is and should be,” according to CNN.

“That wasn’t just prolific in social media, or throughout the country during this past year, but it was spreading throughout the United States military,” he added. “And I had recognized those narratives as being Marxist in nature.”

According to CNN, when asked for an example, Lohmeier mentioned The New York Times’ 1619 project, which critically examines the legacy of slavery in the US. The project has drawn anger from Republicans who have fought to ensure it isn’t taught in schools.

He also said practices like mandatory diversity and inclusion training, which Republicans have also rejected, create divisiveness in the US, according to Military.com.

Lohmeier was promoting his self-published book “Irresistible Revolution: Marxism’s Goal of Conquest & the Unmaking of the American Military.”

The Department of Defense did not immediately return Insider’s request for comment, but an official confirmed to both CNN and Military.com that Lohmeier had been removed from his post.

“Lt. Gen. Stephen Whiting, Space Operations Command commander, relieved Lt. Col. Matthew Lohmeier of command of the 11th Space Warning Squadron, Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado, May 14, due to loss of trust and confidence in his ability to lead,” a Defense Department official told CNN.

“This decision was based on public comments made by Lt. Col. Lohmeier in a recent podcast. Lt. Gen. Whiting has initiated a Command Directed Investigation (CDI) on whether these comments constituted prohibited partisan political activity,” the spokesperson told the outlet.

As Military.com reported, the nature of Lohmeier’s new temporary assignment is not clear.

“I was apprised of the option to have my book reviewed at the Pentagon’s prepublication and security review prior to release, but was also informed that it was not required,” Lohmeier told Military.com.

He said he never intended to “engage in partisan politics”

“I have written a book about a particular political ideology (Marxism) in the hope that our Defense Department might return to being politically non-partisan in the future as it has honorably done throughout history,” he told he outlet.

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1619 Project creator responds to McConnell’s effort to block its teachings in public schools: He’s saying ‘the truth is too difficult’ for America to bear

Nikole Hannah-Jones
The New York Times Magazine journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones.

  • 1619 Project creator Nikole Hannah-Jones rebuts McConnell’s argument that its words are “divisive.”
  • McConnell and 38 Senate Republicans want to bar the project from being taught in public schools.
  • “He’s saying that the truth is too difficult for apparently our nation to bear,” Hannah-Jones said of McConnell.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The 1619 Project creator Nikole Hannah-Jones on Tuesday responded to Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell’s push to remove the project, which was launched on the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first African slaves to what would become the United States, from federal grant programs.

The project, which was published by The New York Times Magazine in 2019, examines the legacy of slavery and the contributions of Black Americans throughout the nation’s history, drawing the ire of conservatives who have sought to ban the body of work from being taught in schools.

In a letter to Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona, the Kentucky Republican and 38 members of his Senate GOP caucus outlined their opposition to the Department of Education developing updated history curricula, alleging that the content is “divisive.”

“This is a time to strengthen the teaching of civics and American history in our schools,” the letter says. “Instead, your Proposed Priorities double down on divisive, radical, and historically-dubious buzzwords and propaganda.”

The letter added: “Americans do not need or want their tax dollars diverted from promoting the principles that unite our nation toward promoting radical ideologies meant to divide us.”

During an appearance on MSNBC’s “The ReidOut” with host Joy Reid, Hannah-Jones rebuts McConnell’s argument that the project perpetuates “a drumbeat of revisionism and negativity,” while also responding to his claim that 1619 was not one of the most important years in US history.

“I don’t know how you teach about 1865 without acknowledging that 1619 was an important year being that 1865 occurs began we began slavery in 1619,” she said, referring to the end of the Civil War in her dialogue. “So when you hear people like him saying that teaching the actual facts of American history are divisive, maybe that’s because we have a divisive history in this country.”

She added: “He’s not arguing that we shouldn’t teach the truth. He’s just saying that the truth is too difficult for apparently our nation to bear and that we’re far too fragile to be able to withstand the scrutiny of the truth.”

Read more: Here’s how Biden is reshaping gender and reproductive rights with policies that are even more progressive than past Democratic presidents

Hannah-Jones said that the legacy of slavery has been an enduring part of the nation’s history, which can’t simply be dismissed.

“The entire argument of the 1619 Project is that slavery pre-dates almost every other American institution,” she said. “That means that it is foundational and embedded in our culture.”

During a CNN appearance earlier this week, Hannah-Jones argued that the national GOP push to ban the 1619 Project in public schools “is fundamentally a free speech issue.”

“It’s not about the facts of history – it’s about trying to prohibit the teaching of ideas they don’t like,” she said.

Former President Donald Trump, who implemented a “1776 Commission” to promote “patriotic education” last year, sought to whip up conservative opposition to the 1619 Project.

Trump’s commission was quickly disbanded by President Joe Biden upon taking office, but not before they released a report saying that the history of slavery in America had been distorted.

Despite the GOP criticism, patriotism is a core theme of the opening 1619 Project essay, written by Hannah-Jones, who received the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary for the project in 2020.

In her essay, “America Wasn’t a Democracy Until Black Americans Made It One,” Hannah-Jones argued that Black Americans have been some of the most valiant fighters for American ideals.

“Despite being violently denied the freedom and justice promised to all, black Americans believed fervently in the American creed,” she wrote. “Through centuries of black resistance and protest, we have helped the country live up to its founding ideals. And not only for ourselves – black rights struggles paved the way for every other rights struggle, including women’s and gay rights, immigrant and disability rights.”

She added: “Without the idealistic, strenuous and patriotic efforts of black Americans, our democracy today would most likely look very different – it might not be a democracy at all.”

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Mitch McConnell’s alma mater rejects his views on the 1619 project and says they are ‘quite troubling’

Mitch McConnell
US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell talks to reporters after the Senate voted to acquit U.S. President Trump of both charges in his Senate impeachment trial in Washington, U.S., February 5, 2020.

  • Sen. Mitch McConnell has rebuked the 1619 project and disagrees with it being taught in schools.
  • McConnell’s alma mater sharply criticized his comments on the 1619 project.
  • The NYT’s 1619 project aims to place “the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of our national narrative.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell’s alma mater, the University of Louisville, sharply criticized comments the senator made at the school this week about the history of slavery in the United States.

During the event on Monday, McConnell was asked about his views on the New York Times’ 1619 project, a long-form magazine piece published in 2019, the 400th anniversary of the beginning of slavery in the United States. The project “aims to reframe the country’s history by placing the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of our national narrative,” according to the Times.

The question came after the Republican leader sent a letter last week to Education Secretary Miguel Cardona, writing that the 1619 project strives to “reorient” US history “away from their intended purposes toward a politicized and divisive agenda” and urging for its removal from school curricula.

McConnell reiterated his stance on Monday, saying: “There are a lot of exotic notions about what are the most important points in American history. I simply disagree with the notion that the New York Times laid out there that the year 1619 was one of those years.”

Senior officials at the university on Thursday rejected McConnell’s statements, according to reporting from WDRB, a Fox-affiliated news station in Louisville.

“As I am sure most of you are aware, the recent statements made by Sen. Mitch McConnell during a press conference in Louisville this week are quite troubling for American descendents of slaves, our allies and those who support us,” V. Faye Jones, the school’s interim senior associate vice president for diversity and equity, wrote in a university-wide email, per WDRB.

“To imply that slavery is not an important part of United States history not only fails to provide a true representation of the facts, but also denies the heritage, culture, resilience and survival of Black people in America,” Jones continued.

Jones added that she, the university’s president, and provost each “reject the idea that the year 1619 is not a critical moment in the history of this country.”

McConnell had listed what he believed to be important dates of American history, including “dates like 1776, the Declaration of Independence, 1787, the Constitution, 1861 to 1865, the Civil War, are sort of the basic tenets of American history,” he said on Monday.

“That issue that we all are concerned about – racial discrimination – it was our original sin. We’ve been working for 200 and some odd years to get past it. We’re still working on it,” McConnell said. “And I just simply don’t think that’s part of the core underpinning of what American civic education ought to be about.”

McConnell’s office did not immediately return Insider’s request for comment.

The author of the 1619 project, Nikole Hannah-Jones, pushed back on McConnell’s comments as well.

“No one can argue that 1619 was not a foundational date in American history,” Hannah-Jones said on MSNBC this week. “He’s just saying the truth is too difficult for, apparently, our nation to bear, and that we’re far too fragile to be able to withstand the scrutiny of the truth.”

The criticism comes as the Biden administration has emphasized tackling racial inequality and discrimination in the country.

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Mitch McConnell and other Senate Republicans demand the Biden administration revoke federal grants from schools that include the 1619 project in their curriculum

Mitch McConnell
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., listens as the Senate Rules Committee holds a hearing on the “For the People Act,” which would expand access to voting and other voting reforms, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 24, 2021.

  • Sen. Mitch McConnell urged the Education Department to avoid support for the 1619 Project.
  • In a letter, he and dozens of other Senate Republicans said the project is a attempt at historical “revisionism.”
  • The project seeks to explain how the experiences of Africans who appeared on US soil in 1619 shaped systemic inequalities still in place today.
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Sen. Minority Leader Mitch McConnell urged Education Secretary Miguel Cardona to encourage public schools to strip from their curricula projects that he claims promotes “revisionism” of US history.

In a letter dated April 29, McConnell and 38 other Senate Republicans specifically referenced the New York Times’ 1619 Project, created to mark the date Africans arrived on American grounds. The project’s goal to is place “the consequences of slavery and the contributions of black Americans at the very center of our national narrative.”

McConnell said the 1619 Project and other programs strive to “reorient” US history “away from their intended purposes toward a politicized and divisive agenda.”

“Actual, trained, credentialed historians with diverse political views have debunked the project’s many factual and historical errors, such as the bizarre and inaccurate notion that preserving slavery was a primary driver of the American Revolution,” the letter says.

Since its 2019 launch, the project has received criticism and pushback, namely from Republican lawmakers and white historians.

Some states have begun to implement the project in their curriculum. But the Education Department has not directly told public schools to use or incorporate it. Usually, school curriculum falls at the discretion of state governments rather than any federal agency.

But under President Joe Biden, the Education Department has floated the possibility of offering grants to schools that include the 1619 Project and similar materials in their learning plans.

“We request that you withdraw these Proposed Priorities and refocus on civic education and American history programs that will empower future generations of citizens to continue making our nation the greatest force for good in human history,” the letter says.

The Education Department did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment. The department is taking comments on the proposed grants until until May 19.

In a statement to the Hill, an Education Department spokesperson characterized the inclusion of materials like the 1619 Project in school curricula as a chance to take seriously the country’s history of systemic inequality and racism.

“The background of the Notice of Proposed Priorities includes examples of how institutions and individuals are finally acknowledging the legacy of systemic inequities in this country and paying attention to it,” the spokesperson said. “The Department welcomes comments on the Proposed Priorities until May 19, 2021.”

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