A 3D-printed concrete tiny home is now on Airbnb – see what it’s like to stay inside the $130 per-night stay

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

  • Take a tour of the Fibonacci House, a 3D-printed concrete tiny home that’s now available on Airbnb.
  • The home was designed, created, and sold by a Dutch company, Twente Additive Manufacturing.
  • The Fibonacci House is Canada’s first 3D-printed home and Airbnb’s first 3D printed concrete tiny home.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
Vacationers have been flocking to Airbnb’s “unique stays,” and searches for these unconventional rentals have jumped 94% in 2021 compared to the same time in 2019, according to Airbnb.

the exterior side view of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

Now, a new one-of-a-kind unique stay is available for summertime vacationers to rent: the Fibonacci House …

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

… Canada’s first 3D-printed home and Airbnb’s first 3D-printed concrete tiny home, according to a press release from Twente Additive Manufacturing (TAM).

a wall of the Fibonacci House under construction
The Fibonacci House.

Twente Additive Manufacturing is a Dutch construction technology group that specializes in, of course, 3D-printed concrete homes.

The Fibonacci House under on-site construction
The Fibonacci House.

Like other 3D-printed concrete homes, the sound and weatherproof Fibonacci House has distinctly curved walls.

the Fibonacci House under construction with only its walls up
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Insider

If the home’s name sounds familiar, that’s because its design and name pay homage to the Fibonacci Sequence – or the golden ratio – hence its curved appearance.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House with a view of its surroundings
The Fibonacci House.

The home was designed to use “the least number of straight lines in the design as possible,” according to the press release.

the Fibonacci House under construction with no roof yet
The Fibonacci House.

The Fibonacci House was printed over 11 days in 20 parts using a 3D concrete printer.

the Fibonacci House being printed
The Fibonacci House.

These components were first printed off-site before being assembled at its current woodsy Canadian location, Lynne Myers reported for Designboom.

the Fibonacci House being printed
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Designboom

The Airbnb now sits in the Kootenay Lake Village at the waterfront Procter Point community.

the Fibonacci House in a wooded area
The Fibonacci House.

Besides 3D printing, the spiral concrete home also capitalizes on another big real estate trend: tiny homes.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

In this case, tiny means 376.7 square feet.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

This space – which follows a curved, spiraling floor plan – fits a living room, kitchen, bathroom, patio, and sleeping loft.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

The bathroom is located in the middle of the curved floor plan, and its shower tops off the center of the spiral.

the Fibonacci House's shower
The Fibonacci House.

The room also has a toilet, sink, and enough storage to accommodate items like towels, according to images on the Airbnb listing.

the Fibonacci House's bathroom
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

Now, moving on to the bedroom. The sleeping loft can be accessed using the ladder, according to the Airbnb listing.

the Fibonacci House's kitchen and ladder
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

If you’ve never slept in a loft before, don’t be too concerned about the height.

the Fibonacci House under construction with no roof yet
The Fibonacci House.

The side of the bed closest to the ledge is guarded by a mesh net.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

In total, this area can sleep two adults and two children.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House with a view of its surroundings
The Fibonacci House.

Moving along, the window-lined kitchen and living room are at the base of the ladder.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

Taking a closer look, the kitchen has amenities like a dual induction cooktop, a coffee maker, and cabinets.

the Fibonacci House's kitchen
The Fibonacci House.

Now, let’s head outside to the last part of this tour, the covered patio.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

Don’t want to cook in the kitchen? You’re in luck. The outdoor space has a barbecue and view of a park and the nearby Kootenay Lake.

the interior of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

Almost all of the home’s elements that aren’t based in concrete are made up of sustainably sourced wood from a nearby community forest.

the bathroom of the Fibonacci House
The Fibonacci House.

The revenue from the Airbnb listing will be donated to World Housing, a home building charity that’s currently looking to construct a community of affordable 3D printed homes for single mothers in Canada.

The exterior of the Fibonacci House with a tree
The Fibonacci House.

The community – currently called “Sakura Place” – will have five three-bedroom homes that will form the appearance of a flower.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

Like other companies that specialize in a 3D printing construction method, World Housing believes 3D concrete printing can address two aspects of the housing crisis: the labor and housing shortage.

a close up of the Fibonacci Houses windows
The Fibonacci House.

Similarly, TAM believes that home construction needs to pivot to decreasing building material use and energy consumption while “rewiring … how people think about the process of designing buildings,” according to the press release.

the Fibonacci House under construction with only its walls up
The Fibonacci House.

“In addition to affordable homes, the market increasingly demands innovative housing concepts,” Yasin Torunoglu, the housing and spatial development alderman at the municipality of Eindhoven, said in a press release regarding another 3D printed concrete home, this time in the Netherlands.

the Fibonacci House under construction with a crane lifting part of the home
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Insider

“With the 3D printed home, we’re now setting the tone for the future: the rapid realization of affordable homes with control over the shape of your own house,” Torunoglu continued.

the Fibonacci House under construction
The Fibonacci House.

A night’s stay at the Fibonacci House ranges from around $127 to $132 per night – not including the cleaning or service fee – depending on the days booked.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

But if you’re currently planning a last-minute trip, don’t go running to the Fibonacci House listing.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

The Fibonacci House is already fully booked for the reminder of July and almost half of August.

the exterior of the Fibonacci House among trees and grass
The Fibonacci House.

Source: Airbnb

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